We Will Remember Them

noeyedeer

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This is my Grandfather 1895-1979 who signed up in 1915 as a ‘driver’ , army service corps (1st Battallion Tyneside Scottish)

I’m told he handled the horses pulling the gun carriages (see spurs in pic), a post brought to life in the movie ‘War Horse’. He had been trained on the horses, working for Viscount Grey of Fallodon Hall.

He also served in Egypt from where I have another photo stamped ‘Cairo’

I have his green kitbag plus a khaki one with the troopship name on the side, also his medals:



And found his sign up papers online:




I knew him well as a boy but he never discussed his time at war.

1st Tyneside Scottish were on the Somme, one of the first into action. This map shows their location plus a mention from the Northumberland archives:

The 1st Bn Tyneside Scottish were positioned in trenches near Ouvillers, flanked on the left by 2Bn The Middlesex Regiment and on the right by 4th Bn Tyneside Scottish. Whistles blew at 0731hrs and the pipers started to play the “Haughs of Cromdale” – men walked forward, in open countryside, to cross the 800 yards towards the German lines………

 
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ozzyian

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Imagine if all the ordinary people in Britain, Ireland, France and Germany in 1914 would have said to the politicians and the establishment, we are not going, go yourself.

Just a thought.

or even a 'just explain why again'

All the pals battalions forming excited for a great adventure, a quite unbelievable contrast in reality really.
 

Loxie

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Original pic :



This is my Grandfather 1895-1979 who signed up in 1915 as a ‘driver’ , army service corps (1st Battallion Tyneside Scottish)

I’m told he handled the horses pulling the gun carriages (see spurs in pic), a post brought to life in the movie ‘War Horse’. He had been trained on the horses, working for Viscount Grey of Fallodon Hall.

He also served in Egypt from where I have another photo stamped ‘Cairo’

I have his green kitbag plus a khaki one with the troopship name on the side, also his medals:



And found his sign up papers online:




I knew him well as a boy but he never discussed his time at war.

1st Tyneside Scottish were on the Somme, one of the first into action. This map shows their location plus a mention from the Northumberland archives:

The 1st Bn Tyneside Scottish were positioned in trenches near Ouvillers, flanked on the left by 2Bn The Middlesex Regiment and on the right by 4th Bn Tyneside Scottish. Whistles blew at 0731hrs and the pipers started to play the “Haughs of Cromdale” – men walked forward, in open countryside, to cross the 800 yards towards the German lines………


My Grandfather on my fathers side also fought at the Somme. At the outbreak of War he signed up as a private in the Canadian infantry but by the Somme had been promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. He took part in a 2 company attack and at their objective he was the senior surviving officer. Only 76 men made it and most were wounded. He finished the war as an acting wing commander in the RAF, via becoming a fighter ace in the RNAC. His brother, who signed up with him as a private, finished the war as a general!!

Sadly the family have lost his medals. I saw one at auction at Sotheby's but it had already sold. My maternal grandfather fought in every infantry campaign the British army took part in in the second war. During yesterday's commemoration both my parents marched with the British Legion in their local parade, my mother wearing her father's quite impressive medals, my father with only his own and looking a little sad by comparison. It would be great to get them back but I fear now impossible.
 

AlanT

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I attended the theatre production 'Far Far from Ypres' at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh last night.
The show has been on tour for a number of months but was planned to finish in Edinburgh on Remembrance Sunday to commemorate WW100. Fantastic show, very moving and also very educational.

Far Far from Tpres 900px width 560 .jpg
 

para1

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My grandad made it. God bless you Wullie or my lot wouldn't be here. He passed on in 1961. R.I.P. and thanks.
 

Editor

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You'll see I have deleted the posts that had started a debate over how the war has started, etc. Let's please keep this a respectful thread of remembrance only and continue to enjoy the personal stories and photographs being shown. Sadly I have none of either of my grandfathers. I only know my own father said his dad never talked about it which speaks volumes I think.
 

Safranfoer

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For my great grandad Norman, a WW2 seaman who was captured as a prisoner of war after his ship was destroyed by the Japanese. He never said a single word about his experience, but the photographs on his release tell their own story. We will not forget.
 
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I have no family of note who forfeited their life or freedom so that I may live free to do what and when I choose. I will however never forget the sacrifices made by so many to make the world a better, richer place. I thank them all for what they did. I thank those too that served in more recent times and gave up life or limb to protect these very same freedoms. You will never be forgotten either.
 

Paul White

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My avatar shows some of my heroes....the women who are largely forgotten.

This picture shows Pauline Gower and some of the original women known as the "ATAgirls"; ladies who flew replacement aircraft to the operational bases throughout the UK. Not just single seater a/c like the Spitfire and Hurricane but 4 engined bombers like the Stirling, Halifax and Lancaster.

I also pay tribute and give heartfelt thanks to the women of SOE (Michael MCX Fisher's mother was one), many of whom, in F(French) section, gave their lives after unspeakable treatment from the Nazi regime if they were caught. Those who did survive had very difficult lives after the war's end and couldn't cope with peacetime. A reminder that wars reap their harvest of terrible sadness, despair and unhappiness long after they have ended.

My prayers and never forgotten thoughts to all those affected by war, not just at Remembrance time but throughout the year. Let us be truly thankful for all the things we have, and be forever grateful we have men and women who were and are prepared to pay the ultimate sacrifice!!

Thank you Simon for resurrecting this post each year!
 

AlanT

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My avatar is my wifes grandfather Pte David Tod.

My wife and her relatives have been researching his final resting place for a number of years. He was a Royal Scot who joined the Suffolk Regiment voluntarily to support the war in Asia. He died in the battle of Imphal and Kohima.

The family has recently heard from the Second World War Imphal Campaign Foundation. They are confident that they know of his location and are very close to recovering his remains in remote jungle. A phenominal feat by dedicated people, something the family had never dreamed possible after all these years, widely believing that he was lost forever.
His story was recently featured on the ITV news.

My father in law is in his 80's and in failing health, it would be amazing if they could find his father and bring Pte Tod home

https://www.itv.com/news/2020-10-05...a-battle-that-turned-the-tide-of-wwii-in-asia
 
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Shug Wilson

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On November the 7th 1920,in strictest secrecy, four unidentified British bodies were exhumed from temporary battlefield cemeteries at the Aisne,Marne,Cambria,Somme,Arras & Ypres None of the soldiers who did the digging were told why.

The bodies were taken by field ambulance to GHQ at St-Pol-Sur-Ter Noise.
Once there their bodies were draped in the Union Flag.

Sentries were posted and at midnight Brigadier General L.J. Wyatt and Lt Col. E.A.S Gell of the Directorate of Graves Registration and went into the chapel alone.

The remains were on stretchers,each covered by a Union flag: the two officers did not know from which battlefield any individual body had come.
General Wyatt with closed eyes rested his hand on one of the bodies. The two officers placed the body in a plain coffin and sealed it. The other bodies were taken away for reburial.

A company from the 8th Infantry Regiment recently awarded the Legion d'Honoure en masse stood vigil overnight.

On the morning of the 8th November two undertakers entered the castle library and placed the coffin into a casket of the Oak timbers of trees from Hampton Court Palace.

The casket was branded with Iron and a medieval crusaders sword chosen by the King personally from the Royal collection,was affixed to the top and surmounted by an iron shield bearing the inscription :-

'A British Warrior who fell in the Great War 1914-1918 for King and Country.


On the 9th of November the casket was placed onto a French Military wagon drawn by six black horses. At 10.30 am all the church bells of Bolougne tolled;the massed trumpets of the French Calvary and the bugles of the French infantry played Aux Champs (the French Last Post).
Then,the mile-long procession led by one thousand school children and escorted by a Division of French troops -made its way down to the harbour.

At the quayside, Marshal Foch saluted the casket before it was carried up the gangway of the destroyer, HMS Verdun (L93) and piped aboard with an Admirals call.

The Verdun slipped anchor just before noon and was joined by an escort of six Battleships. As the flotilla carrying the casket closed on Dover castle it received a 19 gun Field Marshal's salute. It was landed at Dover Marine Railway Station at the Western docks on the 10th November and was taken ashore to a train by a bearer party of six Warrant Officers from the 3 services and escorted by two Generals, two Admirals and two Air Marshall's.

The Coffin was then carried to London in South Eastern and Chatham Railway General utility Van no 132. The van has been preserved by the Kent and East Sussex Railway.
The train went to Victoria Station, where it arrived at platform 8 at 8.32 pm that evening and remained overnight under escort of the 1st Battalion of the Grenadier Guards (A plaque at Victoria Station marks the site: every year on the 10th November a small remembrance service take place between platforms 8 & 9).

The following morning 11th November 1920, (exactly 100 years ago in 2 days time) the casket covered with the Union Flag,on which was placed a steel helmet and side arms, was then placed onto a gun carriage of the Royal Horse artillery drawn by six horses and led by a Firing Party and Regimental bands of the Brigade of Guards,which then set off through immense and silent crowds.
As the cortege set off,a further Field Marshall salute was fired in Hyde Park.

The route followed was Hyde Park,The Mall, and to Whitehall where the Cenotaph a "symbolic empty tomb", was unveiled by King George V.
At the Cenotaph the carriage halted and the King laid a wreath of roses and bay leaves ( the Poppy Appeal did not begin until 1921) on the coffin.

After the two-minutes silence the gun carriage continued to Westminster Abbey followed by the King,the Royal Family & Ministers of state.
Outside the Abbey and flanked by a guard of 100 recipients of the Victoria Cross the coffin was borne by NCOs from the Brigade of Guards into the the West Knave.The funeral service consisted of music from only English composers.

At the conclusion of the last hymn, the helmet and side arms were removed and the coffin laid in the tomb.The King scattered earth from a Silver shell case and the VC holders filed past either side of the grave.

The service was the mourning of the nation,the honours that had been paid were those due to a Field Marshall.

The guests of honour were a group of about 100 women. They had been chosen because they each had lost their husband and all their sons in the Great War.

The idea of the unknown warrior was thought of by a Padre called David Railton who had served on the front line during the Great War the union flag he had used as an alter cloth whilst at the front, was the one that had been draped over the coffin.

It was his intention that all the relatives of the 517,773 combatants whose bodies had not been identified could believe that the Unknown Warrior could very well be their lost husband ,father,uncle,brother or son.

This is the reason we we wear poppies

We do not glorify war.

We remember - with humility-the great and ultimate sacrifices that were made,not just in this war, but in every war and conflict where our service personal have fought-to ensure the liberty and freedoms we now take for granted.

Every year on the 11th of November we remember the unknown warrior.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them.









 

SalmoNewf

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My paternal grandfather, age 17, after volunteering and joining the London Scottish in February, 1917. On reaching France he was transferred to a regular battalion of the Gordon Highlanders. He survived, served in the army of occupation until late 1919, returned home and completed his apprenticeship, begun at age 13, as a scientific instrument maker. His two older brothers also survived. The family was not so lucky the second time around...his eldest brother was killed in the Blitz and his next younger, a regular in the Grenadier Guards, was wounded on the beach at Dunkirk and succumbed to his wounds two weeks later. My maternal grandmother had two brothers. One was in the Navy and was lost at Jutland the other joined the army, was badly gassed in France and died as a result in 1919.

My paternal grandfather was too young but his three elder brothers all went as volunteers from the then Dominion of Newfoundland. The eldest, an ordained CofE minister joined the Navy as a chaplain and was lost when the small boat carrying him between ships to conduct a funeral was swamped. The other two joined the Royal Newfoundland Regiment. One was killed at Cambrai, the other survived but struggled with what we know know as PTSD for the rest of his life.

We do remember them.
 

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Safranfoer

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I've been researching my great-grandfather this weekend and found his military record. He served in the Royal Marines in the Bangka Strait, attached to HMS Repulse. I know from my grandma that he was on board a ship that was sunk and swam to safety, then was captured. HMS Repulse was taken out by the Japanese on 10 December 1941, but according to his military record, he wasn't captured until 10 March 1942, when he was taken to the labour camp in Palembang. I don't know if the sinking my grandma referred to, is of Repulse or not.

The camp he was liberated from was Serangoon/Malai 2, on 15 November 1945. This must have been where he was when he worked on the Burma railway, as I've read other POWs at this camp worked on the line and I know my great-grandad did - though details of his life are scant, for reasons I shall come onto.

I can't access any of the records of the camps mentioned - they're paper-based and held in Kew.

It really does make you think hard about the sacrifices made to protect us all from fascists. Thank you just isn't enough...

He was born in 1920 and died in hospital in 2016, aged 93. These parts I remember. He had a military funeral, with flag-draped coffin and The Last Post played by two military bugle men who had driven up to the Midlands from Portsmouth to send him off. That was incredibly moving. No one in the family ever spoke of his experiences in the war, at his request. He was in his early twenties during his time in the Japanese POW camps, and he met and married my great grandma in the same year, 1954. It caused a family scandal as he was much, much younger than his new bride - a divorcee who already had one child the same age as my great-grandad. As a result there was always a great big cloud over the pair of them, and the stories I should know and be proud of are lost now.

Anyway. A reflective weekend.
 

Handel

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Quoted post removed as it was reported as not being in the spirit of the thread topic.

There are some police forces that are embarrassed at what they are being asked to do at the moment. Sadly the Met are not one of them.
 
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keirstream

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The sun has now gone down on the 11th day of the 11th month and I'll leave you all with this sobering pair of photographs.
Camerons.jpg


You will all probably recognise the iconic ramparts of Edinburgh Castle.
The top photo was taken as the Cameron Highlanders embarked to France in 1914.
The bottom photograph was taken on their return after the end of hostilities in 1918.
Lest We Forget.
 

mows

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Both my grandads kind of survived WW1 and my dad came home with a semi paralysed arm from Monte Casino.
My dad never missed attending the memorial on remembrance sunday.
Even once he wasn't really able.
It's a shame he passed away before he could see what the ladies guild have done to the Fettrie Mercat cross for remembrance.
 

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