Sunrays

Johnfisher

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What's the deal with sunrays. Have read quite a bit about fishing them fast. What is it about a sunray that it is fished differently to a standard salmon fly? Also do they work in both fast and slow water? Cheers.
 

Tangled

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They can be fished any way you like, but for some reason (probably because they resemble sand eels), sunrays are often fished fast, stripping them across a pool.

If you do any foreign fishing with guides, they'll often get one of the pair swinging a fly in the normal way and the other stripping a sunray to see what works.

I believe it's considered bad practice on some of the snootier rivers.
 

Jockiescott

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What's the deal with sunrays. Have read quite a bit about fishing them fast. What is it about a sunray that it is fished differently to a standard salmon fly? Also do they work in both fast and slow water? Cheers.

My own personal experience in slow water is that I have had multiple fish rise, turn, boil and flash at the fly but I have never had a fish actually touch a sunray yet, never mind hook or land one. I had 8 up a sunray in one exceptionally frustrating evening!!!
 

Rrrr

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My own personal experience in slow water is that I have had multiple fish rise, turn, boil and flash at the fly but I have never had a fish actually touch a sunray yet, never mind hook or land one. I had 8 up a sunray in one exceptionally frustrating evening!!!
Ive been using shorter sunrays recently and have had better luck in getting hookups.




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Rrrr

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What's the deal with sunrays. Have read quite a bit about fishing them fast. What is it about a sunray that it is fished differently to a standard salmon fly? Also do they work in both fast and slow water? Cheers.
I just swing them with a figure of 8 in faster water water to keep in contact with the fly. The fish just seem to apear from nowhere and boil at the fly.

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Tangled

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It can be very exciting fishing. If you're using a floating line and pulling, the fly is fishing high in the water and you'll often see an enormous bow wave as the fish chases it. Then misses it :cool:
 

Oscar

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Great fun, can be very frustrating, but beats the hour upon hour of down and across!

One year on the Alness it saved my year (had 4 in very low water I think) then the next year, same river, they didn't touch it. Weird. Have had a few on the Thurso, and one very frustrating hour last year when I had the fish chase the fly probably 10 times, and just wouldn't take!

Oscar.
 

Tangled

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one very frustrating hour last year when I had the fish chase the fly probably 10 times, and just wouldn't take!

Oscar.
I've had that in a pool with at least four fish in. Follow after follow but no take no matter what I did. Then it started raining and I caught one almost straight away. Bloody fish.
 

Pete V

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I have learned that if a fish swirls at you sunray and doesn't take it, changing the fly to something with a little more weight like a conehead francis will often catch the fish.
This has worked a few times for me.
It seems that the action of the sunray can wake the fish up.
 

Rennie

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I've heard it said before quite a few times, when one is fishing a big flee fast in or on the surface Salar moves to the flee fast out of aggression but due to refraction will more than likely miss the flee, especially if its on a downstream curve!. Its often said to be better to fish stripped flee's like this at 4" or so deep where refraction won't be an issue then the 1st thing you know like as not is when everything locks up and yer arm gets pulled up the butt ring!.In short, put the flee where Salar gets a proper look at it and has every opportunity to home in and gob it !.Yes you'll miss the excitement of the visual follows and near misses, but in the long run more fish end up on the bank with more positive contact.
Rods working as a pair through a pool use the S.R.S pulled fast to find where fish are laying, then the slower conventionally fished flee to target the lay.This dosen't mean the rod fishing aggressively with the S.R.S misses out, its just as likely to put fish on the bank.Its the old trick of big flee1st through fished faster, then conventional flee fished slower following when the fish are "on the fin" as it were.
Some times fast stripping and constant casting can put fish down and some beats do frown on it's over use as it can shut pools down for the guys following conventionally, especially in low water and strong sunlight.
In all honesty?, as ever a little common sense is probably best, ask the other rods and maybe reserve its use to the afternoon/evening rotation, then the pools get rested overnight once more.
My own line of thinking is I never go in all guns blazing I prefer to feel my way in, I'd keep the method for later in the day., but thats just me.Trying not to cut off yer nose to spite yer face seems reasonable!.
Pedro.
 

Mick_G

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Tied my first sunray style fly yesterday, literally the easiest fly to tie then I went out and caught my PB Tyne brownie within 10 minutes of starting fishing!…..then nothing else happened for the next 4 hours but that just doesn’t sound as good so forget that bit 😂

mick
 

Oscar

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And what is a Sunray take likely to be like? Similar to a big trout hitting a reservoir lure?
I’ve had splashes on the surface, fish porpoisong to take it, standard underwater takes, and fish launching themselves out of the pool. Exciting!

Oscar.
 

Rrrr

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The take i had on sat night wasnt the usual. I had a slight bow in the line and as the fly sped up and rose in the water i got a take that was really gentle near the surface. Then all hell broke loose and it tore off about 30 yards down the pool.

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Rrrr

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Also a fish bow waving after the fly gets the heart going in a small pool as you feel like shouting "just take the fly" as you get closer to the near bank

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Rrrr

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So like a big reservoir trout at Muddler time?! Looks incredible.
This one was exatcly like a fish chasing a muddler or hitting a dry as you lift off. It spotted the fly at about 8 yards and came shooting across the surface after it in a small deep pool.


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phil.b

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My own personal experience in slow water is that I have had multiple fish rise, turn, boil and flash at the fly but I have never had a fish actually touch a sunray yet, never mind hook or land one. I had 8 up a sunray in one exceptionally frustrating evening!!!
Fish the sunray on a sunk line or something like a hover/int with extra fast tip you will get a lot of surface action fishing up in the water ,but you will get a lot more takes fishing deeper. Just my experience mind 🎣 :cool:
 

Handel

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Fish the sunray on a sunk line or something like a hover/int with extra fast tip you will get a lot of surface action fishing up in the water ,but you will get a lot more takes fishing deeper. Just my experience mind 🎣 :cool:
Only fish I have ever caught on a sunray in the UK was on the Tay. Gillie said to fish it on a medium sink line - 4.5 ips - so I did, even in quite low water. Worked a treat.
 

Occasional salmon fisher

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For me a Monkey is the equivalent of a sub-surface sunray. A Monkey on a floater/sink tip or sun-ray on a sinking line would look very similar to a salmon.
 
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