What chance do Salmon have

Daventus

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Says it all
 

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chriswjx

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Says it all

Its like having someone building a wall on one side, and someone taking it apart on the other...

Both are marked for "conservation", but no one's seemed to have thought about the consequences of a booming seal population on the threatened marine species that they feed on...
 

SalmoNewf

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On this side of the Atlantic the annual Newfoundland seal hunt used to take about 200,000 to 300,000 pelts a year and the overall population was stable at an estimated 2 to 3 million animals. After the various self described “greens” were finished with it the hunt is effectively dead and the current estimated population of harp seals alone is 7.5 million plus. So of course its just a coincidence that cod populations are at historic lows as well as salmon, which have to migrate through the area inhabited by the seals. As a former Newfoundland Fisheries minister said of the seals “They’re not eating turnips.”
 

Richardgw

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Just remember predator/prey levels go in cycles.

Lots of prey so predator numbers increase – bees around a honey pot.

Predator numbers increase and eats lots of prey reducing numbers. Reduced prey numbers so predator breeding compromised and predator numbers reduce.

Reduced predator numbers so prey species thrive. Etc, etc, etc.

How long the cycles are I will leave that to the ‘experts’.
 

thestump

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i go walking down in findhorn very regularly,3-4 years ago there seemed to about 40 seals on the sand banks where the bay meets the sea,just above this there is a really narrow channel that any salmon must go through in order to run the findhorn or muckle burn,now there seems to be closer to 80 or so seals ,as in a previous post they are not eating neeps
 

Daventus

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Just remember predator/prey levels go in cycles.

Lots of prey so predator numbers increase – bees around a honey pot.

Predator numbers increase and eats lots of prey reducing numbers. Reduced prey numbers so predator breeding compromised and predator numbers reduce.

Reduced predator numbers so prey species thrive. Etc, etc, etc.

How long the cycles are I will leave that to the ‘experts’.
Sorry but fish numbers been dropping for years seal numbers dropped once when they caught some sort of (pox)cycles are ********
 

Andrew B

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Yeah so pretty much as I thought.
Which just goes to show how Chris Packham knew exactly what he was doing when he said that seal numbers are down on winterwatch on the Ythan estuary?
 

scoops

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Yeah so pretty much as I thought.
Which just goes to show how Chris Packham knew exactly what he was doing when he said that seal numbers are down on winterwatch on the Ythan estuary?
Plenty at the Ythan estuary, they have a protected ‘haul-up area’ see them when flying over you’d think an area at the river mouth had been tarred over its that thick with them , nothing to worry about as seals don’t eat salmon/trouts!!!
 

chriswjx

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Plenty at the Ythan estuary, they have a protected ‘haul-up area’ see them when flying over you’d think an area at the river mouth had been tarred over its that thick with them , nothing to worry about as seals don’t eat salmon/trouts!!!

seals are connoisseurs, they only eat farmed salmon...
 

bankwheel

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i go walking down in findhorn very regularly,3-4 years ago there seemed to about 40 seals on the sand banks where the bay meets the sea,just above this there is a really narrow channel that any salmon must go through in order to run the findhorn or muckle burn,now there seems to be closer to 80 or so seals ,as in a previous post they are not eating neeps
Last years count in Findhorn bay was 780, but they can’t just be eating salmon. One positive is the increase in Orca numbers on the Moray firth probably due to the seals
 

Isisalar

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The problem is that they look cute and cuddly like the otters and the Greenoid virtue signallers have a much more effective publicity machine than angling or even the professional fishing industry.
Perhaps the Salmon farmers could put aside a few million fish and the Greenoids could go on Seal feeding boat trips.
 

scoops

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Last years count in Findhorn bay was 780, but they can’t just be eating salmon. One positive is the increase in Orca numbers on the Moray firth probably due to the seals
Are the Orcas round our shores the seal eating or fish eating types, is there not different species that eat different?
 

scoops

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I know one of the Helmsdale Ghillies who watched them hammering the seals just a couple of weeks ago. He said they were throwing the seals 30’ in the air

plenty eating available for them down the east coast then
 

thestump

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Last years count in Findhorn bay was 780, but they can’t just be eating salmon. One positive is the increase in Orca numbers on the Moray firth probably due to the seals
didn't realise there was that many ,i also must admit that i like seeing them pop their heads up when am walking round the bottom of the bay (y)
 

wormo

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won't need to worry about seals as in around the next 10 years fishing for salmon will be pretty much over , seals and febs are emptying our rivers from top to bottom, yes there are other factors but predation is the most easily controlled, but salmon and sea trout ,I fact most fish have zero % protection
 

goosander

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won't need to worry about seals as in around the next 10 years fishing for salmon will be pretty much over , seals and febs are emptying our rivers from top to bottom, yes there are other factors but predation is the most easily controlled, but salmon and sea trout ,I fact most fish have zero % protection
Need to get the Rewilding gang and get them on the case.
Bob.
 

Geordieboy

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Prey-Predator cycle thing. The more predators, the more food and the like. I am as precious as any with what few salmon we have, but it does seem like the Orcas are playing their role. I don't know what the answer is. Watching YouTube (font of all knowledge I know), they monitored smolts in the SPEY and 50% of them were expiring in the river before they even got to sea.
The seals can't just be feeding on the salmon. But if they are, then it'll take Mother Nature some time to get that balance right unfortunately. They do like shoaling fish, and I know that Mullet are far more prevalent than they were. Seals would hunt Mackerel and Herring when they were around our shores in vast numbers before we took them to the brink.
 

Andrew B

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makes You wonder how many seals the nets men were culling when they were in operation?
You know on the Dwyfor when the fish are about as there’s often two or three seals at the river mouth.
course it’s not their fault, same applies with all the fish eating birds but the thing is way out of balance imo?
 
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