Tuna off East Devon beach

GeeBee

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In the channel ? On their way to the med for the winter, munching on anything that moves.

great to see.
 

BlennyBoy

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Around 700 bluefin tuna have been caught, tagged and released by the 15 registered boats this season. Fish range from 250 up to 800lbs. That is in the English Channel alone. When you add the 20odd Irish boats who have been doing equally well, this is one of the best tuna fisheries in the world. It will generate lots of needed cash for the fishing industry down in the west country. Lets hope it lasts, but I hear there are 30+ japanese boats outside Irish waters waiting to net them up.
 

Andrew B

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Around 700 bluefin tuna have been caught, tagged and released by the 15 registered boats this season. Fish range from 250 up to 800lbs. That is in the English Channel alone. When you add the 20odd Irish boats who have been doing equally well, this is one of the best tuna fisheries in the world. It will generate lots of needed cash for the fishing industry down in the west country. Lets hope it lasts, but I hear there are 30+ japanese boats outside Irish waters waiting to net them up.
Seriously there are Japanese boats in on this just outside of Irish waters? Had no idea of this but I can well believe it, which saddens me no end to hear of.
I’ve been to the Tunney museum in Scarborough, which showed the past time of the rich and famous going out in small boats with rod n line for huge Tuna.
Sadly as the herring stocks went so did the Tuna but still it’s always a buzz to see some crazy hardcore fishermen with a huge Bluefin Tuna off Ireland. Same goes for Thresher Sharks and The fastest of them all the Mako shark.
 

BlennyBoy

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It is potentially a huge winner for the west country if they (tuna) dont get decimated. The recovery of BFT gives you hope for the future. Lets hope salmon could do the same.
 

Lamson v10

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Screenshot_20211124-210940.png
 

meyre

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Seriously there are Japanese boats in on this just outside of Irish waters?


Asian interest in Nth Atlantic BFT. 'Fraid so ...where ever Tunny can be had so these boats will go.
Now in Las Palmas Canaries there are 7 Japanese boats like the Fukuyo Shimaru and Takatyo Maru, 3 Chinese, Chan Rong, Jin Feng + Jin Sheng and sundry Russian and Norwegian boats . Typically these are c.60 m liners or trawlers .
The Chinese have above 16,000 distant water fishing boats ( their Government admits to but 2,600 ) and they often fish 'blind' ie without GPS turned on. They form a large part of the world's IUU fleet ( Illegal Unreported Unregulated ) and answer to none but their government for whom they form a 'soft' , informal, extension to Chinese policy . Their target species are cephalopods and general pelagics/baitfish for meal processing. If they can beat the Japanese to the tuna they will.
 

sewinfly

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It is potentially a huge winner for the west country if they (tuna) dont get decimated. The recovery of BFT gives you hope for the future. Lets hope salmon could do the same.

They will get decimated ,we done it before many years ago and it will happen again.
God knows how long it takes to grow to some of those sizes.
Pity we can't protect them and leave them alone.
 

chriswjx

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Seen some videos of folk fly fishing for them, and looks amazing... Would be brilliant if the UK stocks got to the point to allow recreational angling, but think I agree with most that these are gonna get battered by the commercials...

Either that or a trip to Ireland is in order...
 

ibm59

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When I was on the Lochboisdale - Oban run , shoals of tuna could regularly be seen between Hyskeir and Ardnamurchan.
‘Mainly in the late summer /early autumn , when the water is at it‘s warmest.
 

Roag Fisher

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They were in Broad Bay north of Stornoway early November for the last few years. No sign this year, and very few around Lewis. Most of them seem to have gone up the English Channel. I watched a couple of videos of scientists fishing for (and catching) BFT in the Baltic ( I think, if not then close to).
 

nickolas

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The sad thing about catching these wonderfully powerful fish and then putting them back into the ocean the survival rate of line caught fish is low. It’s a known fact the GTs once released find a hole to recover in some cases for up to three days, which then makes them very susceptible to other predation.
 

charlieH

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The sad thing about catching these wonderfully powerful fish and then putting them back into the ocean the survival rate of line caught fish is low. It’s a known fact the GTs once released find a hole to recover in some cases for up to three days, which then makes them very susceptible to other predation.
The Angling Trust would disagree with you on survival. They reckon the mortality rate is below 5%, which is at least comparable to, if not lower than, the figures generally given for salmon. I'd have thought that on that basis a rod-and-line recreational C&R fishery, using appropriate tackle, is quite justifiable.

 

nickolas

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The Angling Trust would disagree with you on survival. They reckon the mortality rate is below 5%, which is at least comparable to, if not lower than, the figures generally given for salmon. I'd have thought that on that basis a rod-and-line recreational C&R fishery, using appropriate tackle, is quite justifiable.

I can if you like provided evidence of a tagging program undertaken over several years in the pacific on GTs, The difference in the pacific is fly caught and tropical water, in the Atlantic cooler water and powerful gear, so maybe the Atlantic Tuna has a better survival rate. The only time I have seen game fish foating floating down streem in front of me is on the Rio grande with large sea trout, probably being caught up stream on wt 5 trout rods. I have seen tarpon being released any quickly devoured by a hammerhead.
 

BlennyBoy

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The sad thing about catching these wonderfully powerful fish and then putting them back into the ocean the survival rate of line caught fish is low. It’s a known fact the GTs once released find a hole to recover in some cases for up to three days, which then makes them very susceptible to other predation.
Not so, (see CharlieH)the catch and release tagging is operated with a very low mortality rate of around 5%. It seems that a lot of 'fake news' around this subject and certainly when you talk to those in the know, if the fish are handled correctly and release quickly after catching, then they are fine.
see below:

 

charlieH

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I can if you like provided evidence of a tagging program undertaken over several years in the pacific on GTs, The difference in the pacific is fly caught and tropical water, in the Atlantic cooler water and powerful gear, so maybe the Atlantic Tuna has a better survival rate. The only time I have seen game fish foating floating down streem in front of me is on the Rio grande with large sea trout, probably being caught up stream on wt 5 trout rods. I have seen tarpon being released any quickly devoured by a hammerhead.

I don't doubt your evidence wrt GTs, but I think one has to be cautious in exptrapolating across different species (what might be acceptable handling practice for carp certainly won't be for salmon) and conditions (cool v warm water).

I've never fished for GTs, but have a friend who has done it quite a bit. Given the extreme physicality of the fight and the frequency of tackle failure, I've sometimes wondered whether going after them with even the most powerful fly rods is appropriate - or is it like your sea trout caught on 5wts? In a responsibly run C&R fishery it seems to me essential that you use tackle that is capable of landing fish in a reasonable timeframe.
 

nickolas

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I don't doubt your evidence wrt GTs, but I think one has to be cautious in exptrapolating across different species (what might be acceptable handling practice for carp certainly won't be for salmon) and conditions (cool v warm water).

I've never fished for GTs, but have a friend who has done it quite a bit. Given the extreme physicality of the fight and the frequency of tackle failure, I've sometimes wondered whether going after them with even the most powerful fly rods is appropriate - or is it like your sea trout caught on 5wts? In a responsibly run C&R fishery it seems to me essential that you use tackle that is capable of landing fish in a reasonable timeframe.
I would think 500lb + fish on rod on line would be fairly exhausted once brought along side the boat, I would like to see the data from tagged tuna and there survival rates if it’s available, It could be useful at a later date.
 

Andrew B

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They will get decimated ,we done it before many years ago and it will happen again.
God knows how long it takes to grow to some of those sizes.
Pity we can't protect them and leave them alone.
I know it’s different cultures n all that but I’ve always said I can leave Japan and China off my holiday list. Aside from all of the obvious naughty stuff like tiger nobs ect, they seem to have a natural inclination for over egging stuff toput it lightly.
I’m pretty sure re these Tuna, that they are a prized luxury food item that cost thousands and so it’s an elite bunch who are consuming these fish no?
Don’t even get me started on shark fin soup as the penchant for that stuff has seen a global trend in just about every third world country, where these poor people can make money to satisfy the demand for friggin soup😡

I’m not blind to our own standards either but squeamish or no, there does seem to be a difference in cruelty over there?
 

The Flying Scotsman

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I know it’s different cultures n all that but I’ve always said I can leave Japan and China off my holiday list. Aside from all of the obvious naughty stuff like tiger nobs ect, they seem to have a natural inclination for over egging stuff toput it lightly.
I’m pretty sure re these Tuna, that they are a prized luxury food item that cost thousands and so it’s an elite bunch who are consuming these fish no?
Don’t even get me started on shark fin soup as the penchant for that stuff has seen a global trend in just about every third world country, where these poor people can make money to satisfy the demand for friggin soup😡

I’m not blind to our own standards either but squeamish or no, there does seem to be a difference in cruelty over there?
I wonder what the huge fan base BTS the Korean pop band has would think if they realised that the Koreans are only lately just talking about stopping eating dogs and the dog meat industry.
I’ve worked out what BTS stands for now. I did think it stood for Blatant Total Shite but it’s actually
Border Terrier Scoofers.
Think their albums called
50 ways to wok your dog :ROFLMAO:
 

Andrew B

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I wonder what the huge fan base BTS the Korean pop band has would think if they realised that the Koreans are only lately just talking about stopping eating dogs and the dog meat industry.
I’ve worked out what BTS stands for now. I did think it stood for Blatant Total Shite but it’s actually
Border Terrier Scoofers.
Think their albums called
50 ways to wok your dog :ROFLMAO:
Lol exactly this
 
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