Strangest thing youve seen fishing?

fixedspool

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Was fishing a trout competition one day at Pitsford Reservoir using three buzzer nymphs on a 12 foot leader. Hooked a trout on the point fly and as it neared the boat with the rod held high a house martin too the black buzzer on my top dropper much to the consternation of my boat partner.
I bullied the fish as best I could but when the fish dived the Martin took several duckings. Managed to land the fish and released the house martin which was a bit soggy but reasonably OK . Kept it warm in my jacket for a while before we decided it was ready for release. It was not and as we launched it it promptly fell back into the lake. We netted it again and my companion insisted we took it in to the wardens office which we did. Needless to say having lost so much time the competition was a waste of time.
 

Andrew B

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Inspired by the also weird and wonderful thread.
What is the strangest thing youve seen fishing?
Can be fishing related or anything from a naked kayaker to a ufo to a ghost. Anything you thought was strange is fair game.
I will start off with a fishing one.
Sitting happily fishing away in my wee boat when it was moored on loch Tay I was looking into the water and seen a jack pike of around 4lb.
What I couldn't understand was how it was moving through the water side ways. It was moving forward but side on.
It took a good few puzzled seconds to notice a big black horseshoe shape over the middle of it. On further inspection the horseshoe was infact the tip of the nose of massive pike as long as my boat was wide.
I've seen some massive salmon spending most my time growing up around the Tay but the biggest fish bar maybe that dying salmon my son seen that I mistook for a tree have been pike in loch Tay. That one there and another even bigger off the bridge at Kenmore. It was a huge log with BIG yellow eyes.
Wowzers Loch Tay Pike. If you had to guess, how big would you say? Bearing in mind how big those Lochs are and the amount of food available it’s not impossible to imagine pike of record breaking proportions?
 

Andrew B

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There's something I've often wondered about, not as interesting or funny as above stories But I have wondered if any body else seen it. think it was three summers ago either last Saturday in june or first Saturday in july around 0.30am coming back from sea trout fishing. looking south west from south west Scotland. way way up in the sky I saw a very bright light slowly coming down like a Chinese lantern with spotlight on it up high then all of a sudden it shot of faster than a bullet across the sky at 90 degrees from its original coarse for a few seconds before disappearing in the sky.

I took it to be a shooting star coming straight towards us to begin with which would explain the slowness when I first saw it and then perhaps bouncing of the earths atmosphere. at the time I tried to read about them and as far as i could find out apparently shooting stars don't behave like that. well this one did. I certainly don't think it was a alien coming to earth to do a handbrake turn. Must have been a rare event I think. perhaps not.

Lol behave. No s**** I’ve seen the exact same thing after getting back from sea trout fishing on the Avon in Devon I was just about to get in my caravan when I noticed a lantern like globe thing which was clearly not one of those Chinese lanterns. The light it was emitting was like some Bethlehem S*** lol. I must of watched it for half n hour and it wasn’t even too far away. Anyway as I went in to get the Mrs to have a look the thing had gone and no I don’t believe in Aliens. If I was at sea I would of explained it as the phenomenon known as St Elmos fire? 🔥
Funny enough earlier on that night whilst walking to the next pool, I looked down and picked up what I thought was one of those luminous float tips that you snap to engage? Upon picking it up though it was all soft n freaky and it was infact a glow worm.
Had no idea we had Glow worms in the U.K. until that night and I kid you not, they’re even more luminous green than the float tips lol.
 

Devlin

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Fishing the Ribble late one summers evening with tiny dry fly. I lifted the fly off the water and did a few back/forward casts to get some line out. Suddenly the line went heavy on my final backcast and took on a life of its own, flying off in all directions. It took more than a few seconds to realise a bat had taken the fly in mid air.

It was a ferocious little bugger after I reeled it in to remove the hook!
 

The flying Scotsman

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Fishing the Ribble late one summers evening with tiny dry fly. I lifted the fly off the water and did a few back/forward casts to get some line out. Suddenly the line went heavy on my final backcast and took on a life of its own, flying off in all directions. It took more than a few seconds to realise a bat had taken the fly in mid air.

It was a ferocious little bugger after I reeled it in to remove the hook!
Been there a couple times haha
 

The flying Scotsman

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Wowzers Loch Tay Pike. If you had to guess, how big would you say? Bearing in mind how big those Lochs are and the amount of food available it’s not impossible to imagine pike of record breaking proportions?
The pike with the pike in his mouth i recon was was high 20's anyway maybe 30's. The one off the bridge was easy 6ft long. My pal spotted it just sitting in the current. I refused to believe it was a fish because of its size until I seen its huge yellow eyes. I will never forget it. 40's ?? at a guess I've no idea. We threw a builder at it and missed and it just changed its angle to the flow slightly at drifted off.
 

gwelsher

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Fishing from a boat at Ravensthorpe my mate netted a rainbow for me.
That's convenient he said "the hooks come out in the net" and passed it over to me.
I looked in the net and there was this monstrosity of a pink and lime blobby thing. That ain't "expletive" mine, "expletive" things should be banned it's not proper fly fishing.
I took my buzzer out of the fishes mouth and noticed a couple of feet of mono sticking out.
I pulled on the mono and saw the blob move in the net.
I traced the line from this blob back to the fishes vent.
Pulling the fly and line they were definitely attached together and I pulled it out by the fly end. So the fish had passed that #8 Blob through it's stomach and and out its vent.
Must have made its eyes water :eek:
 

Andrew B

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Fishing the Ribble late one summers evening with tiny dry fly. I lifted the fly off the water and did a few back/forward casts to get some line out. Suddenly the line went heavy on my final backcast and took on a life of its own, flying off in all directions. It took more than a few seconds to realise a bat had taken the fly in mid air.

It was a ferocious little bugger after I reeled it in to remove the hook!
Lol been there done that a few times. Such a strange feeling when your back cast starts to fly away lol.
 

The flying Scotsman

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I used to fish butterstone loch for trout its real close to loch of the lowes osprey reserve, and would ofter sit and watch from the boat the ospreys plunder the trout. Its amazing to watch. Especially that close. You could of hit them with a stone. Higes splash then the effort of lift of with the water and the fish.
Some huge pike were caught from butterstone also often on the fly.
 

SOS

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The pike with the pike in his mouth i recon was was high 20's anyway maybe 30's. The one off the bridge was easy 6ft long. My pal spotted it just sitting in the current. I refused to believe it was a fish because of its size until I seen its huge yellow eyes. I will never forget it. 40's ?? at a guess I've no idea. We threw a builder at it and missed and it just changed its angle to the flow slightly at drifted off.
I can imagine that neither the builder being thrown at the pike nor the pike having a builder thrown at it were very happy.
 

Andrew B

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Nothing super natural about this one albeit its something I couldn’t explain at the time?
On Holiday in Keswick in March in the middle of some crazy warm weather for the time of year.
The river Derwent and Greta both hold some quality wild brown trout that are super educated and in the clear water can be a challenge to catch esp in March.
Having opted for the Greta despite the sun and fly life I failed to catch but on my way back whilst on a disused railway bridge overlooking a clear deep pool I witnessed something that goes against brown trout logic?
There were two huge trout both getting on into double figures? These fish were positioned side by side and both were sipping down some sort of tiny flies.
To get behind them would of meant walking about a quarter of a mile and scrambling up the other side which is what I should of done. Instead I got down upstream of them and spooked em with a poor cast.

The sight of those fish stayed with me forever and a few years later I got talking to an old head on the river who told me they were almost certainly lake fish from Derwent or Bassenthwaite that had spawned and stayed around, and was likely a pair which would explain their tolerance of each other as brown trout of this size are usually territorial in nature.

Still wonder if they were Ferox taking flies in the river or just a different species of large glacial lake trout?
Whatever they were I was almost too embarrassed to mention the size of those trout for fear of being laughed at lol.
 

Wee Porters

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Wasn't fishing at the time but....

I drove into the fishing car park on a p!ssing wet day and parked up a few yards away from the only
other car there, got out and as I was putting my waders on noticed the windows all steamed up
and the engine on in the other car, thinking the worst I went for a closer look and aye you've probably
guessed, a randy couple were hard at it. 😮 I left them to it and headed to the river in the rain.

Sure one of the forum members seen a black panther on the Thornhill beat one day, maybe he'll be along to
tell us about it.
 

westie4566

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Fishing the Ribble late one summers evening with tiny dry fly. I lifted the fly off the water and did a few back/forward casts to get some line out. Suddenly the line went heavy on my final backcast and took on a life of its own, flying off in all directions. It took more than a few seconds to realise a bat had taken the fly in mid air.

It was a ferocious little bugger after I reeled it in to remove the hook!
Like other's, I've had more than my fair share of bat's on the back cast over the years (perhaps that should be the 'batcast', lol) especially over the summer nights whilst fishing for seatrout in the dark.

They are most certainly a grumpy wee parcel to unhook! That said, who could blame them 😂
 

Bothy Cat

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I once fished one of the chalk streams with decent numbers of Mayfly hatching. Although they were starting to get rather fussy a few fish were still rising. I became aware of a fish close in to my bank lying fairly shallow and maybe three metres upstream. I was able to land a delicate cast above the fish and awaited the response. As the fly passed over the fish, it turned on its side and closely scrutinised the fly with one eye like a scientist examining something in close detail. Maybe one eye gave it better powers of scrutiny at close range, it worked of course as it refused the fly and never looked at my offering again. A truly educated trout.
 
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lefthandup

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My mate and I went trout fishing down the lakes many summers ago.

We camped at Hawkshead on one of the camp sites there.
Anyway, the first days fishing we bought our permits for the still water..think it may have been called Watindlath or something...fishing away and environment agency guy turns up and checks our permits...then asks for our rod licences.... we'd forgot all about them...done and a £90 fine incoming.

Our second day got worse...arriving back at campsite we opened a couple of cans and had a smoke... eventually we decided to turn in....off to sleep.

After a while I vaguely heard the zip of our tent being opened...then a naked lady trying to get into my sleeping bag...my mate woke up asking what the f### was going on .. realised she was naked and we told her she was in the wrong tent blah blah...we couldn't get through to her as she must've been out of it.

Anyhow...next thing we hear is her bruizer of a bloke shouting outside the tent...she immediately came to her sense's but was too late...he burst in smacked me in the eye and pulled her out by the hair...still remember her backside disappearing out the tent door...she took a beating as well and the whole campsite was in uproar.

The police turned up and sorted it out without any fuss...they were gone by the morning....if I hadn't a black eye and seen her nickers outside our tent I'd almost certainly have thought I had been dreaming.

Quite a weekend.
 

Wee Porters

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I once fished one of the chalk streams with decent numbers of Mayfly hatching. Although they were starting to get rather fussy a few fish were still rising. I became aware of a fish close in to my bank lying fairly shallow and maybe three metres upstream. I was able to land a delicate cast above the fish and awaited the response. As the fly passed over the fish, it turned on its side and closely scrutinised the fly with one eye like a scientist examining something in close detail. Maybe one eye gave it better powers scrutiny at close range, it worked of course as it refused the fly and never looked at my offering again. A truly educated trout.

Brought me in mind of something which happened to me about 14 years ago.

River was running crystal clear and just above summer low, on a recce one day I spotted a small pod
of Grilse lying just off the point of a groyne near the head of a pool. Behind the groyne was a high bank
with a couple of big trees on it [one of which was my spotting tree].

I was fairly certain that I'd be able to get in a position on the groyne to trot a worm past these fish without
spooking them, this was the case and when in position I flicked the worms upstream on 4lb nylon and watched
as they drifted down to and through the shoal without any of them showing any interest. This was repeated and
on the next cast one of them intercepted the bait but with my polaroids on I could clearly see the hook outside
the mouth as the fish held the worms by the tail. I was kinda expecting it to sook the worms in but after about 10
seconds it blew them out, all of this without me feeling the slightest thing. A few more casts later and the same fish
done the same thing, held the worms by the tail then rejected them, after that none of them showed any interest in
the bait. If I hadn't been able to see what had happened I would've been none the wiser.
 

Andrew B

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My mate and I went trout fishing down the lakes many summers ago.

We camped at Hawkshead on one of the camp sites there.
Anyway, the first days fishing we bought our permits for the still water..think it may have been called Watindlath or something...fishing away and environment agency guy turns up and checks our permits...then asks for our rod licences.... we'd forgot all about them...done and a £90 fine incoming.

Our second day got worse...arriving back at campsite we opened a couple of cans and had a smoke... eventually we decided to turn in....off to sleep.

After a while I vaguely heard the zip of our tent being opened...then a naked lady trying to get into my sleeping bag...my mate woke up asking what the f### was going on .. realised she was naked and we told her she was in the wrong tent blah blah...we couldn't get through to her as she must've been out of it.

Anyhow...next thing we hear is her bruizer of a bloke shouting outside the tent...she immediately came to her sense's but was too late...he burst in smacked me in the eye and pulled her out by the hair...still remember her backside disappearing out the tent door...she took a beating as well and the whole campsite was in uproar.

The police turned up and sorted it out without any fuss...they were gone by the morning....if I hadn't a black eye and seen her nickers outside our tent I'd almost certainly have thought I had been dreaming.

Quite a weekend.
Lol I can well believe this story as my whole family had similar experience.
The place you mentioned is called Watendlath and is a beautiful place. When I was just a kid my parents and my Auntie and Uncle would camp at Borrowdale campsite a few hour walk over the mountain from Watendlath.
My mum got freaked in the toilets by meeting a woman in an IRA style balaclava who explained it was for the midges.
After making a campfire some other couples turned up and at the end of the night just blurted out if they were all up for a bit of wife swapping lol? 😂
My uncle is a larger than life character who once tossed a vicious German Shepard off a bridge for going after his wife lol. After taking aside the husbands and having a quiet word about their being children about they soon left and went about their own wife swapping. Come the morning the look on their faces was a picture as they all looked so glum lol.

That site at Borrowdale is beautiful but it doesn’t half attract some strange folk.
 

Andrew B

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Brought me in mind of something which happened to me about 14 years ago.

River was running crystal clear and just above summer low, on a recce one day I spotted a small pod
of Grilse lying just off the point of a groyne near the head of a pool. Behind the groyne was a high bank
with a couple of big trees on it [one of which was my spotting tree].

I was fairly certain that I'd be able to get in a position on the groyne to trot a worm past these fish without
spooking them, this was the case and when in position I flicked the worms upstream on 4lb nylon and watched
as they drifted down to and through the shoal without any of them showing any interest. This was repeated and
on the next cast one of them intercepted the bait but with my polaroids on I could clearly see the hook outside
the mouth as the fish held the worms by the tail. I was kinda expecting it to sook the worms in but after about 10
seconds it blew them out, all of this without me feeling the slightest thing. A few more casts later and the same fish
done the same thing, held the worms by the tail then rejected them, after that none of them showed any interest in
the bait. If I hadn't been able to see what had happened I would've been none the wiser.

I don’t care what anyone says, there’s a real skill to worming for salmon in low water. I just can’t do it but I’ve seen guys on the Ogwen fish in those frothy little pots or pockets in the knowledge that there would be a fish there?

Last time I used bait was on the Dwyfor on a pool that the salmon like. I bought some shrimps and the pins and hooks and freelined my shrimp down the pool in peaty coloured water. Reeled in and the shrimp was decimated, same thing happened about five times and I thought it had to be trout as I felt nothing? Next go I left it a bit longer, felt nothing and when I reeled in I was badly snagged on the bottom. After pulling this way and that, the bottom suddenly moved and all hell broke loose with a large salmon for that river attached to my line. The fish was about 15lbs and whilst it wasn’t fresh in, it was more than acceptable to take for the table.
Thing is at no point did I feel like I angled for that fish and from what I’m told about shrimp fishing, they can blow the bait out in the blink of an eye. So it just felt like a foul hooked fish and was pure luck so I put the thing back.

I didn’t even carry on fishing after that with the shrimp even though I knew there were more to be had.
Would of been interesting to see what was going on down there but I’ve never fished the shrimp since just in case I actually got good at it lol.
 

Rrrr

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Just telling my dad some of these and hes laughing his head off.

He said he once played a decent salmon and got it close to the bank and it was about 11/12 lb.
He beached it and went to tail it.... it was only a big seatrout and as he grabbed the tail it just gave a slight kick, spitting the flee and sliding from his grip straight back into the river

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

mows

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I don’t care what anyone says, there’s a real skill to worming for salmon in low water. I just can’t do it but I’ve seen guys on the Ogwen fish in those frothy little pots or pockets in the knowledge that there would be a fish there?

Last time I used bait was on the Dwyfor on a pool that the salmon like. I bought some shrimps and the pins and hooks and freelined my shrimp down the pool in peaty coloured water. Reeled in and the shrimp was decimated, same thing happened about five times and I thought it had to be trout as I felt nothing? Next go I left it a bit longer, felt nothing and when I reeled in I was badly snagged on the bottom. After pulling this way and that, the bottom suddenly moved and all hell broke loose with a large salmon for that river attached to my line. The fish was about 15lbs and whilst it wasn’t fresh in, it was more than acceptable to take for the table.
Thing is at no point did I feel like I angled for that fish and from what I’m told about shrimp fishing, they can blow the bait out in the blink of an eye. So it just felt like a foul hooked fish and was pure luck so I put the thing back.

I didn’t even carry on fishing after that with the shrimp even though I knew there were more to be had.
Would of been interesting to see what was going on down there but I’ve never fished the shrimp since just in case I actually got good at it lol.
Similar with me this year.
Got to one of my pools and entered at the top.
Got my line out.
Flicked the first cast out to get ready to fish down the pool and an 18lb sealiced hen took my fly before it was even swinging round.
I played it for 15 minutes, landed it, took a picture and went home.
I wonder how many I would have caught it I had stayed.
 

The flying Scotsman

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I once fished one of the chalk streams with decent numbers of Mayfly hatching. Although they were starting to get rather fussy a few fish were still rising. I became aware of a fish close in to my bank lying fairly shallow and maybe three metres upstream. I was able to land a delicate cast above the fish and awaited the response. As the fly passed over the fish, it turned on its side and closely scrutinised the fly with one eye like a scientist examining something in close detail. Maybe one eye gave it better powers scrutiny at close range, it worked of course as it refused the fly and never looked at my offering again. A truly educated trout.
I was sitting with a girl in my car parked up at the side of the river one evening and seen a big brownie supping flies of the surface. It must if been a good hatch as it was swirling around and around in the same spot. I didn't have my fishing gear with me as I had other things on my mind haha. So I nipped up to where I knew my mate was fishing and gave him a lift down to the pool id seen the big brownie in.
He asked what do up think I should put on I said something big. So we both agreed on this big muddler moth. He had only flicked his flies into the water and started stripping line to cast when 6ft in front of us this big fish turned and took his fly.
What happened next was over in a flash. His reel started screaming as it took off down river straight into the fast flowing rapids and into the next pool and gone.
Yes theses big trout are indeed very educated and not easy to hook let alone land.
 

Andrew B

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Similar with me this year.
Got to one of my pools and entered at the top.
Got my line out.
Flicked the first cast out to get ready to fish down the pool and an 18lb sealiced hen took my fly before it was even swinging round.
I played it for 15 minutes, landed it, took a picture and went home.
I wonder how many I would have caught it I had stayed.
That’s very definition of sporting imo. I’ve done the same on the Dart where they had a policy of only being allowed to take ones second fish like that would ever happen to me lol?
Anyway lo and behold I took a nice grilse from a funny little place, put it back begrudgingly and cast back into the same spot and took another and no I did not put that one back lol.
One of the snooty members that’s always in the T&S reports down there got told by the owner of the beat and he had the cheek to say I hope it he put he back. Anyway as it happens I bumped into him the day after on the river as he was so sure I’d broken the rules with just one fish, until I pulled out my phone and showed him both fish lol.
Naturally he was curious to where I caught them and when I pointed to the lie he couldn’t believe it as he’d only fished the river for fifty years and never thought about trying the place lol.
 

Andrew B

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This story is a bit freaky in itself as I only told the story last week about a famous aristocrat called Jan Morris who was an ex spy, Everest journalist, author and probably one of the first men to undergo bottom surgery to become a woman.

He owned the Dwyfor where I fished and was well loved by all. I mentioned how upon meeting his wife(yes he had a wife) about her telling me of a Yank who stayed in the hall, wentout sea trout fishing after dark and within half hour came running back, packed his bags and said the whole river and woods were haunted lol.
She told me it’s the living we need to fear and not the dead.
The freaky thing was, the day after I posted this story on here, the BBC news page reported Jan Morris death and gave a moving obituary of this eccentric aristocratic.
I know exactly where Jan Morris is to buried as his wife told me and I remember reading it somewhere? There’s a great sea trout pool on his estate that has a Long Island at the bottom that divides the river and it was his wishes to buried there and quite honestly I couldn’t think of a nicer place.
RIP Jan Morris
 

Safranfoer

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I saw a guy wearing a horned viking helmet with a treble in his cheek, walking fairly calmly and prosaically back to his car. Stag weekend. Or so he said. I didn't see any other viking fishers that day. Which one of you was it?

And once when walking to a pool my fishing companion's lurcher shot off and returned with a mewling, pretty much newborn fawn. Followed by its furiously angry mama, thundering at us before rearing up on two legs and bellowing. That was different.

Other than that, it was mostly fish that surprised me. My norm was catching weed or leaves.
 
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