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Article in todays Herald. Last para is another example of company "speak". This is an enhancement!!



Scottish salmon farm lice cleaning system trialled
2 hrs ago

BY BRIAN DONNELLY
@BrianDonnellyHTBUSINESS CORRESPONDENT
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CleanTreat

CleanTreat

A NEW water purification system to help the treatment of sea lice on farmed salmon is to be tested in Scotland.
The system will be trialled for the first time alongside a medicine used to treat sea lice, in what is claimed could provide a boost for fish health, and clean the water in which they have been treated.
It comes against the backdrop of £40 million a year costs of managing sea lice in Scotland, said to be considered the greatest biological challenge to the aquaculture sector.
The new system, called CleanTreat, is developed by aquaculture biotechnology firm Benchmark, and will be tested at a Mowi fish farm over the next month, in a trial backed by the University of Stirling and the Sustainable Aquaculture Innovation Centre.
[HR][/HR]
HeraldScotland:
[HR][/HR]
The consortium will test the efficacy of CleanTreat in removing Salmosan Vet, a treatment for sea lice, aiming to determine how and in what quantities it can be filtered from treatment water.
It is claimed that introducing CleanTreat could allow fish farmers to respond more quickly to sea lice challenges and improve the process of treating fish for farmers.

Mark Todman, of Benchmark, said: "CleanTreat could enable the use of efficacious and high welfare medicines like Salmosan Vet in the most environmentally responsible manner possible, providing the best outcomes for both farmers and their fish."
Dougie Hunter, of Mowi, said: "We take a number of different approaches to supporting their welfare, including the use of medicines.
"However, we are always conscious of any potential environmental impact and the introduction of CleanTreat could help alleviate some of the current limitations of Salmosan Vet.
"This could be a significant boost to fish health and welfare across our sites."
Heather Jones, SAIC chief executive, said it is "important to note that it is an enhancement of an already closely controlled and tightly regulated process".

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What is It,?
A few more lines from the web....
Mike
Traditionally, salmon have been treated with Salmosan Vet within a closed tarpaulin placed inside a net pen. It is intended that salmon will instead be guided into a bespoke vessel for treatment, with the fish returned to the net pen and the water transferred to the CleanTreat system. The medicine is then removed, along with any organic matter caught in the filtration process, and the purified water is released into the sea.
 

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A few more lines from the web....
Mike
Traditionally, salmon have been treated with Salmosan Vet within a closed tarpaulin placed inside a net pen. It is intended that salmon will instead be guided into a bespoke vessel for treatment, with the fish returned to the net pen and the water transferred to the CleanTreat system. The medicine is then removed, along with any organic matter caught in the filtration process, and the purified water is released into the sea.
"Guided in to a bespoke vessel for treatment"..........sucked up and into a well boat to be washed in some horrendous(dubiously legal) broth then sucked back into their pens. Then, they will have you believe that, the water the fish were treated in is sent through a filter to take out all(some) of the nasties. It's nonsense, just another tactic to keep this sinister industry going as long as it can.I'd love to see a peer revue of this.
 

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"Guided in to a bespoke vessel for treatment"..........sucked up and into a well boat to be washed in some horrendous(dubiously legal) broth then sucked back into their pens. Then, they will have you believe that, the water the fish were treated in is sent through a filter to take out all(some) of the nasties. It's nonsense, just another tactic to keep this sinister industry going as long as it can.I'd love to see a peer revue of this.
 

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What is It,?
Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid. A Monsanto/Bayer insecticide. It and it's close versions were banned in the EU by 2018 as a persistent risk to bees.
It breaks down in sunlit water but persists in deeper darker water and in some aquifers.
.
Highly ( acutely) toxic to terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates and birds but to a much lesser degree in fish and mammals. However in farmed rainbow trout there was found to be ' bioaccumulation '.

MOWI and its peers are desperate to diminish the effects of lice both upon their product and the treatments for lice infestations upon the product's image.

Imidacloprid in its boat-borne bath is a more effective , directed iteration of previous open water chemical dosage. It is still ingested by the salmon and ultimately it is either dried and burnt or more probably it will be discarded in at sea.

It is a further chemical burden to the food chain and deleterious to the environment.

Scottish seawater farms have to appear to be winning a war with lice and poor fish husbandry to stave off the coming threat from efficient, flexible, chemical-lite RAS units which can be sited anywhere on dry land.

For the current Scottish Government it is crucial to resist a threat to it's claim to provide rural employment through distant Scottish salmon units in the Highlands and Islands . A much more grown-up approach might be to encourage the RAS alternative and seize the high ground...it would be brave and perhaps costly for the SNP's coffers.

Eventually the sea farms will come to be surpassed by RAS products because their loch sites are remote ( distant for transport ) and remain a threat to the environment and people's health.
 

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Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid. A Monsanto/Bayer insecticide. It and it's close versions were banned in the EU by 2018 as a persistent risk to bees.
That's the stuff, brutal for bees. From memory, just need a pin head amount practically to kill a whole hive... Some of my older colleagues, I believe, ran parts of the bioaccumulation etc studies for it back in the day (and a few other neonicotinoids).
 

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Two mega drug companies try to ply there wares, not good.
I did hear of a company that was developing a under water laser to zap the little blighters, it required 4 per pen, think the costs were to high. It’s easier just to toss some toxic chemicals in the water and hope nobody notices The side effects.
 

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Lasers? Set to stun Spock!
I do enjoy how science has happily adopted the works of Thunderbirds, Star Trek and others from 50 yrs since....
Sadly I suspect you are right; more liquid poison required. Lasers are less useful than wrasse and so a useless cost.
If Cermac and Mowi could have done this open sea farming without antibiotics & chemicals they would be happier than we. They continue only because money always comes before the environment and central governments care little about water quality and desertification of lochs if they can point to jobs created. No matter that they are relatively few, mostly menial and not especially well paid.
 
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