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Thread: Tuna

  1. #21

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    I think the chance of a big tuna would be enough to tempt me onto a small boat, as usualy unless its requires a tug boat and has a restaurant/bar im not intrested.
    Awesome creatures.

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  2. #22

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    Dead one photographed by a work mate on Garry Beach , Tolsta , Lewis earlier this year.

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    Remember Thomas Muir of Huntershill

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Aberdeenshire
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    Any known reasons for it dying. Caught and released perhaps?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
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    1,646

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    Quote Originally Posted by tony considine View Post
    Any known reasons for it dying. Caught and released perhaps?
    We think it was chasing bait fish and took a wrong turn.
    At this time of year, all sorts of fish was onto the shore. A guy that took a chunk of tuna last year had a live haddy of about 2lbs wash it at his feet as he fished for flatfish. Two years ago at this time of year a good sized Rays Bream washed ashore in the same place.

  5. #25
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    Feb 2016
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    Aberdeenshire
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    312

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    A lot of tuna are being seen and quite a few caught, from fairly close in off Cornwall, mid channel between West Wales and Ireland, round Donegal and N.W. Scotland.
    The ones caught legally, 'experimentally' ,will be tagged. The ones caught accidentally not.
    The accidental captures are exactly that, as far as I know. Any bait set for sharks,especially a livebait, will be perfect for tuna if there are any in the area.
    The 'problem', if it is one, is blue shark tackle is at the most 50lb, and porbeagle tackle 80lb. Neither are adequate for catching tuna. Some will be landed, but the fight will be in excess of two hours. This is a long time for such a hard fighting pelagic fish and it would expend a great deal of energy. You wonder about the survival rate of released fish.
    t.c.

  6. #26

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    It is debatable whether a lot of this Tuna fishing is really "fishing" as we know it, especially the playing part. Most is done with the rod in a holder in the boat, so realistically you are just winding, no supporting the rod using your own strength, the boat is used to follow/ run down the fish, mainly on 120lb class gear. That gear is not user friendly without a chair, 80lb class is too much for 99% of mere mortals for anything but shortish scraps using a harness (stand up style) for shark, smaller marlin type species etc. Tuna possess incredible stamina, far more than most of us can possibly match, a 120lb outfit, might reasonably apply 40/50lb drag pressure on a fish, that is a lot, sustained for long periods, if you think you could do that, for most I would say ,dream on, don,t forget the pitching boat, unsteady footing, plus the real chance with the slightest lack of attention, a tip wrap, and your over the side!
    scary stuff, but very exciting.
    peter

  7. #27

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    Peter, you are spot on.

    I researched having a go for these fish in the SW. I spoke to a mate who has landed quite a few (legally) in Ireland. The right gear alone was going to cost me upwards of a grand.

    Then I mentioned the (small) boat I was going to fish from and he told me that when I hooked one it would probably pull me in and that I was insane !

    Im an experienced saltwater fly angler who has landed plenty of big tarpon and GTs but these tuna are another league.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK
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    219

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    Tunny on the fly

    Mitchell-Henry, Col. Peel and Mrs Sparrow took fish of 469-735lbs on the very sturdiest hickory & bamboo 6' rods and perhaps large Coxe reels as approved of by Zane Grey.

    Brutal stuff, exhausting.

    I will get really excited when we have dog tooth, skipjack , false albacore , and Spanish mackerel. All very suitable to a fly rod . All small enough (usually) to be brought to hand in a timely manner for safe release...unless the BBQ is ready!!

    In the meantime scomber scombrus on a 4 wt is quite thrilling enough.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by meyre View Post
    Tunny on the fly

    Mitchell-Henry, Col. Peel and Mrs Sparrow took fish of 469-735lbs on the very sturdiest hickory & bamboo 6' rods and perhaps large Coxe reels as approved of by Zane Grey.

    Brutal stuff, exhausting.

    I will get really excited when we have dog tooth, skipjack , false albacore , and Spanish mackerel. All very suitable to a fly rod . All small enough (usually) to be brought to hand in a timely manner for safe release...unless the BBQ is ready!!

    In the meantime scomber scombrus on a 4 wt is quite thrilling enough.
    Do these other and more angler friendly fish turn up in similar areas as the tuna or would we not get them this far north due to the sea temps ? The albacor etc look great fun on the flee.

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  10. #30

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    Albacore have been caught on long range recce trips off Cornwall, the smaller tuna species are a possibility, late summer/early autumn, when the sea temperature is at its peak, a longshot for sure, and finding a suitable boat to get way out for a long exploratory trip might be tricky, also very expensive. Most of the other interesting species more suitable for a fly approach are unfortunately tropical/equatorial orientated, probably the nearest your going to find some would be off Madera or maybe the Mediterranean, where barracuda and amberjack lurk!
    peter

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