This can only be a good thing

westie4566

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The return of the Sprat to the Clyde in huge numbers must be a good thing for Salmon and Seatrout on the west coast, hope they spread out around our coasts.
I remember Macduff harbour literally silver with herring sile when I was a youngster.
 
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GeeBee

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Good news. I wonder how much of that is clean water, and how much is the trawlers being kept in port ?

As we know, bass and mackerel catches from the shore are way up this summer - saltwater sea trout too, from what i overhear...

It is good to see though that the powers that be are finally realising that with no herring, sprats or sandeels to feed on, the ground fishery is unsustainable.
 

SOS

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I remember Macduff harbour literally silver with herring sile when I was a youngster.
I also remember in the 70s a large shoal of Herring in Aberdeen harbour, and people catching them with bare hooks because they were so thick in numbers, those were the days before the harbour and piers were closed off to the public.
Just hope these Sprats are not trawled for and turned into fish pellets for the fish farms.
 

PatK

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Sprats when dyed golden used to be a great trolling bait, Hardys and most of the major tackle makers used to sell special rigs that you could mount them on to give a slow wobble or spin, that was very attractive to salmon. I'm not sure but if my memory is correct, Georgina Ballentyne used one to catch the UK record salmon on the river Tay.
 
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nickolas

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That’s some of the best news I’ve heard in years, let’s hope they are allowed to increase in numbers without being exploited. Apparently the pod of Orcas in the north west are infertile due to pcb’s, so it’s the end of the line for that particular pod.
 

keirross

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Sprats when dyed golden used to be a great trolling bait, Hardys and most of the major tackle makers used to sell special rigs that you could mount them on to give a slow wobble or spin, that was very attractive to salmon. I'm not sure but if my memory is correct, Georgina Ballentyne used one to catch the UK record salmon on the river Tay.
Yes, I do believe that's what happened on Tay, I don't know why I didn't try it at all on the places I fished. Back then
 

keirross

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You cut me off mid sentence!^. ...back then, sprats were legendary stuff partic if they had the hue! It mattered a big if they'd got that glassy look!

You really want/need fish spp to not follow natural therm lines - get a big fizzin grip.
 

salmo76

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The return of the Sprat to the Clyde in huge numbers must be a good thing for Salmon and Seatrout on the west coast, hope they spread out around our coasts.
I think the BBC has this wrong : imo. the inner clyde ecosystem is a complete basket case and nothing of real effectiveness has been done to improve it since all the scientific reports , since its demise ( now approaching 40 years ) , pinpointed the blame on intense over fishing of all the fish stocks. Trawling and dredging continues unabated right up to the shorelines , albeit it is now for prawns and shell fish , with all the tons of dead, discarded , marine by catch that entails along with destruction of the sea bed. Worse still , there is now a fairly recent inshore razor clam fishery in operation removing tons of clams , mainly by electro fishing. Could the removal of all these filter feeders along with the continued destruction of the sea bed in the inner clyde be having an adverse effect on water quality ? Here is a recent news report that highlights some of the problems being experienced on the inner clyde : -


Could the huge explosion in sprat numbers be due to the absence of the huge predation by birds and fish that normally takes place during the annual migration of sprats inshore that occurs every late spring and summer ? Is this plankton bloom affecting the inner clyde due , in some way , to man made degradation of a fragile eco system over many decades , resulting in these strange events we are now witnessing ? Is it , rather than a good thing , a sign of worse to come ?
 
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