Where do we go from here?

goosander

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Unfortunately salmon are not alone in dropping numbers. There just seems to be less wildlife everywhere and the only species that seem to be doing well are the bloody pests like crows, grey squirrels, rats and humans. Salmon have it doubly hard as they spend their life in 2 different environments and as much as we are doing to clean them up and "improve" them neither are particularly great. The ever increasing and out of control human population is affecting everything. Maybe corona virus has come too late to save the planet............
When I think back to my youth the rivers were stuffed with fish. Have seen the Endrick drop quickly and the fish jammed in the pools. In those days there were no freezers so we took for the table what we wanted and the neighbours cat got the rest. The decline in my view started when there was 18-20 miles of drift net per boat out looking for the salmon in the 80-90s. Since then the seals/cormorants/goosanders/otters/man and others have been killing fish greater than they can reproduce. Unfortunately the same applies to grouse/grey partridge/brown & blue hares/woodcock and many others. Not everywhere but most places that I go to. There used to be dozens of caper in the pine woods along the A9. Now only crows/foxes/pine martins etc. and folk wonder how they are scarce.
Bob.
 

goosander

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There are so many variables at each stage of a Salmons life cycle. That it's hard to single out one area alone to be the deciding factor on their demise. Salmon and their prey have been fished hard for many years now & the have never been given a chance to fully recover.

As anglers we can do things though, by making their habitat better and much cleaner. Promoting fish welfare. Whether you're for C&R or against is a personal choice & another debate, but seeing anglers chapping gravid fish isn't helping any river.

Many rivers have poor ecology now, so the fry don't have the food source they need to maintain themselves or their numbers. One of the added bonuses of the Salmon run is that once they have spawned, many die off which is a great source of nutrients to the river. This then contributes to the whole food chain. One of the major reasons they are better off in the river than your freezer.

Predation is a huge issue, but killing predators would only being putting a plaster on things. The prey v predator balance across the world shows you that.

To quote the great Sir David Attenborough "The wild is far from unlimited, it's finite. It needs protecting"
Regarding the parr. We used to get rises in the evening that were like rain with the parr feeding on midges etc. Not seen that for many years now.
Bob.
 

carma2

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I meant in 2013. The Tweed November run was very large. I wonder how they managed to net Autumn fish but not Spring or Summer ones and not Tweed ones? Presumably they had a bit of a puzzle about whether to net August fish?
Tweed must have got lucky but many rivers lost their back end runs that year , especially west coast rivers , since then
the Tweed has lost its run .
You ask some questions I dont have answers to but do you really think the fish were not netted , I do.
 

Nigel Passmore

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Is it down to the lake I fear?

I have to say I was so tempted to post that. For those wondering why see this:


At least generation snowflake didn't have no internet, 3 TV channels and not many more radio stations so it was impossible to avoid being bombarded by stuff like this......
 
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