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When will the first Pink Salmon of 2023 be reported in a UK river?

  • 3rd week in July

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  • 4th week in July

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  • Anytime in August

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Sorry to derail slightly but does this species compete with the native salmon?
If you listen to the simpletons (such as those who have caught a few in Russia) then no. According to them they only go half a mile upstream, the juveniles leave freshwater the day they hatch and they grow to an adult size by feeding on fresh air and sea water and compete with nothing...

The truth of course is that we don't know how they will affect Atlantic salmon (and sea trout and all manner of other native species) in the UK. Thousands of fish will be eating something around the coast (smolts?) and not all the juveniles will leave the rivers that quickly or be spawned in the lower reaches. The pinks will of course also provide a food source for native species (including birds and seals).

One reason they might be doing better than Atlantic salmon is that they don't spend very long in freshwater (a few months is about the longest) so are less affected by freshwater pressures such as predation, pollution and droughts. This kind of feeds into the idea that the problems aren't all at sea, who would have thought?


Andy
 

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If you listen to the simpletons (such as those who have caught a few in Russia) then no. According to them they only go half a mile upstream, the juveniles leave freshwater the day they hatch and they grow to an adult size by feeding on fresh air and sea water and compete with nothing...

The truth of course is that we don't know how they will affect Atlantic salmon (and sea trout and all manner of other native species) in the UK. Thousands of fish will be eating something around the coast (smolts?) and not all the juveniles will leave the rivers that quickly or be spawned in the lower reaches. The pinks will of course also provide a food source for native species (including birds and seals).

One reason they might be doing better than Atlantic salmon is that they don't spend very long in freshwater (a few months is about the longest) so are less affected by freshwater pressures such as predation, pollution and droughts. This kind of feeds into the idea that the problems aren't all at sea, who would have thought?


Andy
Not many on the west coast.
You sure a lot of issues arent at sea.
 
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