Taking a dook

The flying Scotsman

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Everyone on here probably without exception will have taken a dook at some point over the years.
What's the worst dook you have taken?
Mines was yesterday.
I was wading around this tree with quite a fast flow around it, I was holding onto a branch to keep me in the higher shallower part of the bank when it snapped then my foot slipped of the higher part and into the fast flowing deeper part.
At this point I was in and battered my knee that I've just had an operation on. I dropped my rod and watched it sail off with my loop classic attached.
Now I had a split second to decide what to do then basically dived in after it.
I got a hold of my rod then bobbed down the pool face first doing the doggy paddle past my young lad and the 2 trout fishermen.
Not my finest moment. Haha.
I was completely soaked through.
I had to open all the pockets on my jacket to let the water out. My waders had filled up so did all my fly boxes in my pockets.
Stories of you turning upside down are load of rubbish. At no point was I worried about my safety only about my rod and reel.
Luckily it was just before lunch and it was sunny with a breeze so I managed to turn my waders inside out and dry them off over lunch. I had just enough spare clothes also so was sorted.
My son thought this was all hilarious
 

chriswjx

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Everyone on here probably without exception will have taken a dook at some point over the years.
What's the worst dook you have taken?
Mines was yesterday.
I was wading around this tree with quite a fast flow around it, I was holding onto a branch to keep me in the higher shallower part of the bank when it snapped then my foot slipped of the higher part and into the fast flowing deeper part.
At this point I was in and battered my knee that I've just had an operation on. I dropped my rod and watched it sail off with my loop classic attached.
Now I had a split second to decide what to do then basically dived in after it.
I got a hold of my rod then bobbed down the pool face first doing the doggy paddle past my young lad and the 2 trout fishermen.
Not my finest moment. Haha.
I was completely soaked through.
I had to open all the pockets on my jacket to let the water out. My waders had filled up so did all my fly boxes in my pockets.
Stories of you turning upside down are load of rubbish. At no point was I worried about my safety only about my rod and reel.
Luckily it was just before lunch and it was sunny with a breeze so I managed to turn my waders inside out and dry them off over lunch. I had just enough spare clothes also so was sorted.
My son thought this was all hilarious

Not me, but I was scrolling on facebook earlier in the month and saw a fellow selling the case for a Loop Classic 9/11... He was fishing the tweed when the exact same happened to him... Unfortunately he did not manage to get a hold of his rod... Poor bugger...
 

MCXFisher

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The whole idea of getting onto your back as soon as possible after you fall in is to limit the amount of water that gets into your waders. On your back the water presses your jacket and waders against your back, so the water doesn't creep up behind you. The main point of entry is through the open zip at the front.

The last prolonged swim I did resulted in shipping less than 1/2 pint of water, which meant that I could fish out the day quite easily.
 

chriswjx

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Also, on the topic of dropping the rod. Has anyone tried running a zinger or something to say the reel seat and your wrist? wouldn't have thought it would impair casting or movement if done properly, but also would mean your rod's safe if it takes a swim?
 

mows

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Only done it twice.
And both on the Westie.
A burn that tends to be 2 feet deep.
Once as i walking round the big corner pool bellow the cemetery.
I just stumbled on a root and staggered sideways into 6 feet of water.
The other was a couple of pools bellow.
There is a ledge at the head of the pool, that you cant see but is only a foot deep.
But allows you to stand in the rush and fish the head of the pool.
I was standing there fishing and thought i move another 6 inches out, without testing it.
Confidently put my foot down, and it just kept going.
Theres a fair flow there, so i was washed down in to the deeper water, just to make sure i was soaking.

Its a long walk back to car when your that wet!!
 

Rrrr

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Dont want to tempt fate here but its been a while.
Couple of close calls last doing daft things but managed to escape um dunked.
First one was wading over the river in high water on a gravel bed to fish a pool on the other side. Didnt have my wading stick and the gravel was shifting under my feet on the way back trying to get upstream. Was knackerd by the time i got back over.
Second time was when a mate showed me his secret spot. He failed to mention you just get in and cast at the far bank willows from the same spot. I thought i was meant to wade down to some stepping stones. Big trippy boulders and the water was chest high before i realised what he had meant

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

Wee-Eck

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My worst was fishing Upper Farleyer on the Tay. I It was a wet day and had been raining all night but the river was running clear. For those who don't know the beat it is just below Loch Tay where the Lyon runs in so the Loch water is always clear and at that time the Lyon had not started to colour up but was rising. I fished the junction pool and at the bottom waded over onto the island as there is a good hour to two hours fishing from the far side of the island. After about an hour I could see that the river was beginning to rise faster so decided to wade back onto the north bank. As soon as I started back I realised I was in trouble. Halfway over it was all I could do to hold my position with the wading stick jammed into the bottom and my stomach. I had a feeling I was not going to make it fully across the last 12 or 14' without getting wet so threw my rod and reel over onto the bank as high as I could so I could used both hands on the wading stick then started to inch my way over. Unfortunately the current was by this time just too powerful and I could feel the gravel being washed out from under my feet. Then the current took me. I was probably only in 3' of water but it washed the feet out from under me and I went right under. I had my gye net over my back and as I went right under it caught on the bottom and for a few seconds I was trapped underwater. Somehow I managed, probably assisted by the flow of water to snap the net where it joined the handle and I bobbed back to the surface. The flow then carried me downstream past the whole island and out into the main river where it started to calm down and I was able to think again. I was still on my back, feet facing downstream and I saw my cap floating about 10' away from me and like FS I made what was probably a poor decision but turned over and swam out to it. Once I had it back I turned back on my back and slowly edged my way downstream towards the bank eventually getting out about 1/2 mile from where I went in.
The worst bit apart from a broken net was after driving back to The Fortingall Hotel where I was staying. The receptionist could see what had happened and very kindly offered to dry my wet clothing while I had a shower and got changed (I always carry a spare pair of trousers and jumper in the car for such emergencies). Anyway I showered got changed again and went back down to the river as it was still before lunchtime. I got back in the evening and bless her all my stuff from the morning swim was dried and neatly folded on my bed. Unfortunately she had put everything into the tumble drier. My brand new Barbour jumper had shrunk to a size that would not have fitted a six year old.
I have never worn a net over my back from that day.
 

The flying Scotsman

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My worst was fishing Upper Farleyer on the Tay. I It was a wet day and had been raining all night but the river was running clear. For those who don't know the beat it is just below Loch Tay where the Lyon runs in so the Loch water is always clear and at that time the Lyon had not started to colour up but was rising. I fished the junction pool and at the bottom waded over onto the island as there is a good hour to two hours fishing from the far side of the island. After about an hour I could see that the river was beginning to rise faster so decided to wade back onto the north bank. As soon as I started back I realised I was in trouble. Halfway over it was all I could do to hold my position with the wading stick jammed into the bottom and my stomach. I had a feeling I was not going to make it fully across the last 12 or 14' without getting wet so threw my rod and reel over onto the bank as high as I could so I could used both hands on the wading stick then started to inch my way over. Unfortunately the current was by this time just too powerful and I could feel the gravel being washed out from under my feet. Then the current took me. I was probably only in 3' of water but it washed the feet out from under me and I went right under. I had my gye net over my back and as I went right under it caught on the bottom and for a few seconds I was trapped underwater. Somehow I managed, probably assisted by the flow of water to snap the net where it joined the handle and I bobbed back to the surface. The flow then carried me downstream past the whole island and out into the main river where it started to calm down and I was able to think again. I was still on my back, feet facing downstream and I saw my cap floating about 10' away from me and like FS I made what was probably a poor decision but turned over and swam out to it. Once I had it back I turned back on my back and slowly edged my way downstream towards the bank eventually getting out about 1/2 mile from where I went in.
The worst bit apart from a broken net was after driving back to The Fortingall Hotel where I was staying. The receptionist could see what had happened and very kindly offered to dry my wet clothing while I had a shower and got changed (I always carry a spare pair of trousers and jumper in the car for such emergencies). Anyway I showered got changed again and went back down to the river as it was still before lunchtime. I got back in the evening and bless her all my stuff from the morning swim was dried and neatly folded on my bed. Unfortunately she had put everything into the tumble drier. My brand new Barbour jumper had shrunk to a size that would not have fitted a six year old.
I have never worn a net over my back from that day.
I too nearly took a dook at the exact same bit. It's because you can wade downstream to the island but trying to wade back up stream isn't easy in decent water.
Had a bit of an escapade with my young lad doing that a couple season back. We were hanging on to the overhead branches for life.
 

Jockiescott

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I usually go for an unexpected dip at least once every season. Its just part of my fishing and because I'm lazy. If I took the time to put on my breathables with boots and felt soles I might cut out the dipping altogether but for most of my fishing, I just need waders to cross the river and could then fish in trainers off the bank if I really wanted to. So, I just pull on my PVC boot foot waders and off I go.

In all the occasions if went in, there's only once that scared me.

I was fishing down a fast, deep, stream with big boulders on the bottom. You can't see the bottom so you're feeling with your feet for the next step.

I was standing on my right leg, feeling for my next step with the left foot. I felt another boulder under the left foot and as I transferred my weight onto my left leg, the boulder rolled out towards the middle of the river and I went in on my back.

I couldn't feel the bottom with my hands and was being carried downstream. I eventually forced my feet to the bottom and got into a standing position. The water was touching my chin and the water was gushing into the waders.

I then made for the bank and was able to pull myself up the grass.

I took the waders off and couldn't believe the amount of water in them. My legs took weak and I sat down on the bank shaking like a leaf. I don't know if it was the cold or the shock.

I used to fish that part of the river very regularly but I could count on one hand the number of times I've fished it since and it happened about 20 years ago.
 
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The flying Scotsman

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I usually go for an unexpected dip at least once every season. Its just part of my fishing and because I'm lazy. If I took the time to put on my breathables with boots and felt soles I might cut out the dipping altogether but for most of my fishing, I just need waders to cross the river and could then fish in trainers off the bank if I really wanted to. So, I just pull on my PVC boot foot waders and off I go.

In all the occasions if went in, there's only once that scared me.

I was fishing down a fast, deep, stream with big boulders on the bottom. You can't see the bott so you're feeling with your feet for the next step.

I was standing on my right leg, feeling for my next step with the left foot. I frlt another boulder under the left foot and as I transferred my weight onto my left leg, the boulder rolled out into towards the middle of the river and I went in on my back.

I couldn't feel the bottom with my hands and was being carried downstream. I eventually forced my feet to the bottom and got into a sta position. The water was touching my chin and the water was gushing into the waders.

I then made for the bank and was able to pull myself up the grass.

I took the waders off and couldn't believe the amount of water in them. My legs took weak and I sat down on the bank shaking like a leaf. I don't know if it was the cold or the shock.

I used to fish that part of the river very regularly but I could count on one hand the number of times I've fished it since and it happened about 20 years ago.
I wasn't scared at all. I just felt a bit of pap.
And wet haha
 

iainmortimer

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No where near as exciting as jumping in after a rod like the OP but my stupidest was a fair few years ago when fishing some of the burns and hill lochs above Lochgoilhead. Having hiked for miles, I was fishing my way back to the car along a very windy burn. Rather than follow its snaking course the whole way, I would rock hop from one bank to the other as it twisted about to maintain a reasonably straight line of walking between pools. That was generally quite easy as a lot of the rocks had that nice grippy lichen on top and were fairly flat and the burn was in low summer conditions.

At one point, as the burn looped right, there was a large flat rock that was probably about 5' across making both a perfect casting platform to cover the head of the pool and a great crossing point. I therefore stepped out without even thinking about it although it was a couple of feet down from the bank height. This however turned out to be far less solid than the other rocks and by the time I realised my error I was way past the point of no return. You see the rock was no rock at all but a build up of debris, weed and scum that created exactly the same licheny look as the top of all the rocks I'd already used as stepping stones. This layer was therefore very unsolid and being only about half an inch thick, without stopping I continued to descend and ultimately faceplant into about 5' of chilly, scummy water with a yelp of surprise that I shall not repeat here!

Needless to say, by the time I scrambled out again I looked somewhat like a bog monster which is how I remained when arriving back at the hotel reception, bits of weed and debris dried on my face, into my hair and over my clothes. Worse still my wife had wondered off with the children and so much to the receptionists amusement I had to return a second time for the room key which required explaining to the receptionist and by now semi-informed colleagues how a bog monster had come into being.

My wife on returning was less than impressed that I had brought the family into disrepute as everyone was now talking about it, and even less so about the smelly fishing clothes I had by now carefully draped over the towel rail and anything else with some heat to dry. To be fair they did create an interesting ambience to our room.

The moral of the story is...Don't be a xxxxx ( I shan't repeat what my wife called me either :oops: )



Far less interesting was last year when I decided to fish a very rocky pool on the Usk despite having forgotten my wading stick. I did one of those lift my foot over rock, mmm it’s higher than I though and so I will need to lift my foot higher, oh crap the current is pushing me off balance, oh double crap the force against my landing net is stopping me pushing back upright moments before realising what was inevitable. Why in that situation do you still try and stop yourself faceplanting by putting your hands out like somehow the water will support you!
Needless to say, I got drenched but being an isolated place I stripped down to the birthday suit in the hot afternoon sun to dry off. Not as isolated as I thought though as not long after I got a text or two from club members asking me (tongue in cheek) if I had seen anything as a streaker had been reported by the river that afternoon...

E3329D8F-31A5-4A99-9E62-C23518401030.jpeg
 
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MCXFisher

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I usually go for an unexpected dip at least once every season. Its just part of my fishing and because I'm lazy. If I took the time to put on my breathables with boots and felt soles I might cut out the dipping altogether but for most of my fishing, I just need waders to cross the river and could then fish in trainers off the bank if I really wanted to. So, I just pull on my PVC boot foot waders and off I go.

In all the occasions if went in, there's only once that scared me.

I was fishing down a fast, deep, stream with big boulders on the bottom. You can't see the bottom so you're feeling with your feet for the next step.

I was standing on my right leg, feeling for my next step with the left foot. I felt another boulder under the left foot and as I transferred my weight onto my left leg, the boulder rolled out towards the middle of the river and I went in on my back.

I couldn't feel the bottom with my hands and was being carried downstream. I eventually forced my feet to the bottom and got into a standing position. The water was touching my chin and the water was gushing into the waders.

I then made for the bank and was able to pull myself up the grass.

I took the waders off and couldn't believe the amount of water in them. My legs took weak and I sat down on the bank shaking like a leaf. I don't know if it was the cold or the shock.

I used to fish that part of the river very regularly but I could count on one hand the number of times I've fished it since and it happened about 20 years ago.

Jockie,
you had a fortunate escape on two counts other than falling.

Rule 1 - never try to stand up unaided before you reach the bank where you can get a good hold on a bush or a strong tuft of grass. Trying to stand up in fast moving water is a recipe for a forward somersault, which can be very bad news. Trying to stand up in deep water is a recipe for drowning: you are only buoyant in the prone position.
Rule 2 - don't try to touch the bottom with your hand or grab something in the middle of the river. All that does is fill your jacket with water to no useful purpose.

And for Wee Eck
Rule 3 - anything attached to you must have a frangible part that will fail under the stress you described with your net. When that happened to me, the fail-safe ring in the sling of my Snowbee net failed exactly as designed and set me free.
 

Jockiescott

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Jockie,
you had a fortunate escape on two counts other than falling.

Rule 1 - never try to stand up unaided before you reach the bank where you can get a good hold on a bush or a strong tuft of grass. Trying to stand up in fast moving water is a recipe for a forward somersault, which can be very bad news. Trying to stand up in deep water is a recipe for drowning: you are only buoyant in the prone position.
Rule 2 - don't try to touch the bottom with your hand or grab something in the middle of the river. All that does is fill your jacket with water to no useful purpose.

And for Wee Eck
Rule 3 - anything attached to you must have a frangible part that will fail under the stress you described with your net. When that happened to me, the fail-safe ring in the sling of my Snowbee net failed exactly as designed and set me free.

I was only around 18 at the time. Young and no sense! 😊

One of the reasons now that I like spey casting so much. I'm not much further than a yard from the bank for the majority of the time in places I know extremely well.
 

ibm59

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Potentially the worst dook I narrowly avoided taking was at the top of the left bank on Portnacraig / Pitlochry.
Fell full length bankwards as the gravel , rocks , and stones gave way under my ankle deep wading boots
Someone on here did take a swim in the same spot , and considered himself lucky to get out alive.

I still get the sweats thinking about that one.
 

firefly

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Part of the game I guess. Always had the feeling that if I didn't fall in a river, I never fully came to terms with it. And looking back I think I fell in most rivers that I fished, but I never panicked, not even in a life-threatening situation. If you had the pleasure of falling in the eddy of the Stabburselva Seapool like me, you'll know that it's very cold and deep. But as Michael says, if you know what to do and how to react to unexpected circumstances, things turn out well in the end. Keep your head cool and your feet in front of you while the current pushes you near a bank, the worst you'll have to do is the full Monty afterwards.

Russia in spring...
P6050060.JPG
 
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The flying Scotsman

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Part of the game I guess. Always had the feeling that if I didn't fall in a river, I never fully came to terms with it. And looking back I think I fell in most rivers that I fished, but I never panicked, not even in a life-threatening situation. If you had the pleasure of falling in the eddy of the Stabburselva Seapool like me, you'll know that it's very cold and deep. But as Michael says, if you know what to do and how to react to unexpected circumstances, things turn out well in the end. Keep your head cool and your feet in front of you while the current pushes you near a bank, the worst you'll have to do is the full Monty afterwards.

Russia in spring...
View attachment 59993
I would add DONT let go of your rod
 

firefly

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I would add DONT let go of your rod
It can be helpful, but if I'm near a bank I'll always try to get rid of it. Not only for the sake of the rod, I like to have my hands free in an emergency situation. It all depends on the circumstances and the water flow, I guess, and on the time you get to react, of course.
 

NEbody

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I still expect to fall in from time to time, even though I should have had enough experience to have learned how to avoid it by now.

My most dramatic one was on a pool called Precipice, which we fished from a narrow ledge on the steep, deep side, underneath the feature for which it’s named. I missed my footing and went in head first into about 10 feet of water. Fortunately I was wearing thigh waders rather than chesties so I more or less did a tumble turn (albeit with few points for style), grabbed the bank and worked my way along the edge until I could scramble out. Managed to put my rod down on the ledge as I went and was able to retrieve it but lost my hat and spectacles. As well as a change of clothes, it taught me to keep spare spectacles In the car.
 

Handel

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A dook with a difference. I was seatrout fishing at night. It was pitch black. I thought I knew where I was on the bank and took a step forwards, nothing and then the river. Broke my rod, lost my specs and I was soaked. But I wasn't really in the river, very odd. My fishing partner agreed we should call it a night and we returned to his car to drive back to our lodgings. It was then he noticed a nasty smell. I hadn't really fallen in the river, I had fallen in one of those areas where cattle come to drink. And I was covered in what they always seem to do there. Put everything in the washing machine when we got back to the lodgings and went and had a shower, hair was full of it even 😖. And the following morning found my EA fishing licence as a small ball of washed paper in a pocket 😡 So that cost me another one. Only good result was going back and finding my specs undamaged. Yep always have a spare pair.
 

Hardyreels

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Spring 1977 April morning a place called English Center in north central Pennsylvania. This was back in my Hip Wader days / rubber soles slick as you know what on the soles. Slipped in upstream of a regular chute where the whole of a small river bottle necked between bedrock slabs and plunged down like places where they race kayaks. Boots filled with water and formed 2 heavy drift socks that led me feet first and threashing to keep the head above the turbulent flow. I played out into the pool below where a good half dozen onlookers had a fine bit of entertainment at my expense.

I bought my first chest waders that year and learned to rough the soles and glue outdoor rug to them using what was known as Barge Cement back then. I was gifted to be tall with good balance and good reflexes and as I aged I became a careful wader even if I didn't look it to others. I risk jinxing one hell of a streak but I have not fallen into a creek or river ever since I began with chest waders. By my count it amounts to 44 years if I make it through this season unscathed once more 😎

My old fishen buddy back there in PA used to take a good header every couple years and I worked with another guide here who would come bobbing down river at least twice per season or more. I never got how he fell in so often but he did.

Good on you for not losing your outfit Gordon!
 
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