The Close Season What You Doing Today Thread?

Safranfoer

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The tits have hatched! I can’t upload video but they are LOUD.

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Rrrr

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Hope you can keep magpies at bay, I've seen them take every chick from a brood as they attempted to leave the nesting box

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Ive been watching a duck on the coquet for About 3 weeks now. She started out with 11 chicks and was down to 4 or 5 tonight when i passed. Not sure whats having them but spotted otter footprints in the area and seen the odd stoat.

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ian74

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Ive been watching a duck on the coquet for About 3 weeks now. She started out with 11 chicks and was down to 4 or 5 tonight when i passed. Not sure whats having them but spotted otter footprints in the area and seen the odd stoat.

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Mink take young ducks but nowt troubles the young goosanders‼️
 

Rrrr

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Mink take young ducks but nowt troubles the young goosanders
Dont think weve got any mink on the river these days, ive not seen any signs of them anyway. Only other culprits i could think would be a fox or a heron but with so many sheep farms lambing in the area i would think foxes are being kept under controll.

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seeking

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Hope you can keep magpies at bay, I've seen them take every chick from a brood as they attempted to leave the nesting box

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To be fair, magpie's have got to eat, especially when they have young too. Canny things, magpies.

And of course there's the other argument that in feeding birds in the garden, and providing artificial nesting and an easy life you're encouraging the predators (trout ponds and inland cormorants and all that...). Circle of life.

Probably not the argument to have on this forum mind...
 

budge

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To be fair, magpie's have got to eat, especially when they have young too. Canny things, magpies.

And of course there's the other argument that in feeding birds in the garden, and providing artificial nesting and an easy life you're encouraging the predators (trout ponds and inland cormorants and all that...). Circle of life.

Probably not the argument to have on this forum mind...
Yep I agree nature isn't all cute and fluffy. There does seem to be an overabundance of magpies though, certainly where we live.

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salarchaser

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To be fair, magpie's have got to eat, especially when they have young too. Canny things, magpies.

And of course there's the other argument that in feeding birds in the garden, and providing artificial nesting and an easy life you're encouraging the predators (trout ponds and inland cormorants and all that...). Circle of life.

Probably not the argument to have on this forum mind...
Ive no issue with wildlife eating. Its when they decimate it becomes an issue.
We have a few magpies around us which systematically empty any nest in our barn.
2 clutches of collared dove were done for.
Found eggs and chicks on the floor, so not all eaten.
Its the issue with mink. Killing for killings sake.
The decrease in mink numbers on the rivers I fish seems to have coincided with the increase in otters.
 

Auldghillie

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To be fair, magpie's have got to eat, especially when they have young too. Canny things, magpies.

And of course there's the other argument that in feeding birds in the garden, and providing artificial nesting and an easy life you're encouraging the predators (trout ponds and inland cormorants and all that...). Circle of life.

Probably not the argument to have on this forum mind...
They certainly are and successful at adapting to increased urbanisation. The latter seems to suit blackbirds, despite ample magpie numbers. I miss song thrushes, they seem to lose out to blackbirds, maybe they need more cover. Or there’s another issue such as slug pellets - anyone know ?

Love to watch magpies recover their buried loot. AG
 

Rrrr

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Out for a wander this morning and mother duck was out and still has the 4 chicks. Spent 30 mins bridge gazing and nothing but a small shoal of escapee perch spotted.

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Safranfoer

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They certainly are and successful at adapting to increased urbanisation. The latter seems to suit blackbirds, despite ample magpie numbers. I miss song thrushes, they seem to lose out to blackbirds, maybe they need more cover. Or there’s another issue such as slug pellets - anyone know ?

Love to watch magpies recover their buried loot. AG
I have a pair of song thrush and a pair of blackbirds in my garden. The blackbirds are nesting in the side hedge; I don’t know about the song thrush as I see them less frequently. They’re nesting somewhere close though as they pull up the moss between my patio slabs. Saves me a job. They’re relatively new ‘residents’ and I put it down to having recently dug out two new flowerbeds. My soil is full of worms and now they’re much more easily accessible. I don’t use any slug pellets or any other chemicals in the garden either. I have copper tape to keep slugs away from precious things - but I don’t get many/any slugs or snails. Probably because of the blackbirds and song thrush... ;-)

My garden has loads of ground cover and established mature hedges. It’s why the rats love it... Plus I created a pond, big log pile and hibernaculum area. It’s rat paradise. Oof.
 
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Auldghillie

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I have a pair of song thrush and a pair of blackbirds in my garden. The blackbirds are nesting in the side hedge; I don’t know about the song thrush as I see them less frequently. They’re nesting somewhere close though as they pull up the moss between my patio slabs. Saves me a job. They’re relatively new ‘residents’ and I put it down to having recently dug out two new flowerbeds. My soil is full of worms and now they’re much more easily accessible. I don’t use any slug pellets or any other chemicals in the garden either. I have copper tape to keep slugs away from precious things - but I don’t get many/any slugs or snails. Probably because of the blackbirds and song thrush... ;-)

My garden has loads of ground cover and established mature hedges. It’s why the rats love it... Plus I created a pond, big log pile and hibernaculum area. It’s rat paradise. Oof.
I’ve loads of snails but only an occasional Songy. Blackbirds in plague proportions and I suspect their aggression is an issue.
 

Safranfoer

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I’ve loads of snails but only an occasional Songy. Blackbirds in plague proportions and I suspect their aggression is an issue.
Ah... my next door but one neighbour has a plague of crows. They’re beautiful and I love watching them in her tree - really gothic when they’re all hanging out - but nothing much else feathered ventures into her garden. They’re proper bullies.

At my first house I had a very stroppy pair of resident blackbirds. They’d fly up and drop stones on us when we were outside to try and scare us out of our own garden. The blackbirds we have here are more mellow. It’s the robin that’s aggro. Tiny. Clears the pond when he comes marching out barking his orders.
 

seeking

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Ive no issue with wildlife eating. Its when they decimate it becomes an issue.
We have a few magpies around us which systematically empty any nest in our barn.
2 clutches of collared dove were done for.
Found eggs and chicks on the floor, so not all eaten.
Its the issue with mink. Killing for killings sake.
The decrease in mink numbers on the rivers I fish seems to have coincided with the increase in otters.

Sure. One man's "decimation" is another's "normality" of course.

Corvid intelligence is one of the reasons dumb species like pigeons and doves have adapted to use multiple breeding attempts every year, year in year out, in order to pass on their genes.

Maybe rather not let's conflate alien invasives, like mink which should be totally exterminated, with natives like magpies and otters that can impact on invasives, that's another can of worms. Jury out on whether collared dove is "alien" or just another beneficiary of generalism (they were of course very rare when I were a lad), but either way those magpies won't have made a dint in it's inexorably successful range expansion...

Red in tooth and claw, but perhaps we've forgotten that we can't keep everything alive forever...
 

salarchaser

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Sure. One man's "decimation" is another's "normality" of course.

Corvid intelligence is one of the reasons dumb species like pigeons and doves have adapted to use multiple breeding attempts every year, year in year out, in order to pass on their genes.

Maybe rather not let's conflate alien invasives, like mink which should be totally exterminated, with natives like magpies and otters that can impact on invasives, that's another can of worms. Jury out on whether collared dove is "alien" or just another beneficiary of generalism (they were of course very rare when I were a lad), but either way those magpies won't have made a dint in it's inexorably successful range expansion...

Red in tooth and claw, but perhaps we've forgotten that we can't keep everything alive forever...
Nature can be cruel.
Usually things settle into balance.
Its no good a predator killing all of its prey. Where does feed for the next generation, or even the next year, come from?

I agree that you cant keep everything alive.

In plants, a weed is only a weed if it grows where you dont want it to.
Grass on soil is a lawn. Grass in your drive and its a weed.

Everyone wont be happy with every situation.
Its what appeals to individuals.

Personally, I'd prefer to see collared doves in my rafters.
A personal choice.

Just as I cant see decimation as being normal.
 

peterchilton

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surely the 'wild magpies' are overwintering in greater numbers due to the increased road kill left behind by the 'wild' automobiles. All very natural.
 
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