Will I learn water craft quicker with lure or fly?

Riverrat

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New to forum, new to Edinburgh and very much looking forward to getting stuck in after lock down. I've got pretty wide lure experience, including a variety of river species (bows, browns, smallmouth bass, yellowfish, a few steelhead, whitefish etc) also fly fished quite extensively but using SH rods only. I'm inclined to start with lure gear and try to improve my river craft first and then start to learn the appropriate DH techniques after a season or two. Any thoughts on this would be welcome. Also wondering (for Forth area rivers, Almond is closest) what sort of gear would be a sensible compromise? I've tended to use Japanese rods for most of of lure fishing. They do a lot of cherry salmon spinning in very fast water with gear that might be about right for grilse, reasonable sea trout and the odd bigger fish. 7'7"-8'6" foot-ish, 10-12lb leaders, 14-18lb braid. Obviously this is not suitable for big rivers and early season, I have heavier gear for that. I don't want to be under-gunned but also want to enjoy any brownies or sea trout that come along. I'll be using single hooks as per the rules. Thanks!
 

chriswjx

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Welcome to Edinburgh mate, I can safely say you don't need a big rod for the Almond. You could probably cast bank to bank with a 6ft rod if you had to even at its widest :ROFLMAO: Word of caution on the Almond, its singles or doubles only which is why I just went straight to the fly when I started fly fishing last year. Shame I didn't get out as much, as I wasn't too confident with my SH casting at that point... Spent much more time on fisheries just trying to nail getting a line out...

From the stretches I saw last year though, you could probably get away with SH spey casting on most stretches of the Almond or a 11ft ish switch (for the larger stretches down Beat 1 of Cramond's). I'm not sure about catch returns for the Cramond stretch, but I know there was 1 salmon caught at Almondell park last year which was around 10lb? So you don't really need anything too heavy.

I'm hoping to get out a bit more this year now that I can cast a reasonable line for dries (and try a bit of euro nymphing). Also, there's a section just upstream from School Brae (halfway down Beat 1 of Cramond) that I've been using to practice 2h casting on a switch rod.
 

chriswjx

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Just realised I at no point attempted to answer your title question 😂 I would go with fly, spinning I always felt like I just chuck it out, reel it back in... With the fly I was trying to look for ripples etc to make more efficient use of every cast.
 

nickolas

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I have fished with single hand rods for salmon for 15 years, also tarpon marlin and GT’s ,a single hand rod in the right hands is just as capable. As to craft if you have caught wild trout like the one in your photo you will know quite a lot of river craft, just put the hours in and you will be rewarded.
 

kimbo

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I have used both methods, I prefer to fly fish.
That said with spinning you can search every inch of the river and any depth with the one lure, on my local river I found many salmon lies with the lure which you could not fish a fly.
However there is an art to spinning just as there is an art to fly fishing, prawning or worming. In the right hands any method can be very rewarding.
 

MCXFisher

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Welcome to the Forum and to the UK. If you wish to find some basic tips on fishing for salmon with the fly, including plenty on watercraft, have a look at Just One Week.
 

Rrrr

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A day with the spinning rod and a mepp in low water with a good set of polarised glasses will tell you quite abit. You can watch the lure coming back and will see fish turn or move.

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

Riverrat

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I have used both methods, I prefer to fly fish.
That said with spinning you can search every inch of the river and any depth with the one lure, on my local river I found many salmon lies with the lure which you could not fish a fly.
However there is an art to spinning just as there is an art to fly fishing, prawning or worming. In the right hands any method can be very rewarding.
Thanks for that, my thinking is exactly as you describe, I believe I'll learn about a stretch more quickly with spinning gear than fly. That said, I'd rather catch fish on the fly if conditions are at all suitable.
 

Riverrat

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I have fished with single hand rods for salmon for 15 years, also tarpon marlin and GT’s ,a single hand rod in the right hands is just as capable. As to craft if you have caught wild trout like the one in your photo you will know quite a lot of river craft, just put the hours in and you will be rewarded.
Thanks Nickolas, I was thinking about going with something like a 10' for 7 or 8 when the time comes and perhaps a DH later as I'll be spending more time on the smaller rivers initially. I've got a 9' 6wt which should be ok for ST and a bit of streamer fishing for the browns.
 

Riverrat

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I think you learn more when fly fishing. However, whatever method you use it is always a good idea to try to think what your fly/lure is doing all the time you fish it.
Thanks, brilliant advice, I find this easier with lure than fly TBH, unless using a dry or nymph / indicator.
 

nickolas

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Thanks Nickolas, I was thinking about going with something like a 10' for 7 or 8 when the time comes and perhaps a DH later as I'll be spending more time on the smaller rivers initially. I've got a 9' 6wt which should be ok for ST and a bit of streamer fishing for the browns.
9ft for a 6wt love to fish delicate with this set up, then maybe the 8wt when the wind gets up.
 

neilt

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Enjoy the Almond, get up the water of leith - Colinton to Currie for wee stream trout too.
If you really get going with the salmon look at joining a Perth club - PDAA or Stormont. The Tay’s a big river and fantastic to fish. A lot of Edinburgh guys are in both clubs and travel up - 45mins - to fish the Tay.
 
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