TAY RECORD SALMON & Propensity for large fish capture by ladies

Handel

Well-known member
Messages
2,235
Reaction score
641
Location
London
On that note then, so if I hook onto the fish whilst harling, and I overplay it too hard, then its the ghillie who lost the fish as well? 😅

Surely as the person who ultimately plays the fish, you should be credited at least jointly with the boat pilot?
Well I don't want to put words in the gillie's mouth but I think he might suggest you had lost his fish😊.
 

Handel

Well-known member
Messages
2,235
Reaction score
641
Location
London
I will say though, I was watching the series "Icelandic Tails" on Amazon, and they had a 94 year old woman called Lilla Rowcliffe on one episode. They regale the viewer with her picture book of stunning catches, and there's some proper massive catches in it and from all over the world.

Thing is, her dad was the fella who started up Royal Dutch Shell, so she's able to basically live fishing for as long as she's liked.

From just a cursory search on the interweb about those 3 ladies who hold the current records, Georgina Ballantine's dad was a Ghillie, Lady Burnett was a Lady (duhhhh me), and whilst I can't find much about Mrs Morrison the one article I read interviews the family Chauffeur so presumably the family weren't hurting for dosh...

So, would it be plausible that these historical records were more likely to be taken by women, as during the time women were considered more for the home and especially with the wealthier levels more "idle" and thus had more time on hand to chuck a line out?

At the same time, my missus had a better catch record every time we fished together...
Miss Ballantine was by the time she caught her fish a nurse at the local hospital. I believe I read somewhere that the fish went to the kitchen of that hospital and was used to feed the patients. That said she had lived on the beat for a lot of her life and certainly knew what she was doing.
 

Auldghillie

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
276
Miss Ballantine was by the time she caught her fish a nurse at the local hospital. I believe I read somewhere that the fish went to the kitchen of that hospital and was used to feed the patients. That said she had lived on the beat for a lot of her life and certainly knew what she was doing.
There’s a menu on here re Heroes which lists Georgina Ballantine and most of the story. Bit sad, poor mite, she deserves the credit I think.

 
Last edited:

Handel

Well-known member
Messages
2,235
Reaction score
641
Location
London
There’s a menu on here re Heroes which lists Georgina Ballantine and most of the story. Bit sad, poor mite, she deserves the credit I think.

Thanks for that, not heard all that before. I hadn't realised that at one stage they got out of the boat. And I hadn't realised her problems with arthritis. As you say, a bit sad. Yep I think she deserves the credit. Those were the days, a fresh run cock fish of that size in October. The great thing too was that lots of people were interested in the catch.
 

Auldghillie

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
276
Thanks for that, not heard all that before. I hadn't realised that at one stage they got out of the boat. And I hadn't realised her problems with arthritis. As you say, a bit sad. Yep I think she deserves the credit. Those were the days, a fresh run cock fish of that size in October. The great thing too was that lots of people were interested in the catch.
If you Google Calderwoods old book, pre Miss Ballintine, he’s a few pages on big Tay Salmon. Some from the Firth nets. Maybe try searching “ Hathi Trust “ under his name. I haven’t reread the scale work but these fish were multi-spawners I think.

But there’s conflict elsewhere on gender of these brutesl I reckon loss of North Sea herring is a factor in their demise. AG
 
Last edited:

Loxie

Well-known member
Messages
10,938
Reaction score
1,578
Probably the best source for information on the Tay late 19th and early 20th Century is PD Malloch. All the really big fish were maiden Cocks. Large Autumn salmon were a feature of the late 19thc in the Spey and Dee as well as the Tay and the Tweed presumably in many other rivers too.
 

Loxie

Well-known member
Messages
10,938
Reaction score
1,578
A reprinted first hand account of the record salmon in this month's Field.
 

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
9,494
Reaction score
2,952
An experienced Ghillie once told me that he put the success of female anglers down to the fact that women more often cast within their comfortable range and as a result have generally better presentation. Where blokes try to cast to the horizon and half their casts land in a heap...,,
I have a copy of the book CharlieH shared a link to - Salmon & Women: The Feminine Angle. The foreword is by Hugh Falkus, and he muses that women are better at casting because we have good strong wrists from all the vacuuming. He wasn't kidding, either.
 

Loxie

Well-known member
Messages
10,938
Reaction score
1,578
I have a copy of the book CharlieH shared a link to - Salmon & Women: The Feminine Angle. The foreword is by Hugh Falkus, and he muses that women are better at casting because we have good strong wrists from all the vacuuming. He wasn't kidding, either.
I think he was. A bit.. In my experience as a ghillie I'd say women were often more successful than their husbands because they listened to, and acted on, advice more readily. The really good anglers tended to leave their husbands/wives at home though.

The pheromone nonsense led to some very usual behaviour!! A mate and I had a cunning plan to tie flies from, well, ladies hair (it was twenty five years ago before the current fashion precluded such patterns.) On the Tweed gentleman anglers would keep their tube flies wrapped in their wives underwear. Those were the days!
 

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
9,494
Reaction score
2,952
The book reaches a similar conclusion, from memory - women tend to follow advice, the pheromone stuff isn't really proven.
 

Auldghillie

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
276
I think he was. A bit.. In my experience as a ghillie I'd say women were often more successful than their husbands because they listened to, and acted on, advice more readily. The really good anglers tended to leave their husbands/wives at home though.

The pheromone nonsense led to some very usual behaviour!! A mate and I had a cunning plan to tie flies from, well, ladies hair (it was twenty five years ago before the current fashion precluded such patterns.) On the Tweed gentleman anglers would keep their tube flies wrapped in their wives underwear. Those were the days!
Hope they wore shoplifters drawers Or is it draws ?
 

Auldghillie

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
276
What tales I could tell if this wasn't a family forum!
Do they get the flies out when they say “ walk on “ to their Ghillie ? Often wondered why they say that then disappear into the bushes.
 
Last edited:

Dandy angler

Active member
Messages
354
Reaction score
65
Location
Stirlingshire
I think he was. A bit.. In my experience as a ghillie I'd say women were often more successful than their husbands because they listened to, and acted on, advice more readily. The really good anglers tended to leave their husbands/wives at home though.

The pheromone nonsense led to some very usual behaviour!! A mate and I had a cunning plan to tie flies from, well, ladies hair (it was twenty five years ago before the current fashion precluded such patterns.) On the Tweed gentleman anglers would keep their tube flies wrapped in their wives underwear. Those were the days!
A technique I have used myself, also eating prawns and tuna so my hands would smell of fish/sea when I was tying up my fly casts . It maybe worked 🤔. It was around 8 years ago and there were loads of fish around . My daughter had a salmon on her first outing with me when she was 8 years old. ( that was 25 years ago) So must be something in it all though 🎣.
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Messages
868
Reaction score
687
I had understood that Miss Ballantine was harling and that her father was rowing the boat. Is that story not correct?

How Miss G. W. Ballantine Landed the Record Tay Salmon.

By HERSELF.

 

keirross

Well-known member
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
119
Location
In a cooling North Atlantic...
I've often stopped at Caputh brig and the pool setting across beats kinda on the way to Pitlochry. It's hard water to contemplate whot you mite do. It was, apparently, landed in approaching darkness some ninety minutes later some distance downstream.

Probably the best source for information on the Tay late 19th and early 20th Century is PD Malloch. All the really big fish were maiden Cocks. Large Autumn salmon were a feature of the late 19thc in the Spey and Dee as well as the Tay and the Tweed presumably in many other rivers too.
Thanks for the info. Didn't grilse make the market about 1902?
 

keirross

Well-known member
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
119
Location
In a cooling North Atlantic...
I'm waiting for Safranfoer to hook her beast. It's bound to happen sooner or later.
John Ashley Coopers great book, 'Great Salmon Rivers of Scotland', includes a great interview with the captor her self inc times and distances and just how it got landed about in darkness. It's a great read and about how it was displayed outside Mallochs, Tay Street, Perth, the following day hung on a balance to wit the assembled crowd that couldn't believe could've been landed by a woman.

She stopped by the following morning then walked off up the street knowing she wouldn't have been believed...

Testimony varies, of course, but that's the interview as per author. There're quite a few big houses up around Tay, etc. that contain very big stuffed fish apparently caught by birds.
 

firefly

Well-known member
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
402
Location
Belgium
John Ashley Coopers great book, 'Great Salmon Rivers of Scotland', includes a great interview with the captor her self inc times and distances and just how it got landed about in darkness. It's a great read and about how it was displayed outside Mallochs, Tay Street, Perth, the following day hung on a balance to wit the assembled crowd that couldn't believe could've been landed by a woman.

She stopped by the following morning then walked off up the street knowing she wouldn't have been believed...

Testimony varies, of course, but that's the interview as per author. There're quite a few big houses up around Tay, etc. that contain very big stuffed fish apparently caught by birds.
Not sure if we're talking about the same lady.
 
Top