Terminology

rytenuff

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It must be very confusing for the beginner when the length of mono attached to the fly is referred to as the leader by some experienced anglers and as the tippet by others.
e.g. If it is a PolyLEADER then what is the length of mono attached to it which terminates in a fly?
To me it is the tippet.
I've had this discussion/argument with several local anglers who insist that I'm wrong. (Davie :) )
Google says:
"Tippet is a specific gauge monofilament line that is attached to the end of the leader, to which you tie the fly. The tippet is usually the smallest gauge line on your rig and is virtually invisible to the fish. ... By tying on tippet, you can avoid losing taper. The fly is tied to the end of the tippet."

Isn't Google wonderful......when it agrees with you. :D:D:D

Just trying to feed the forum with topics until the fish appear.....if ever!
 

Rrrr

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Polyleader with leader tied on the end works for me.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

noeyedeer

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Things that can go on the end of the line:
Tip
Leader
Tippett

Tip: most often where there is a short head or shooting head and the tip is inter changeable to affect e.g. the sink rate of the front-end of the flyline, so mostly that means it is forming part of the casting structure of the fly line.

Leader: can be Poly leader or more traditional mono leader. Can be tapered in either case or can also be level. E.g. level mono or more often level T stuff ( tungsten).

Tippett: a length of lighter strength material be it nylon, mono, copolymer, fluorocarbon take your pick!
Tippett can be floating or sinking material and is generally similar so as to be less visible and more compliant to allow the fly some movement And to turn over at the end of the cast.

You can just stick a length of mono on the end of the line and it covers the job of all three.
You can also stick it on the end of a tip for example and not have the poly leader in the middle.
Introducing the other components in sequence provides more sophistication to the way the whole outfit casts
 
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noeyedeer

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noeyedeer said....etc.


....aye, but what do you call the bit that the fly is attached to? :noidea:
No idea! Lol

Based on the above, probably tippet, or leader if the only length added to the line.

Unlikely you’d attach a fly to a tip.....
 

MCXFisher

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rytenuff is right indeed. It's ridiculously confusing.

To me, everything beyond the end of the line is the LEADER. How you assemble your LEADER offers all manner of options: for example, it can comprise a polyleader (or VersiLeader if you're from Idaho) onto which you need to add a bit more leader material, which you can also call TIPPET (not a term that has ever appealed to me) that we used to call NYLON. if we don't put a polyleader onto the end, then the leader is entirely composed of NYLON (or TIPPET material if you insist).

I think I understand, but for a novice it must be horribly confusing, especially as all anglers are anarchists at heart, and change the nomenclature randomly. Meanwhile the tackle manufacturers have joined the game, and being commercial, they've leased random word generators to populate the text of their catalogues. Sage, being American and bigger, have also leased a hyperbole generator, pre-set on Turbo. If anyone can correctly divine the characteristics of a rod from what it says in the catalogue or on the website they deserve a prize. There's a special extra prize if you can detect what has actually changed between one generation of Sage rods and the next.

here's a taster:

"The new [blah] rods let you experience the remarkable benefits of [blah technology] through access to the more powerful lower sections of the rod, allowing for easier and more efficient load carry through the casting stroke.

The [blah] is equipped with an ultra-fast action high line speed taper to carry large amounts of line at distance with wind cutting performance. Perfect for long traditional or scandi lines and, or winter Skagit heads with heavy sink tips and flies."


Bah, humbug, elderly harrumph :wow:
 

Loxie

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No one's said cast!!

When I grew up we used "cast" for the bit between the line and the fly. Ample scope for further confusion!

I use leader for the bit between line and fly. For me this usually consists of a tapered section and a tippet. For clarity I refer to the tapered section as a leader as well! A standard salmon leader for me might be made up from a 9' tapered leader to a 13lb point with a 4' 12lb tippet.

For some trout fishing, straight line buzzers especially, the tippet will be considerably longer than the tapered section.
 

lowforcefly

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Cast, for me, was a, multi, wet, trout fly leader. I usually bought pre made for two or three wet flies, think they were marketed as a 'Cast'... Racine Tortue, Fog, etc. Usually with the 'Snood' point occurring at each taper position. Each snood was the final connection to the fly, and the lowest BS. You could use the 'Tag end' at each diameter reduction as the snood, which helped to stop tangles, but didn't enhance presentation.
Don't know if this applies to salmon, as never fish more then one fly...I can create enough mayhem with one !
Don't bother now, use .....'Ermmmm...Tippet rings?'
Leader could be either 'Tapered' utilised to turnover on long leaders, for presentation / dry / small flies, or parallel for shorter lengths / bigger dries/ wets.
But all still leaders, from fly line to fly !
Polytips / Versatips, etc. brought us 'Tippet !' parallel section of line from Poly. Vers. to fly.:lol:
Whether they are an extension of the fly line...or part of the leader is ??:noidea:

mel....
 
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noeyedeer

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Gut, anyone?
Depends I guess how far back we go?

I inherited a Forrest of Kelso greenheart rod with brass reel complete with “catgut” line etc plus one fly - still got the rod, reel and fly, but alas the line didn’t survive!!
Provenance from my great uncle who was gamekeeper at Chillingham for Earl Tankerville.
 
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meyre

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Noeyedeer

That 'Forrest of Kelso greenheart rod with brass reel' must have taken many fish...do you have the records to go with it?

As for leader does that make Mr Trump a tippet?
 

noeyedeer

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Noeyedeer

That 'Forrest of Kelso greenheart rod with brass reel' must have taken many fish...do you have the records to go with it?

As for leader does that make Mr Trump a tippet?

No, it was handed to my dad to fish with by his uncle.
Lost my dad in an RTA when I was 7 (I'm now nearly 60) so can only go off what my mother recalls!

The rod has a repaired tip so we reckon it may have belonged to Lord Tankerville and discarded (for my dad to use) due to the damage.
He apparently took it to Alnwick - to a mate at Hardy's many years ago who said it wasn't a salmon rod, so possibly for sea trouting?
I think from memory it's about 14ft, v thick at the butt with fold down rings. Currently snug in a rod bag my dad had made plus a tube I got from a coarse fishing shop.
 
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Andy Musgrove

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What’s Important !

I guess terminology is as much about where you hail from and how you came to fishing. Older anglers like myself tend to call the whole bit off the end of the fly line the “cast”. I got that from my Grandfather when I was a nipper 50 odd years ago. It starts getting confusing for some people with the advent of shooting heads with interchangeable tips for various depths etc but for me they are still part of the fly line and not the cast. A tapered or straight leader, home made or bought, is part of the cast. Most people tie on a section of line that then gets tied to the fly. As flys are changed this bit gets shorter until it’s too short so is replaced with a new bit. Tippet is a trout fishing term I believe (I fish more trout than salmon) but my honest opinion is most of these things are created by the manufacturers to catch the angler not the fish. I remember about 40 years ago asking an experienced angler a daft question because I didn’t know but wanted too, he scoffed and was very aloof at my lack on knowledge. When I told father he advised me that actually the guy has to use the toilet the same as the rest of us and 99.9% of other fishermen would be happy to take the time to explain. Knowledge does not equal power, knowledge is there to be shared.
 

noeyedeer

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Just checked the advertorial book that got me inspired to take up rod & line as a teenager ‘Hardy’s aid to Angling” 1966 (given to me by my uncle’s mate who was a Hardy’s sales rep alongside an ex demo rod & Viscount reel - my first ‘modern’ kit)

Contributors are Captain TL Edwards (London School of casting), WF Hardy, JL Hardy.

The stuff that goes on the end of the fly line is mostly referred to as leader, sometimes cast but never Tippett

 
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