waddington or tubes

the_laird

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hi guys, what's your preference waddington or tube fly and please give reason for choice.
many thanks Tam.
 

Invermarnoch

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Well, I think the Waddington has certain advantages in small sizes, in that one can make the body very slim, but new tube fly material from Grays of Kilsyth brings even that advantage into question. The one thing I've never found entirely satisfactory with Waddington's is the fact that the treble can sometimes be difficult to replace. On the other hand the Waddington stays put while sometimes the silicone at the hook end of a tube sometime slides down the hook shank - a serious irritation. I think too that with a Waddington you can lash some lead wire down on top of the upper part of the split of the shank before tying on the body which can be advantageous in ensuring a correct swimming attitude. Overall, I think this is a matter of personal choice. Tunes are so easy to tie which has made me lazy I suppose and I always put on the hook after tying the flies on Waddingtons, which always involved some manipulation with pliers. I would still use tiny Waddingtons for sea-trout in the summer.
 

Eminem

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Tubes for me all the way. The advent if super slimline stainless steel tubes from Grays of Kilsyth and the huge range of shapes and sizes available from Eumer means I never need to look at waddingtons again.

Cheers.
 

the_laird

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tubes or waddintons

hi abk,
would ,you be so kind as to elaborate on what you feel these advantages and dissadvantages are please .
regardsTam.
 

ballingall512

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Tubes give you greater variety than waddies, you can tie one pattern on plastic/alu/brass copper/tungsten, in varying lengths from 1/4 inch to 3 inch. to cover any condition

Then add coneheads if required, to keep the fly swimming on an even keel, and to help cut through the water.

For the weight or lack of it in waddingtons they do cut down through the water nicely, and allow for a slim profiled fly, which means easy casting with a reasonable sink rate. However for me the sheer range that can be accomodated on the hundreds of various tubes,and there ever increasing applications like turbo discs and skaters, needle tubes, tungsten tubes and cones etc outweighs any advantages once held by the waddington.

Again this is only my opinion I know plenty of people that swear by waddingtons, and at the end of the day if you have confidence in what you are fishing, it's half the battle.:)
 
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ABK

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The first and obvious advantage that tubes have over Waddingtons is that they slide up the line and do not get chewed and damaged by fish. Some anglers like the hook on Waddingtons to be held in place so that it articulates when playing a fish. Others like the hook to be rigid and fixed in position. Regardless of which method is used, fish hooked on Waddingtons, can and do at times try and use the shank as leverage to work out the hooks. Waddington shanks in the smaller sizes from my experience seem to be very easily bent and damaged. Another advantage with tubes is that this does not happen. In addition to this you can mix and match tubes of different sizes weights and dressings by sliding one down the leader on top of another.



Tubes come in a variety of materials ranging from plastic right through to tungsten. As such you can tie tubes in a wide range of weights and sizes to suit a wide variety of water conditions. This gives them great versatility. Any pattern though which can be tied on a tube can also be tied on a Waddington. Having made the previous comments about tubes, Waddingstons, although sligthly more time consuming to prepare, (attachment of hook) before tying, from my expereince however, seem to have an altogether more alluring profile / presence in the water. I think this is mainly due to the thinner body which produces a slimmer more see through fly. Due to this I sometimes think that they can often appear more attractive to fish. As for one being better to cast than the other. This is purely subjective, based on the conditions at the time, fly line, leader length, leader thickness, wind etc.... I am not convinced about them cutting through the water better than tubes either. The heavier "Brora" shanks may sink quick, but generally Waddingtons seem to settle down into the flow rather than fall through it. The bouyancy of bucktail on standard narrow wire Waddington shanks appear to give them more life in the water than the equivelant sized and weighted alloy tubes. They may size for size and dressing for dressing settle deeper than a plastic tube, but, not a brass, copper or tungsten type. I have found most metal tube type tubes of similar length, when fished in the same flow, with the same line, and leader material, found the Waddington to fish slightly higher in the water. There are times when I have opted to fish a tube, saw it swimming and changed to a similar sized Waddington. There have also been times when I have done the reverse. It is about liking what I see and how it is reacting in the water. If only given the choice to use either Waddingtons or tubes for the rest of my fishing life I would opt for the tube. However if I was not allowed to use a Waddington I would feel I was missing something from my armoury.......A great deal with salmon fishing is using what you are happy with. Tubes overall probably have more advantages than Waddingtons, but I dont think Waddingtons should be ignored. Sometimes I am happy using one but not the other. As such I like to cover my options when I go fishing and have a selection of each............


 
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goosander

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With that selection of flies i would lose my confidence in choosing the right one.
Now a days i just stick a few gold bodied Willy Gunns in a couple of sizes in a plastic tube and that does me. Just a case of sticking what size i fancy on.
Still catch as many as anyone but boreing when sitting at the fly tying bench.
 

ABK

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I never take this many on to a river. These are just "stock" boxes.
Before going down to fish I take a look at height and colour and then just put five or six in total into a small box which have worked for me in the same conditions previously...... Cant stand tying more than three flies at a time...I find it positively boring. Usually discover that I give more flies away in a season than I actual decide to use. Mostly go to folk that turn up to fish with the wrong sizes for the conditions.....



 
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the_laird

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waddingtons or tubes

hi guys,

thanks again for all your informative responses. i also use both and my only concern with using larger waddingtons was could the shank lever against the hook in the fish in bigger waters. i also like the profile of smaller waddingtons for use in summer spates, i also agree todays advances with tube flies.. ie cones, discs etc, gives us endless variables and choices. So i suppose it all boils down to personal choice and knowledge of the river you are fishing at the time.

many thanks for your replies guys,
tightlines tam
 

rapala55

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Hi I can see the benifit of these slim tubes from Greys of Kilsyth,just wondering what you lads use to hold the hook in place.
 

Gordy000

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They sell a cheap vice to hold the tubes. It does a job but stops you from tying on the last 3mm or so of the tube. I personally use a sewing needle held on the vice. I buy one of those multi packs of needles in the round holder so I can pick the size of needle to suits.
 

bassfly

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Hi I can see the benifit of these slim tubes from Greys of Kilsyth,just wondering what you lads use to hold the hook in place.
I use a stinger style trailing hook with a plastic piece of tube heat stretched to form a knot guard that buts up against the bottom of the tube. Very easy to make and fashion to your requirements. There is a company that makes them but cant remember the name.
 

Saint Andrews

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Waddington's for me but I am bias as my surname name is Waddington, decended from generations of Salmon fishing Waddington's… Seriously I use both, mostly tubes if I'm honest but there is something special about Waddingtons, they swim differently and I prefer them when I want to get the fly down a bit in faster water.
 

rapala55

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I use a stinger style trailing hook with a plastic piece of tube heat stretched to form a knot guard that buts up against the bottom of the tube. Very easy to make and fashion to your requirements. There is a company that makes them but cant remember the name.
hi thanks
 
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