Why Do You Salmon Fish?

Tangled

Well-known member
Messages
858
Reaction score
666
God knows.

We can give alibis and rationalisations, we can bang on about scenery and wildlife, but reasons for standing in a river trying to catch a fish that almost certainly isn't there then putting it back if we accidentally catch it? No.

It's inexplicable.
 

Rrrr

Well-known member
Messages
7,475
Reaction score
2,044
Right i go to fish for salmon, i don't go salmon fishing because i cant catch any.....sea trout on the other hand.....
Im the opposite, i do ok with salmon but struggle with the seatrout. Had one all season at 6 1/2 lb and thats all. I loose almost all that i hook

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

Troosers Too

Member
Messages
75
Reaction score
76
Location
Worcestershire
Standing thigh deep in the Ness in early April, I've certainly asked my self why I do it.

Solitude, natue and scenery are big parts. The level of concentration required is enough to take me away from real life's worries but not so much that it gets me frazzled - after all a day's shooting in which you miss everything would be a humiliating disaster but a blank day on the river can still be a good day.

But the main reason is so that I can go on an internet fishing forum and learn about stuff I actually know really little about - Brexit, Covid, vaccinations, etc. from people who know just as much as me.
 

Meldon9

Active member
Messages
212
Reaction score
82
No difference to my reasons for trout fishing, stalking and fowling - peace and quiet in grand surroundings.

Salmon fishing is becoming less attractive with the rise of the fly only, C&R zealots.
 

uplands50

Active member
Messages
573
Reaction score
65
Location
Castell Nedd
Because I can, it’s difficult, the thrill of the tug, the solitude, fishing in some fantastic scenery, the privilege of seeking such a wonderful quarry.
 

rytenuff

Active member
Messages
263
Reaction score
105
Location
Inversneckonia
When I was much younger I used to watch the "old men" Spey casting long lines on the wide Ness. It looked so elegant, graceful and effortless.
I fish for salmon with salmon gear but my enjoyment comes mainly from trying to emulate these old men with my casts.
However, no matter how well the (very) occasional line goes out and turns over to land gently on the water, in my mind, it is and probably never will be as perfect as the memory of these casts by the men of old.
 

westie4566

Well-known member
Messages
9,279
Reaction score
3,702
Location
Aberdeen
It runs through my very veins. Ever since my first salmon closer to 50 years ago than 40.

Even before that fishing off the point of the local harbour and rocks, in crystal clear summer waters, fish and how to get them to take my bait fascinated me. It was always the bigger one's I wanted to catch. :)

For me, salmon were always the prize above all. Couldn't wait to join the 'older guys' that I watched fishing the Deveron. Even at a very young age I would watch them for hours on end.

All these decades later, the fascination hasn't dimmed one bit fishing for these enigmatic creatures. We know so much about them yet still so little and long may that last.

Over the decades obviously things have changed and I've had to alter my expectations on the catches front. However that has been tempered by the lifelong friendships made. A handful of folk who I fish with year in year out, through good times and bad. Even when the fishing is grim a day on a river with them is always a thing of joy. Also the new friendships made with 'brothers of the angle' each of whom add something to my experience and, I hope, me to theirs.

Good company and good craic by the side of a salmon stream is a hard thing to beat and sometimes the stars align and those silver leapers decide to play ball.
 

Mickfish

Well-known member
Messages
710
Reaction score
270
Location
Warrington
It runs through my very veins. Ever since my first salmon closer to 50 years ago than 40.

Even before that fishing off the point of the local harbour and rocks, in crystal clear summer waters, fish and how to get them to take my bait fascinated me. It was always the bigger one's I wanted to catch. :)

For me, salmon were always the prize above all. Couldn't wait to join the 'older guys' that I watched fishing the Deveron. Even at a very young age I would watch them for hours on end.

All these decades later, the fascination hasn't dimmed one bit fishing for these enigmatic creatures. We know so much about them yet still so little and long may that last.

Over the decades obviously things have changed and I've had to alter my expectations on the catches front. However that has been tempered by the lifelong friendships made. A handful of folk who I fish with year in year out, through good times and bad. Even when the fishing is grim a day on a river with them is always a thing of joy. Also the new friendships made with 'brothers of the angle' each of whom add something to my experience and, I hope, me to theirs.

Good company and good craic by the side of a salmon stream is a hard thing to beat and sometimes the stars align and those silver leapers decide to play ball.
Great post and I can fully identify with your initial exploration of catching sea fish off the rocks and piers which led to your absorption with this sport.

Mick
 

firefly

Well-known member
Messages
1,041
Reaction score
393
Location
Belgium
For me it was the cherry on the cake, the completion of a lifetime of fishing. The sensation of being rewarded at the end by such a majestic creature and the feeling of gratitude to the donor remains inexplicable.
 

ibm59

Well-known member
Messages
13,262
Reaction score
1,664
I don’t really know.
‘They started off as a slightly irritating by product of worming the local streams for trout , and developed from there.
‘Irritating ? A hooked salmon could spook a whole stretch of productive trout water , especially at low levels.
And there were far more around back in those days. 😉
 

glenelg100

Well-known member
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
128
Location
Glasgow
It’s the unknown, you just don’t know what size of fish you are going to catch if anything at all. When not catching I do enjoy trying to improve my casting. Some of the scenery is fantastic and very peaceful, going for the bows I enjoy but it doesn’t come close
 

sneakypeter

Well-known member
Messages
1,847
Reaction score
491
Apart from all of the above stated reasons, I love the potential sheer diversity offered, the waters I like ,all allow, fly, spinning and bait fishing in season, salmon get caught on a vast array of stuff, by accident each year, why not try the unusual, I have had some real interest on a variety of alternatives, from Redgills, squid, sandeels, rubber shads, sprats, off the wall different flies etc. salmon do not read, or write the books, dare to be different!!!!
 

keirstream

Well-known member
Messages
8,028
Reaction score
3,563
Location
Stirling
Here's the beginning of the essence of why I salmon fish.
The long wait over the close season.
Picking up bits and pieces, gathering new flies and sorting them out ready for the clock ticking down to March and the 1st serious chance of casting one of them to a springer that you just know is in his favourite lie, in that glassy water, over there, just off the seam.(y)
Already I'm contemplating the choice of rod, head and tip density required to hold that fly in his zone just long enough to make him interested.
Next cast a wee bit faster.
Next cast, that's the one, wee short 6 inch strips, you just know------- and there he is. Perfect.:D
It's all about the anticipation prior to every trip, the intel that fish are in the river, the forecast looking bob on.
Here are the 1st of my winter organisational arrangements being put in place as the anticipation of a new season mounts.:)
Firstly, my new wallet from Art Merk.
Followed by the inside of the wallet filled with bananas, monkeys , posh toshes and black and yellows.
Along with, of course, the anticipation of sipping a fine Glengoyne to calm me down(y)(y)
ArtMerkWallet.jpg
ArtMerkWallet1.jpg
 

salarchaser

Well-known member
Messages
3,150
Reaction score
1,893
Location
Cheshire
Growing up in the Rhondda and learning to fish for trout in the lakes that dotted the Brecon Beacons and beyond I often read about the salmon and seatrout around Britain. Never really thought about salmon due to affordability and travel. College got in the way and then I moved to Bristol for my first job where playing rugby and starting a family limited trout fishing, let alone anything else.
Eventually I moved to Cheshire for a new job and hung up my rugby boots so fishing again came to the fore.
My new home was within 40 mins of the Welsh Dee where I joined a club. Mainly focussed on trout and graying, though the opportunity was there for salmon.
I knew I could catch trout, indeed I go out after trout and grayling expecting to catch.
Salmon gave me a new challenge and I fish for salmon more in hope than expectation.
I now spend 30 to 50% of my fishing days after salmon and have expanded my range.
Salmon was originally seen as a new challenge but has now become a firm part of my season.
 

Jimmcl

Well-known member
Messages
170
Reaction score
443
Location
Somerset
Here's the beginning of the essence of why I salmon fish.
The long wait over the close season.
Picking up bits and pieces, gathering new flies and sorting them out ready for the clock ticking down to March and the 1st serious chance of casting one of them to a springer that you just know is in his favourite lie, in that glassy water, over there, just off the seam.(y)
Already I'm contemplating the choice of rod, head and tip density required to hold that fly in his zone just long enough to make him interested.
Next cast a wee bit faster.
Next cast, that's the one, wee short 6 inch strips, you just know------- and there he is. Perfect.:D
It's all about the anticipation prior to every trip, the intel that fish are in the river, the forecast looking bob on.
Here are the 1st of my winter organisational arrangements being put in place as the anticipation of a new season mounts.:)
Firstly, my new wallet from Art Merk.
Followed by the inside of the wallet filled with bananas, monkeys , posh toshes and black and yellows.
Along with, of course, the anticipation of sipping a fine Glengoyne to calm me down(y)(y)
View attachment 53959View attachment 53960
I bought the exact same wallet from him, and am just in the process of filling it. Lovely piece of kit!
 

iainmortimer

Well-known member
Messages
1,279
Reaction score
1,692
Fishing in general?
Escapism. Shut out the hustle and bustle and stress of 'normal' life in the rat race which is replaced by the basic instinct of the hunter at one with nature. I like standing in and generally being by running water. The ever changing swirls and flows, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day, season by season as the river washes away the strains of everyday life. I love the wild life, the sound of the wind in the trees the changing colours and smells depending on weather and season.

Fly fishing
The art of it. I like that I am catching on a 'bait' that I have created using a graceful fly cast. and that I have managed to fool a fish into believing my small bunch of fur and feather was something to eat. I like travelling light and being mobile - constantly active. I like the challenge of getting my fly into just the right spot. I like the landscape and scenery around a rocky river, graceful chalk stream or bubbling burn.

Salmon fishing specifically?
Challenge. I like the colourful flies but mostly I like the fact that I am fishing for a wild fish, a fish that is a tourist and so may not even be there unlike the resident wild trout. I like the fact that when I get lucky there is even then no guarantee that I win as the power and the guile of the fish has to be matched by my own skill and experience. That means there is an ever present hope rather than just an expectation for put me on a trout river and I expect to catch being surprised if I don't. Put me on a Salmon river and I hope that I may get lucky which means every pluck and pull is somehow more intense, and every fish is appreciated so much more for the challenge that it has brought and because for once I have won out against the odds.
 
Top