Why do most people on this board think fishing is dying ,and we need an influx of youngsters?

Mattytree

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I think fishing in general does, average age on the river bank does not look young to me.
im probably the youngest in the last two clubs I’ve been in, I’m 42... tell a lie there is one junior in my current club that I’ve seen fishing and I think this year he won’t be.
 

lefthandup

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I think fishing in general does, average age on the river bank does not look young to me.
im probably the youngest in the last two clubs I’ve been in, I’m 42... tell a lie there is one junior in my current club that I’ve seen fishing and I think this year he won’t be.
It was never a young man's sport even when I was young..(in my area)..most of the guys I'd meet were older apart from me and a few mates.

Even the older guys were few and far between.
 

rotenone

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generally an opinion of some the anglers who have fished through the golden times and big runs we used to have, when you have fished inexpensive rivers in Ireland and had truly exceptional fishing in years gone by, it can be a bit hard to be told it's a case of big money in Russia to replicate that.

For example if I told you I had caught double figures of salmon in a day on free rivers in the west of Ireland back in my youth it might be hard for newcomers to believe.

I think the sport has become very commercial and generally overpriced so this compounds peoples disappointment and negative out look, even in my short life time (40 years) I've seen cycles in salmon fishing but there is no doubt apart from a few special rivers its becoming increasingly difficult to find quality fishing that just not attractive to youngsters as they want to catch plenty of fish

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Hardyreels

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I gave up trying to save anything except myself and my own mind long ago. I'm old enough now to have witnessed many changes in a wide array of fisheries spread across the North American continent some of them positive and some not so good. Where I currently live and fish we need fewer not more people trying to wring the last bit of life from these rivers. I'm happy alone.

As for the concept that swelling the numbers of fishers providing some mysterious political clout to the sport I think that's a nice idea but doubt the effectiveness. To the point, I don't see where an additional 100 people fishing my favorite beat would affect decisions being made by the legislators or Governor, that would be 100 constituents which is not what I consider a force to be reckoned with.
 

sneakypeter

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Its certainly not dying in the south, despite some poor seasons of late, most syndicates are full, with waiting lists, that's both salmon and coarse fishing. It is probably true that most members are not youngsters , mainly 30+ with a large percentage 50+ and retired people. The youngsters seem to find the carp puddles more to their liking, more action, sociable and cheaper, not proper fishing, but a start, some will be adventurous and move to rivers/game fishing, but very few.
peter
 

Jockiescott

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It is true that I don't see too many kids along the river but every year there a new faces in around the late 20s/early 30s.

Kids seem to enjoy the stockie ponds and salmon fishing just doesn't have the instant rewards that stockie bashing can provide.

I really don't mind this either as river fishing is much more dangerous for children. They see adults wading for example and think they should do the same or get a spinner caught in a tree and think they can retrieve it.

I have seen a few kids along the river on their own, around 10 or 12 years of age, without adult supervision, which I don't entirely agree with either.

Again, as far as I aware our club books are full with waiting lists to get on in the coming years. I don't think salmon fishing has just popped its clogs yet.
 

Coneheads

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Good to read some A.C.'s have full membership and some with waiting lists,
But Its more the norm ,before the lock down to see most young teenagers having booze ups near riversides, leaving their empty cans and broken bottles and rubbish in the aftermath.
 

dave1959

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Yeah, coarse fishing seems to attract the young ones rather than game, but i suppose it depends on their area and access to fishing where they live. When i was a kid, i enjoyed coarse mainly, but also brown trout fishing on the Yorkshire Esk And Leven. I suppose i was lucky to have both. The thought of sea trout and salmon fishing didn't enter my head, unless i was fishing the Esk at night for eels, and the sea trout started jumping. Then when i got a job, i started to chase sea trout with a spinning rod.
 

Kin36

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There is no doubt that the general effort to catch migratory fish has increased. The younger generation don’t get the concept of doing something for days without the guarantee of action. It is like test cricket. The ebb and flow rather than a few hours of big hits. For me fishing on river the best tonic in the world


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lefthandup

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So does anyone think our rivers are too busy or beats over rodded ?

I'm very much in the same mindset as @Hardyreels on this subject.

Anyone else think there are far too many people fishing for Salmon and is having an adverse affect on runs with too many of the stock being caught sometimes more than once ....along with all the other problems of course?
 

Richardgw

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From the age of about 4 I would go and play across the fields with no problems provided I was back in time for bed. No concerns in those days. Then from the age of 8 or 9 I used to cycle to the River Severn around my home town and fish. The fact I was poaching on some club water and fishing without a licence was irrelevant. No political correctness in those days and no hassle provided I kept off the trout streams or the salmon fisheries. That got me going and I am still at it 60+ years later - fishing that is not poaching .

Nowadays parents are scared to let their kids out of their sight because of concerns about abduction, etc we all hear about through the media. I am talking here about 10+ year olds. Letting 4 to 9 years olds out of their sight and down by a big river is a no no. So no chance or youngster trying to fishing unless their parents also fished. And you wonder why there are less young people fishing today.

Some years ago I was fishing a well known sea trout pool on a famous Welsh sea trout river and a youngster (almost certain a local) wanted to fish the same waterfall pot as myself. I asked him for sight of his club card to which he pleaded ignorance. So I suggested to him that he came back when no one else was fishing. A lad after my own experience whom I didn’t want to put off or upset to the extent that he would take it out on my car.
 

Pompero

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Never seen this problem myself and I’m 25, rivers always seem busy. Think some manufacturers or others who gain financially from fishing are trying to push more people into the sport to expand the market. (Not saying all who shares the sentiment has got a financial stake in fishing)
 
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Tardyrover

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When we where kids we could bike to the pits and local lodges to fish. You need to be driving to get to most of the rivers, maybe that’s a reason?
 

lefthandup

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Never seen this problem myself and I’m 25, rivers always seem busy. Think some manufacturers or others who gain financially from fishing are trying to push more people into the sport to expand the market. (Not saying all who shares the sentiment has got a financial stake in fishing)
This seems to be the case...hence part of that other thread...I don't think it's healthy for our sport.
People pushing for more anglers seem only interested in filling their pockets .

Still Interested to hear from the guys advocating more anglers on our rivers ..there was a few on the other thread...
Could they be from the city ?🤣
 

Isisalar

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The rot set in when the coarse season was abolished on lakes and canals.
Prior to that if you wished to fish March to June you had to take up fly fishing for Trout or sea fishing. With a few exceptions.
Now people can just go to an overstocked Carp puddle and crank virtually tame fish in all day. Progressing from that they can camp out for days waiting for an alarm to alert them to a bigger Carp being self hooked, awake or sleeping.
It's not that easy to catch big Carp and a lot give it up. Check out Gumtree to see how much Carp complete outfits are for sale.
Was great for me as a river angler targeting Barbel mostly. Swims that previously were so heavily fished grass couldn't grow became mostly vacant. Then, unwisely stocked Otters, Signal crayfish, abstraction, EE's etc. started to take effect. Most of the decent rivers I used to fish are now useless, Kennet and Gt Ouse especially.
Get youngsters spinning, fly fishing and catching fish and eventually they'll progress to Salmon fishing, if they enjoy a challenge.
 

KILDONAN

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So does anyone think our rivers are too busy or beats over rodded ?

I'm very much in the same mindset as @Hardyreels on this subject.

Anyone else think there are far too many people fishing for Salmon and is having an adverse affect on runs with too many of the stock being caught sometimes more than once ....along with all the other problems of course?
Seems to me your havin a laugh or trying a wind up,
I thought this thread you started was about it being a dying sport!
 

Slaneysider

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Fishing isn't dying, its the rivers that are dying along with the soil, every Tom, Dick and Harry has a fishing rod now but there is nothing in the rivers to catch, was down the other evening and there was 15 to 20 club anglers fishing a 2 mile stretch for trout and Sea trout , I was on the far side on private fishing, the fish are just not there.
 

Springer

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Children have far more interesting and instantly gratifying things to do than go fishing, it has been that way for a generation now. Its nothing more complicated than that.

Parents engage with their children a lot more than ours did by taking them to all kinds of play clubs, sports teams, swimming, cinema etc etc. My old man put me out the door when I was young and said dont come back until tea time. With a group of similar friends it then lead to long days in the woods or down by the river, trying to catch anything from bees and spiders to rabbits and fish, other than football, fighting and climbing trees that was about all we had to do.
 

lowforcefly

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I don't know about dying ? But it is certainly evolving....what it is evolving into being, good, or bad, depends on what perspective your viewing it from, and what you want from the sport? IMHO
That perspective can be skewed by many factors, but one of the main in my area, being the availability of viable Salmon fishing ?
With most of the river requiring a not inconsiderable initial outlay, for not a great promise of return...even the local clubs are out of the reach of most youngsters, even though a lot of people put in a lot of hard work to encourage them.
When you see experienced, good anglers, walking away from the river, or even from the sport...what chance the newcomer ?
Jumping in a car, driving for a few hours to a water that you don't really know, and don't know if there are any fish to catch...is a potential big leap...and only really for the seriously committed ?

Mel....
 

lefthandup

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Seems to me your havin a laugh or trying a wind up,
I thought this thread you started was about it being a dying sport!
Nah....been said on this forum many times in other threads that the sport needs to be kept alive...getting kids or adults into fishing etc.
I've never understood that, found it quite ridiculous tbh, so I thought I'd ask why?

Here's an example..liked by a good few


I dont see the problem with people promoting salmon fishing. If thats what brings new anglers into the sport then thats fine by me.
As for the pics etc, the guys are running a business guiding, they need to advertise somehow and what better way to do it than a picture of yourself or other anglers with fish. The tackle companies that sponsor them will like to see their gear in the photos and being supported by a big tackle company must help business.

Its just modern day marketing and the way things are done these days. If it brings youngsters to the sport or anglers from other types of fishing its a good thing in my book.
 
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GN

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Barring a recent blip on rod licence sales from the EA the trend for these has been downwards for quite a few years indicating less anglers; unless more fish without one!
 

lefthandup

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Barring a recent blip on rod licence sales from the EA the trend for these has been downwards for quite a few years indicating less anglers; unless more fish without one!
TBH with you...I couldn't give a hoot about England...there are few rivers there I'm interested in...it's what's happening on Salmon and trout rivers in Scotland that interests me.
 
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