Salmon Fishing Forum banner
21 - 34 of 34 Posts

Registered
Joined
5,051 Posts
River forth used to be thick with them , they hit the decline around 20 years ago along with the pike and perch , then the salmon followed suit , one thing's for sure there's no sign of recovery on the horizon
 

Registered
Joined
1,559 Posts
I was lucky enough to catch an elver at the junction between Teith and Kelty Burn about 2020. Quite a tiny wee thing amidst the gravel, there. We used to get brook lampreys and stone loaches by the dozen in Alva Burn biitd ca 73.
 

Registered
Joined
1,241 Posts
Its a bit different there. Lough Neagh is a managed eel fishery. Im pretty sure they stock glass eel to the lough in the millions then harvest them when grown
The reason the loch still has eels is due to it being controlled with a stocking policy, if the same principles were applied to salmon they would not be on the red list. As with the Delphi, Carron and Wick the salmon would have disappeared had it not been due to the restocking.
 

Registered
Joined
3,686 Posts
As CharlieH mentioned above the elver was once a big feature in parts of Gloucestershire and the image shown was a common sight on both the Wye and Severn. As the price of elvers sky rocketed, fights broke out on the river banks to gain prime positions.
Another interesting link:

Sky Cloud Tree Plant Grassland
 

Registered
Joined
12,443 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The reason the loch still has eels is due to it being controlled with a stocking policy, if the same principles were applied to salmon they would not be on the red list. As with the Delphi, Carron and Wick the salmon would have disappeared had it not been due to the restocking.
Polar opposite life cycles surely?

Eels grow and mature in freshwater then migrate to sea to spawn. Salmon grow and mature at sea and return to freshwater to spawn.

Once either of the species make it to the high seas, it really is nothing short of dumb luck if they survive or not.

The one thing that both species appear to have in common is that a hell of a lot fewer of them are returning from the high seas, despite migrating to very different areas of the ocean.
 

Registered
Joined
4,964 Posts
Polar opposite life cycles surely?

Eels grow and mature in freshwater then migrate to sea to spawn. Salmon grow and mature at sea and return to freshwater to spawn.

Once either of the species make it to the high seas, it really is nothing short of dumb luck if they survive or not.

The one thing that both species appear to have in common is that a hell of a lot fewer of them are returning from the high seas, despite migrating to very different areas of the ocean.
With massive death ships like the Margiris hoovering and processing 250 tonnes of fish every day it鈥檚 amazing there鈥檚 anything left in the sea at all.
 

Registered
Joined
12,443 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
With massive death ships like the Margiris hoovering and processing 250 tonnes of fish every day it鈥檚 amazing there鈥檚 anything left in the sea at all.
Just as you mention Margaris again, I checked one day last week and both it and the Annelies Illena, the two largest factory ships in the world, were both actively fishing off the coast of Donegal.

I just checked there now before replying and the Margaris hasn't given an updated location for over 5 days. The Illena seems to be making it's way to a port but is currently off the west coast of the Hebridies.

There are certainly less fish in the sea as a result. 馃檨
 

Registered
Joined
1,241 Posts
Polar opposite life cycles surely?

Eels grow and mature in freshwater then migrate to sea to spawn. Salmon grow and mature at sea and return to freshwater to spawn.

Once either of the species make it to the high seas, it really is nothing short of dumb luck if they survive or not.

The one thing that both species appear to have in common is that a hell of a lot fewer of them are returning from the high seas, despite migrating to very different areas of the ocean.
I was referring to the eel fishery where they are caught as the enter the river and assisted upstream to the loch via vehicle to avoid all the mortality that entails, the fishery controls the numbers caught to provide a viable succession for the future. I believe the only eel fishery in Irish uk waters. Similar that being carried out on the Lochy, which I wish them luck with. The same is being done on the Shin due to the high mortality (almost 100 %) by catching the smolts and transferring them below the Lochs and dams. If nothing is done the salmon will be lost. I鈥檓 not suggesting for one moment the very high mortality caused at sea could be controlled, but it will take a monument shift in human and political policy to have any affect.
 

Registered
Joined
12,443 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I was referring to the eel fishery where they are caught as the enter the river and assisted upstream to the loch via vehicle to avoid all the mortality that entails, the fishery controls the numbers caught to provide a viable succession for the future. I believe the only eel fishery in Irish uk waters. Similar that being carried out on the Lochy, which I wish them luck with. The same is being done on the Shin due to the high mortality (almost 100 %) by catching the smolts and transferring them below the Lochs and dams. If nothing is done the salmon will be lost. I鈥檓 not suggesting for one moment the very high mortality caused at sea could be controlled, but it will take a monument shift in human and political policy to have any affect.
As I said earlier in the thread, the lough neagh eel Fishery is something I know very little about.

Knowing the tidal area of the River Bann, the outflow of lough neagh, relatively well, I'm not really sure where it would be possible to fish for the elvers in the numbers required to sustain the lough neagh Fishery.

From the Barmouth in Castlerock to 'The Cutts' above Coleraine, (the first major barrier to migration) the river is extremely deep and wide. I'm not sure where they would be intercepted for transport.

I'm in no way saying that it doesn't happen, I simply do not know that it does.

I just assumed that they bought in the elvers and released them in the lough.
 

Registered
Joined
1,241 Posts
As I said earlier in the thread, the lough neagh eel Fishery is something I know very little about.

Knowing the tidal area of the River Bann, the outflow of lough neagh, relatively well, I'm not really sure where it would be possible to fish for the elvers in the numbers required to sustain the lough neagh Fishery.

From the Barmouth in Castlerock to 'The Cutts' above Coleraine, (the first major barrier to migration) the river is extremely deep and wide. I'm not sure where they would be intercepted for transport.

I'm in no way saying that it doesn't happen, I simply do not know that it does.

I just assumed that they bought in the elvers and released them in the lough.
Have a look at this,
.
 

Registered
Joined
12,443 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
So it is wild fish they're working with and not artificially reared ones? A very different model to a hatchery?

They must trap them at the Cutts. You couldn't even guess at the tonnage of Salmon removed from the Bann system at those traps alone over the years.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top