When the salmon aren't there.

lefthandup

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From a few years back .

The salmon never turned up due to low water,as frustrating as it was I turned back
to fishing for Brown Trout using the dry fly.

I knew from past experience that my wee spate river could hold some good Brownies,but it was a skill I hadn't experienced for about 15 years.

Trout fishing really is a funny old game, kinda cat & mouse with long periods of watching and waiting.
It was the watching aspect that really intrigued myself, almost as if I had thought the big trout had all but disappeared due to my salmon fishing .
When I sat Back ,waited and watched it seemed to all fall back into place...when that small window of opportunity would arise and the odd fish would start taking a fly...normally at dusk.

I soon got the hang of the dry fly again with some memorable trout in some difficult Ly's.....
This one I remember fondly....less than a yard from the bank , I still surprise myself how I managed to cover it.
 

Mattytree

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Nicely done , sadly not done much trout fishing this year but picked up half a dozen or more greedy crackers in big tubes a week or so back, not much fun on a 9# though! Kept thinking about going back for my trout rod but it was but the brownie seasons finished on the Tyne.
 

cgaines10

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Awesome catch mate, well played too, look at the fight in it though! Big browns are clever fish & hardly ever get caught mainly the reason for them becoming so large in the first place.

To pick up on your point about watching and waiting though, I can't stress that enough to newcomers or anglers who are searching for big browns. You really need to watch the water and wait for them to show. Too many rush in as the smaller fish start to feed, which is great sport but it inadvertently spooks the bigger fish.

Patience really is a virtue
 

AlanT

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Yup observation and stealth is the key. If I see a rising trout of good quality I often move into position and just wait.......and wait......and wait, often 20 mins or so. In that time the fish relaxes a little, I relax a little then you get a feel for its 'rhythm' then put a cast over its head a few seconds before you next expect it to rise. I only fish dries for trout now (lazy). I went out with a guy recently, he said I was like a heron, I took it as a compliment 🤣
Some of the places I fish are hard going (Lothians and borders) but I sometimes go out and set myself a challenge to only cast to rising fish. Some nights I think that the river is dead, but if you wait long enough something will give itself away!

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The fly I use 90% of the time, a shucked olive
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Coneheads

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Nicely done , sadly not done much trout fishing this year but picked up half a dozen or more greedy crackers in big tubes a week or so back, not much fun on a 9# though! Kept thinking about going back for my trout rod but it was but the brownie seasons finished on the Tyne.
River Till ? Whiteadder ?
 

lefthandup

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Yup observation and stealth is the key. If I see a rising trout of good quality I often move into position and just wait.......and wait......and wait, often 20 mins or so. In that time the fish relaxes a little, I relax a little then you get a feel for its 'rhythm' then put a cast over its head a few seconds before you next expect it to rise. I only fish dries for trout now (lazy). I went out with a guy recently, he said I was like a heron, I took it as a compliment 🤣
Some of the places I fish are hard going (Lothians and borders) but I sometimes go out and set myself a challenge to only cast to rising fish. Some nights I think that the river is dead, but if you wait long enough something will give itself away!

View attachment 51120

View attachment 51121

The fly I use 90% of the time, a shucked olive
View attachment 51122
That's a cracker ....bet you ain't gonna give the river away ?.
Feel free to pm 😊
 

AlanT

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That's a cracker ....bet you ain't gonna give the river away ?.
Feel free to pm 😊
That one had a little damage underside near the tail probably from a heron in its younger day.

No secret, thats actually the River Almond (the West Lothian one), it is a fantastic dry fly water. I fish it half a dozen times a year, I like it and sometimes stop on my way home from work. The water quality does suffer from its industrial past but it is amazing for dry fly. I fish it near Cramond Bridge Hotel. I've had some great fish over the years, that picture just happened to be on my phone.

I prefer the borders rivers, and they are closer to me, love the Yarrow but the Almond is very underated for brownies. I dont weigh my fish but I've had a lot in the 1.5 - 3lb+ range which is a good marque of fish for a wild brownie in a semi urban area.

I catch a lot of sea trout in it too, hooked a few salmon but not landed any on the trout rod yet.
 

lefthandup

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That one had a little damage underside near the tail probably from a heron in its younger day.

No secret, thats actually the River Almond (the West Lothian one), it is a fantastic dry fly water. I fish it half a dozen times a year, I like it and sometimes stop on my way home from work. The water quality does suffer from its industrial past but it is amazing for dry fly. I fish it near Cramond Bridge Hotel. I've had some great fish over the years, that picture just happened to be on my phone.

I prefer the borders rivers, and they are closer to me, love the Yarrow but the Almond is very underated for brownies. I dont weigh my fish but I've had a lot in the 1.5 - 3lb+ range which is a good marque of fish for a wild brownie in a semi urban area.

I catch a lot of sea trout in it too, hooked a few salmon but not landed any on the trout rod yet.
The Yarrow looks like an interesting river, that's the one that flows out of st Mary's loch ?

Funnily enough my mate went up the loch, flyfishing for pike 6 or 7 weeks ago and caught a salmon.
 

AlanT

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The Yarrow looks like an interesting river, that's the one that flows out of st Mary's loch ?

Funnily enough my mate went up the loch, flyfishing for pike 6 or 7 weeks ago and caught a salmon.
Yes thats the one. Has some nice brownies in it, believed to be Tweed spawners that end up as residents. Has big hatches of stonefly. I used to enjoy fishing the 'gadger' on it. In fact we used to say a 2lb trout was 'an average gadger trout'! Fly only now of course. Contacted a few fresh salmon early in the trout season too, well up the system. Its a long time since I've heard of a salmon coming off the loch.
Its sister river the Ettrick has big trout in it too but its dour and more difficult on the fly, big deep holes etc
 

lefthandup

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Yes thats the one. Has some nice brownies in it, believed to be Tweed spawners that end up as residents. Has big hatches of stonefly. I used to enjoy fishing the 'gadger' on it. In fact we used to say a 2lb trout was 'an average gadger trout'! Fly only now of course. Contacted a few fresh salmon early in the trout season too, well up the system. Its a long time since I've heard of a salmon coming off the loch.
Its sister river the Ettrick has big trout in it too but its dour and more difficult on the fly, big deep holes etc
I'd definitely like a crack at the Yarrow 👍
 
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