the north sea drift netters still exist

marty31

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having been told umpteen times the north sea nets are finished this year and we all can expect far bigger runs as a result, I thought I was seeing things when passing alnmouth bay and saw the same cobles fishing the same births as previous years, close to the shore where the salmon are well known to hug, even one owner told me at the start of the year that it was completely finished this year, after enquiring about it I was told, yes the salmon netting is finished, but they were all fishing with altered nets for sea trout, and returning the salmon??????
 

Loxie

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having been told umpteen times the north sea nets are finished this year and we all can expect far bigger runs as a result, I thought I was seeing things when passing alnmouth bay and saw the same cobles fishing the same births as previous years, close to the shore where the salmon are well known to hug, even one owner told me at the start of the year that it was completely finished this year, after enquiring about it I was told, yes the salmon netting is finished, but they were all fishing with altered nets for sea trout, and returning the salmon??????

Ah yes, that will be EA logic. Obviously no salmon will be harmed. You couldn't make it up!
 

NEbody

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The drift nets are finished and most of the (beach) T nets in Northumberland finished at the end of May. There is a limited trial at five berths, monitored by the EA, of a modified T net design that’s supposed to catch sea trout but allow salmon to escape. The byelaw changes that closed the drift nets and limit the T nets are aimed at salmon.
 

scoops

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The drift nets are finished and most of the (beach) T nets in Northumberland finished at the end of May. There is a limited trial at five berths, monitored by the EA, of a modified T net design that’s supposed to catch sea trout but allow salmon to escape. The byelaw changes that closed the drift nets and limit the T nets are aimed at salmon.[/QUOTE

how do you make a net that lets salmon escape and catch sea trout? Not like can have bigger mesh size to reduce bycatch and smaller mesh than normal would still do damage?
 

Rrrr

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Seen pictures of what they were landing the other day at the fish quay and it was shocking.

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Mattytree

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Was doing surveys at whittly bay on Monday and could not see any off the sea front at tyne mouth when we went for lunch.
There is maybe visibly more fish about I recon though..bit of a joke though considering the sea trout I feel are in decline and the salmon are on the up that the nets have had their quota upped for sea trout.
 

Rrrr

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Was doing surveys at whittly bay on Monday and could not see any off the sea front at tyne mouth when we went for lunch.
There is maybe visibly more fish about I recon though..bit of a joke though considering the sea trout I feel are in decline and the salmon are on the up that the nets have had their quota upped for sea trout.
They are working the south side of south shields pier mate so chances are you wouldnt have seen them from where you are as he sets right along the pier.

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Mattytree

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Ahh makes sense , used to seeing at least two boats in that area working.. the alnmouth one is a a bit of a disgrace seeing that the aln and coquet are hardly recovering rivers.
 

The flying Scotsman

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I heard the baliff isn’t allowed on the boat to inspect his catch so all he has to do is hide the salmon that’s meant to go back.
 

Rrrr

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I heard the baliff isn’t allowed on the boat to inspect his catch so all he has to do is hide the salmon that’s meant to go back.
The coastlines huge and as remote as you can get in places so you could land fish anywhere and no one would know to be honest.

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long Preston

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Was doing surveys at whittly bay on Monday and could not see any off the sea front at tyne mouth when we went for lunch.
There is maybe visibly more fish about I recon though..bit of a joke though considering the sea trout I feel are in decline and the salmon are on the up that the nets have had their quota upped for sea trout.

not sure I would agree that seatrout are in decline or that salmon are on the upmay just be the area I fish but these past 2 seasons have seen far less salmon and far more seatrout-in fact I would go as far as saying that there are a lot of seatrout in the river
 

NEbody

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The North Esk baliffs are not allowed to inspect the boats unless they are invited on. They have no authority to go on themseves.

I think once bitten’s comment is because EA bailiffs who police the North East England nets do have that authority.
 

Rrrr

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not sure I would agree that seatrout are in decline or that salmon are on the upmay just be the area I fish but these past 2 seasons have seen far less salmon and far more seatrout-in fact I would go as far as saying that there are a lot of seatrout in the river
The problem is that salmon must enter the nets, even if returned the seals working the nets will pick them up in seconds so although not landing salmon the nets are still having an effect on the salmon numbers.

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Grassy_Knollington

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The problem is that salmon must enter the nets, even if returned the seals working the nets will pick them up in seconds so although not landing salmon the nets are still having an effect on the salmon numbers.

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I’m sure the nets are still killing salmon indirectly just like they used to kill them directly. That said, does anyone really still believe that they are affecting overall numbers of fish in most of our river systems?
 

Rrrr

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I’m sure the nets are still killing salmon indirectly just like they used to kill them directly. That said, does anyone really still believe that they are affecting overall numbers of fish in most of our river systems?
I suppose it depends where you fish really as its only really the tyne, coquet and wear directly affected and to some degree tweed fish in transit. Thats not to say there isnt bigger issues to deal with but for the coquet it feels like the perfect storm of fish decimation from all angles.

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Grassy_Knollington

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I suppose it depends where you fish really as its only really the tyne, coquet and wear directly affected and to some degree tweed fish in transit. Thats not to say there isnt bigger issues to deal with but for the coquet it feels like the perfect storm of fish decimation from all angles.

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And of those rivers it’s really only the coquet where the nets would seem to be in a position to affect the numbers - because of where they are located. Even before the ban they were taking a fraction of what they used to take and it’s still not resulted in an upturn in runs.

Anyway been through all this before , tight lines and hope you stop a few at the bottom. Got 3 days on the N Tyne in August and got my fingers crossed for no heatwave
 

marty31

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And of those rivers it’s really only the coquet where the nets would seem to be in a position to affect the numbers - because of where they are located. Even before the ban they were taking a fraction of what they used to take and it’s still not resulted in an upturn in runs.

Anyway been through all this before , tight lines and hope you stop a few at the bottom. Got 3 days on the N Tyne in August and got my fingers crossed for no heatwave
it affects the river aln as the nets cover the mouth it also is well known that all the salmon heading for east coast Scotland hug close to the shore, right on the netting berths, i have got no doubt someone will tell me that these new nets can distinguish between say a 4lb seatrout and a 4lb grilse, what morality rate has the returned fish? what it really means is the nets still do exist, and are not in anyway finished.
 

Rrrr

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it affects the river aln as the nets cover the mouth it also is well known that all the salmon heading for east coast Scotland hug close to the shore, right on the netting berths, i have got no doubt someone will tell me that these new nets can distinguish between say a 4lb seatrout and a 4lb grilse, what morality rate has the returned fish? what it really means is the nets still do exist, and are not in anyway finished.
Yea i left the aln, wansbeck and blyth out to keep it simple as they do get the odd fish but not in any great numbers, the aln dosent stand a chance the way its netted. The stell that fishes the south side of south shields pier must make an absoluter killing the way the nets are set along the pier wall as the fish have no choice but to head that way.

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marty31

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Yea i left the aln, wansbeck and blyth out to keep it simple as they do get the odd fish but not in any great numbers, the aln dosent stand a chance the way its netted. The stell that fishes the south side of south shields pier must make an absoluter killing the way the nets are set along the pier wall as the fish have no choice but to head that way.

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the aln is a classic example of how a great little river has been ruined, in the eighties it fished early and got a good run of prime spring salmon ore often producing a springer or two on the opening day often before its big brother the coquet, then good runs given water, I remember one year it produced a 21 pounder,and the next a 23 pounder, solid sealiced fish later it produced a good seatrout and salmon run increasing right until the season closed, now its not even worth paying for the licence, all but fishless, a good little river ruined
 

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Net catch has reduced gradually over 60 years at an average of ~ 10% per year.
So for every season there has been a reduction, and for the season where the nets are finally off, the reduction in netting has been negligible compared to the normal year on year fluctuations.
So of course we will never feel the impact of the nets coming off in any given season.
That doesn't mean there has been no impact.

I prefer to think of it the other way round...if next season we reinstated every legal and illegal netting station from 1960 and allowed them to take as many fish as they want (was there any quotas in 1960?) does anyone really believe we would not see a significant reduction in rod catch next season compared to this?
 
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