Switch or short DH

Ratman

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Had a very busy year so I've decided to treat myself to a new rod. I want something to use on small and medium tree lined spate rivers capable of casting a range of lines and tip densities usually where space is limited. I cant decide weather to go for a switch or short double hander. I'd like to hear peoples opinions/recommendations. Thanks.
 

The flying Scotsman

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Had a very busy year so I've decided to treat myself to a new rod. I want something to use on small and medium tree lined spate rivers capable of casting a range of lines and tip densities usually where space is limited. I cant decide weather to go for a switch or short double hander. I'd like to hear peoples opinions/recommendations. Thanks.
I really enjoy using my switch rod on small spate rivers. A true switch gives you the opportunity to overhead cast if you can't or don't want to get into the water.
I personally think the smaller the rod the more fun it is to play big fish.
I'm in love with my 11ft loop cross s1 with a barrio switch line. Does everything and is a pleasure to use. My go to set up for summer fishing
 

Potbellied Pig

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I've followed all the numerous switch rod threads over the last number of years, so many opinions which is good. Personally I have a bit of a switch rod 'thing' going on having said that 75% of my salmon fishing is on small to medium spate rivers.
I have 5 so called switch rods
Sage One 11'6 8wt
Sage X 11' 7wt
Guidline Lpxe 11' 8/9
Loop Cross S1 10'7" 7wt
Salmologic Serenity 10'10" 18g
The bottom 3 in my opinion are true switch rods the other 2 are small double handers
I love them all the Salmologic being my go to this season but to be honest the Lpxe with a Guideline bullet 9wt (Trout rated)throws a fantastic line
But the Sages are awesome when needed
 

bassfly

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My first Switch rod was purchased in Canada and was 11ft 6# Wind Warrior made by Amundson and as it is rated for salmon lines I used a Rio Switch line and also a 8# trout rated double taper. This is a great rod for small spate rivers and has landed salmon up to 14lb.
On my next visit I purchased an 11ft 8# by Temple Fork Outfitters and this goes well with a Rio SSVT 8#. This worked well using the body with T tips up to T20.
Both rods cast single hand overhead or as a double hander.
The third Switch rod is a Vision 10ft 10in. 10# and was sold as a boat rod for sporting sea fish which I purchased to using in Canada for large Chinook's and matches up to 600/650 grain Skagit lines and T14/17/20 tips.
I also have a hand built double hander 12ft 5# trout rated rod which I use on small spate rivers when grilse are running and us it with a DT floating line. Beautiful rod for delicate presentation.
 
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Neil W

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I guess it depends on what you define as a switch rod. If it’s the ability to use as a single handed or double handed rod then a lot of so called ‘switch rods’ are not really switch rods but light double handed rods.
i have a few rods which are sold as switch rods. The best of these and the one I have used the most is the sage TCX 8119. i never bought this intending to cast single handed but as a light double handed rod which it does extremely well. Would I cast it single handed? Nope as too heavy for my weedy arms.
so my advice for what it’s worth is to decide if you need or want to use a rod as a single handed and a double handed rod or just using it as a double handed rod. If you go for the former then maybe go for the more European rods like guideline, loop, shake oracle etc who maybe rate their rods on the single handed scale and are 11’ or less in length. If it’s the later then there are plenty to choose from between 11’ and 12’6” which will fit the bill and will be rated on the ’double handed’ scale.
the sage TCX for instance is rated as a 8 wt by sage. I would use a 460 to 480 Scandi on this rod or a 510 short Skagit to a 540.
the shakie switch I have is rated a 8/9 and I can cast this single handed at a push and use a 390 Scandi on it so much lighter. Of the 2 the sage gets more use as it’s a very versitile light double handed rod and I like using double handed rods. It also has much more power to land salmon and is just a brilliant rod for small to medium rivers.
 

1kofly

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I would recommend a rod that capability looks endless. Winston BIIMX 11'6 in class 6. Throws the range from 400 grains to 475 grains. For me best options are 420 for scandi and 450 for skagit. It is amazing rod, light for its parameters, user friendly and with plenty of power in the butt. I used even overhead with 450 gr skagit to throw 20 cm streamers and there was no question marks.
 

charlieH

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10’ 8wt single hander . Start Spey casting on a tree lined river and your going to lose a lot of flies. Single handers are better for tucking flies under branches
That rather depends which bank the trees are on! One of the main reasons to Spey cast rather than overhead is a lack of space behind you.
 

mc andy

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That rather depends which bank the trees are on! One of the main reasons to Spey cast rather than overhead is a lack of space behind you.
Agree with this, one thing I'd add is? I bought a few of the salmologic heads a few years back to scratch an itch! 😊 they were very good, but incredibly short and not really necessary for my typical fishing, but would say they fit the bill perfectly, and would be a workable option.

Good luck, cheers Andy
 

grayghost

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You are most likely going to get many opinions, so here is mine. I live in the Midwestern US. We have several smaller rivers that we fish for steelhead on. I have used quite a few different brands of switch rods and most worked just fine as long as the correct lines are used. Because we are usually fishing in relatively cold temps and are using sink tips, the skagit lines seem to work best for our situation. Last season I had a chance to fish with a rod that my friend had purchased. It was a Bruce and Walker Powerlite 11' 3" 7/8/9. This rod is a short spey rod not a switch rod. He had it setup with a 425 grain OPST skagit commando head. I should add that if another brand of skagit head is used the rod would take a heavier weight. The OPST heads because of shortness and taper bring out the action with almost 100 grain less total weight. To me it is one of the nicest fishing and casting setups that I have used for our smaller rivers. I was so impressed that I ordered one just like it and it should be here in a couple of weeks. I am looking forward to having a chance to fish with it and think that you should take a look this option. Good luck in your search.
 
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colliedog01

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I like the switch for grilse but if the chance is there that a big salmon might smash your fly I’d personally prefer the power that a small double handed rod would have
 

MCXFisher

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Ended up buying a vision tool 11'6" #8 looking forward to trying it out
You won't be disappointed, it's a brilliant little rod that puts a huge smile on my face very time I use it. Moreover it covers a crazy amount of water. The #8 is a good choice because it gives you the extra power needed to fight a good salmon in a confined space, while the difference in presentation from a #7 cannot be discerned.
 

DC

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vision tool 11'6" #8: So is it any better than the shakey 11ft switch 8/9 # .... still a great option in my book.
 

1kofly

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Regarding Vision Tool, i 11’6” 5# is the one of the sweetest switch i had in my hand. Of course it is a trout/grilse size. I am still thinking about it :)
 

1kofly

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I guess it depends on what you define as a switch rod. If it’s the ability to use as a single handed or double handed rod then a lot of so called ‘switch rods’ are not really switch rods but light double handed rods.
i have a few rods which are sold as switch rods. The best of these and the one I have used the most is the sage TCX 8119. i never bought this intending to cast single handed but as a light double handed rod which it does extremely well. Would I cast it single handed? Nope as too heavy for my weedy arms.
so my advice for what it’s worth is to decide if you need or want to use a rod as a single handed and a double handed rod or just using it as a double handed rod. If you go for the former then maybe go for the more European rods like guideline, loop, shake oracle etc who maybe rate their rods on the single handed scale and are 11’ or less in length. If it’s the later then there are plenty to choose from between 11’ and 12’6” which will fit the bill and will be rated on the ’double handed’ scale.
the sage TCX for instance is rated as a 8 wt by sage. I would use a 460 to 480 Scandi on this rod or a 510 short Skagit to a 540.
the shakie switch I have is rated a 8/9 and I can cast this single handed at a push and use a 390 Scandi on it so much lighter. Of the 2 the sage gets more use as it’s a very versitile light double handed rod and I like using double handed rods. It also has much more power to land salmon and is just a brilliant rod for small to medium rivers.
TCX is fantastic. Had 11’9 7# and it is great and efortless casting rod. For scandi and skagit either. But with bigger flies and heavier tips it was struggling a little. That is why I switched to Winston B2MX.
 

Neil W

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TCX is fantastic. Had 11’9 7# and it is great and efortless casting rod. For scandi and skagit either. But with bigger flies and heavier tips it was struggling a little. That is why I switched to Winston B2MX.
The 8 wt TCX is much better on the big tips but both are excellent. I don’t know the Winston
 

1kofly

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The 8 wt TCX is much better on the big tips but both are excellent. I don’t know the Winston
Ok, good to know! maybe I will try it when one shows up. Winston - lighter than TCX, much more backbone when compared the same AFTMA class. A little less joyfull in casting but still very pleasent.
Paweł.
 

Neil W

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Ok, good to know! maybe I will try it when one shows up. Winston - lighter than TCX, much more backbone when compared the same AFTMA class. A little less joyfull in casting but still very pleasent.
Paweł.
A few of us used the 8wt TCX in Argentina for the Seatrout. The airflo skagit switch 510 is perfect on the rod and turned over T14 and big leeches very well. T 11 was more frequently used or the Rio 15ft tips
 

Old Dog

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You won't be disappointed, it's a brilliant little rod that puts a huge smile on my face very time I use it. Moreover it covers a crazy amount of water. The #8 is a good choice because it gives you the extra power needed to fight a good salmon in a confined space, while the difference in presentation from a #7 cannot be discerned.
I recently bought the Vision Tool 11` 6`` 7wt for grilse fishing on my small local spate rivers. Apart from a few casts on grass I haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but looking forward to fishing it later on this summer.
 
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