Ticks - the wee devils!!

Tyke777

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I was up on the west coast last week for a couple of days, it was short notice so Jarvis the Cocker had not been prepared sadly. fished Friday, Saturday and back Sunday (1 small fish and a couple of Sea Trout :thumb:)

So far I have removed 18 ticks from him!! horrible things they are - I am back up to the western isles in a month for a weeks fishing with him, hes got to come, he loves it so what is the best and most effective treatment I can get for him, any suggestions?

Many thanks in advance

Malcolm
 

carbisdale caster

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Thanks for the heads up CC, could be an interesting watch - there should be more awareness about these horrible things, and everything that goes with them.

Absolutely, I pulled about a dozen off the dog in February. I often see lots of folk walking about up this way in shorts and sandals to go round the forest trails, I try to warn folk but you’d think the forestry would at least put up signs on their properties
 
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Tyke777

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Absolutely, I pulled about a dozen off the dog in February. I often see lots of folk walking about up this way in shorts and sandals to go round the forest trails, I try to warn folk but you’d think the forestry folk would at least put up signs on their properties

At least with Chest Waders you stand half a chance :cool:

Fair point, do Forestry Commissions ever put up signage on trails??
 

DonnieH

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Not sure if they work but the last time I was at the vet with my dogs they tried to sell me a collar that stops them.
 

Safranfoer

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Look out for symptoms of Lyme disease - my springer has never been the same since she contracted it, and it’s v difficult to test for as the parasite needs to be present in the blood sample they happen to take for a conclusive diagnosis. It wasn’t in Merle’s so she was diagnosed by elimination.

Her symptoms were shifting muscle weakness, drooling, inability to settle/constantly shifting, and raised temperature.
 

Jack Holroyd

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Look out for symptoms of Lyme disease - my springer has never been the same since she contracted it, and it’s v difficult to test for as the parasite needs to be present in the blood sample they happen to take for a conclusive diagnosis. It wasn’t in Merle’s so she was diagnosed by elimination.

Her symptoms were shifting muscle weakness, drooling, inability to settle/constantly shifting, and raised temperature.

Tick bites are very common. When infected with Lyme the bite site is ringed like a bulles eye.
 

Jack Holroyd

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Tick bites are very common. When infected with Lyme the bite site is ringed like a bulles eye.

Go straight to your GP and tell him you suspect Lyme. I have had two friends contract Lyme. One has recovered over 6 months , the other is still struggling after 10 years. Horrible
 

williegunn2

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It was suggested to me that if you pull off a tick, place it in a plastic bag in the freezer, with the date. If you get any symptoms including the bulls eye, take the tick to the doctor, ticks are much easier to test than humans.
 

heather point

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If you are removing them, do NOT attempt to pull them straight out. You will leave the poisonous mouth parts in your skin.
Get the O'Tom tick remover which is two different sizes of plastic hooks which you hook under the tick and then twist to remove it.
It will then come out cleanly.
 

seeking

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Presumably I'll make myself even more unpopular were I to point out that, of all these synchem biocides that threaten the environment, tick poisons are some of the worst ones you can introduce to our river systems...

:rolleyes:

Wasn't it on the Spey recently where the upper tributaries recorded shocking levels of these (salmon-killing) biocides? All because of someone's dog having a bath. Walkers, eh?

They'll be telling us Roundup's harmless next.

Love my dug, but it's just a dug.

I had tick bite fever once... life kills.

Take it easy out there, but remember as ever, natural organic (;)as opposed to biocidal organic chemistry) is best, if not easier :cool:
 
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Invermarnoch

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Tick Remover

Well said, Peter.

The excellent tick remover which you mention can be found at some vets' surgeries. I invested in one packet some time ago but don't need to use it since my vet prescribed a gel which is applied to the back of my dog's neck where it cannot be removed by licking. As he is due a new dose soon, I do not have any left and cannot recollect its name.


Should your vet supply the gel, the tick remover would not become altogether redundant. I find it useful for tying muddlers, in that it can be applied over the first thread wraps of the muddler head thus separating the tips of deer hair (which are to become the wing) from the base of the fibres, before cutting them. This prevents accidental cutting of the hair wing. You can, as an alternative, use a grooved plate cut from plastic food packaging, but I find that I always lose mine, so I always keep the tick removers handy in my plastic tool box. They are also useful for packing deer hair onto a hook shank if you are tying bombers etc.
 
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Feugh

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Not sure if they work but the last time I was at the vet with my dogs they tried to sell me a collar that stops them.

Seresto tick and flea collar. Yes, they work well but i'm not convinced that they work for the full 8 months that is advertised. We put one on the dog when the weather starts to warm up enough for the ticks to become active (around March this year) and we'll keep an eye on whether she starts getting ticks from July onwards. If she starts picking up ticks I'll probably get the monthly tablets that the vet is now selling.
As for us humans, an o'tom tick remover or the British Deer Society tick remover (which is a handy, credit-card sized thing) is what I use. I have a remover in the car, in my wallet and in the house, just so that I know that I'll always have one on me.
 

myriad

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I treat my dogs with a tablet from the vet,it lasts 3 months unlike frontline which if the dog goes in the water loses its effectiveness.The tablet is into the bloodstream and if a tick bites it dies and you don't end up having to pull them off.
Not had a problem with mine since putting them on it years ago.Seems to be a bit of a secret from thevet though.They are not cheap but are cheaper than lymes and future vet bills.

Best remover I have had is called the Otom 3 sizes and takes the head out which is important.Always carry one in case for myself.
 
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