Sinking lines

Don CurlyHorny

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The ME arrowhead twin Spey lines were a lovely cast, the floater, never tried the sinkers though.
 

Rrrr

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The ME arrowhead twin Spey lines were a lovely cast, the floater, never tried the sinkers though.
Cheers. Might give it a fling and see what its like before i tell the old man he can keep it.

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Icelander05

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Airflo 40+Sniper for me too. I do use the full set (single hand and switch) for all sorts of fishing. I am using a casette reel for this purpose and quickly change to the densities that I do need. These are very robust lines that don't let you down for years.
Icelander05
 

Icelander05

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Should have mentioned, #8 for a #8 single hander and for the switch rods one or even two above. (depends a little on the rod and the
casting ability)
Icelander05
 

neilt

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Cheers. Might give it a fling and see what its like before i tell the old man he can keep it.

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The intermediate is a great line, best inty Spey line I’ve used. The wet II is good too. The fast sinker isn’t much use.
 

keirstream

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How do the arrowhead lines cast ? Got one on a hardy spool from ebay last year but never had a cast of it yet. Gave it to my dad to try on his 13ft vision first but hes not tried eirher.

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Neil is correct. The fast sink version was like casting a bag of spanners but the Inty and medium sink are lovely lines,
The 1st time I fished East Haugh on the West Bank Home Stream I had a run down it using the medium sink and a No 6 cascade.
I had 5 springers in one run down last week of April. It just seemed to fish perfectly and prior to that I had a good few from the Portnacraig beat as well. As soon as I seen 1 up for sale here I grabbed it, so don't get rid of it, a lovely line.(y)
 

Jeff

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My view is the reverse of what you say in para 1. Sorry
You’re quite right. I got it the wrong way round.
Here’s a link to an article from 1979 where some detailed testing was done on the then range of sinking lines readily available in the USA. The Wet Cel II rates for level sections of the belly of various AFTMA weights are in Table 1 of the third page of the pdf.
Good luck to anyone reading the whole article!
 

Maggy

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You’re quite right. I got it the wrong way round.
Here’s a link to an article from 1979 where some detailed testing was done on the then range of sinking lines readily available in the USA. The Wet Cel II rates for level sections of the belly of various AFTMA weights are in Table 1 of the third page of the pdf.
Good luck to anyone reading the whole article!
OK well researched. The other point is the line-length. The heavier lines are obtainable in full salmon lengths, maybe 35 yds, so the belly of the line has much more weight than shorter lines. I suppose it’s all about relative density.
 

Rennie

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As far as sinking lines go, the Wet Cel 2 was the general purpose sinker. It sank from 2.5 to 3 ips, that would depend on the lines profile and weight. The DT 12 being the fastest at 3ips. Bear in mind also that was before density compensation, so thinner finer front tapers and running lines would sink slower than heavy fat bellies.
Now for a modern day equivalent, the Airflo Di3 will be pretty close as will the Guideline sink 1/2. Both will sink quicker at the tip due to density compensation.
Now Isisalar,I'd think carefully about using one of this type of lines for Salmon as they'll be 20lb core!, most Trout lines are!, so be aware.
I'd also say a wet 2 or equivalent might not be fast enough for your intended purpose!, hazarding a guess you'll need a quicker sinking line for the Avon.Also bearing in mind some of the brute's that get caught there a single hander might not be the best line of approach.I feel very much you'll be cutting off your nose to spite your face.
Personally I'd look to a short double hander (to help you cast overhead and to control any fish you'll hook to boot! ), a Skagit line, T tips and flee's with not too much weight- maybe a tungsten cone!- but still plenty of wing length from a short leader.Honestly a Wet 2 won't be any where near fast enough!..Now you'll need to factor in the weight of the Skagit and the tips you'll be using if you're going to overhead cast or you'll break your rod!.
A chinese Skagit can be got for not a lot of outlay and then some T stuff lengths will see you in a far better place for the catching of catching Salar over a single hander and wf wet 2 line!.
As far as the Evans sinkers go, well they're bob on, actually density compensated and a touch quicker than a wet 2 of equivalent size at 3.3 ips, they fish a lot lot better than a DT wet cel 2, much more predictable.Another thing to be realised is the Evans lines are designed to be fished in conjunction with the Evans 10ft poly tips, being parallel the sink rate of his own polys are very well predictable and work very very well together.Not only is the sink rate at the business end maintained, but the extra length makes the lines much much better to cast.I hear some of you question the fastest sinker being a bag of spanners to cast?, well a similar sink rate of Evans poly sorts the front on that line out nicely.
The Intermediate is a wonderful line, worth a pop on any ones spare spool.The floater does work, but needs extending with a 15ft Airflo poly and at least 6ft of tippet.
For lovers of full lines, they're a great choice and will work very well indeed.
Pedro.
 

LISBOA58

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I have all the M. Evans sinking lines. Never used them much, but I don´t remember ever being disapointed.

As a matter of fact, once in the Ponoy, late September and very cold weather, the fastest sinker saved the day twice; my Skagit line was useless.
Perhaps because the first line put the fly deeper, right at the bottom.
 

Handel

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Airflo 40+Sniper for me too. I do use the full set (single hand and switch) for all sorts of fishing. I am using a casette reel for this purpose and quickly change to the densities that I do need. These are very robust lines that don't let you down for years.
Icelander05
Are these trout lines or salmon lines? I couldn't really work it out from the Youtube clips but see Rennie's point in his post about line strength.
 

keirstream

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The Airflo 40+ lines that I use are trout lines and really nice to cast. I use them for all my summer work up North
unless there is a flood or strong winds. Along with the Rio Single Hander Spey Line covers all the floating bases.
Don't know about the Sniper though, although I would imagine it is also trout rated?
 

Isisalar

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As far as sinking lines go, the Wet Cel 2 was the general purpose sinker. It sank from 2.5 to 3 ips, that would depend on the lines profile and weight. The DT 12 being the fastest at 3ips. Bear in mind also that was before density compensation, so thinner finer front tapers and running lines would sink slower than heavy fat bellies.
Now for a modern day equivalent, the Airflo Di3 will be pretty close as will the Guideline sink 1/2. Both will sink quicker at the tip due to density compensation.
Now Isisalar,I'd think carefully about using one of this type of lines for Salmon as they'll be 20lb core!, most Trout lines are!, so be aware.
I'd also say a wet 2 or equivalent might not be fast enough for your intended purpose!, hazarding a guess you'll need a quicker sinking line for the Avon.Also bearing in mind some of the brute's that get caught there a single hander might not be the best line of approach.I feel very much you'll be cutting off your nose to spite your face.
Personally I'd look to a short double hander (to help you cast overhead and to control any fish you'll hook to boot! ), a Skagit line, T tips and flee's with not too much weight- maybe a tungsten cone!- but still plenty of wing length from a short leader.Honestly a Wet 2 won't be any where near fast enough!..Now you'll need to factor in the weight of the Skagit and the tips you'll be using if you're going to overhead cast or you'll break your rod!.
A chinese Skagit can be got for not a lot of outlay and then some T stuff lengths will see you in a far better place for the catching of catching Salar over a single hander and wf wet 2 line!.
As far as the Evans sinkers go, well they're bob on, actually density compensated and a touch quicker than a wet 2 of equivalent size at 3.3 ips, they fish a lot lot better than a DT wet cel 2, much more predictable.Another thing to be realised is the Evans lines are designed to be fished in conjunction with the Evans 10ft poly tips, being parallel the sink rate of his own polys are very well predictable and work very very well together.Not only is the sink rate at the business end maintained, but the extra length makes the lines much much better to cast.I hear some of you question the fastest sinker being a bag of spanners to cast?, well a similar sink rate of Evans poly sorts the front on that line out nicely.
The Intermediate is a wonderful line, worth a pop on any ones spare spool.The floater does work, but needs extending with a 15ft Airflo poly and at least 6ft of tippet.
For lovers of full lines, they're a great choice and will work very well indeed.
Pedro.
Thanks for all the replies everyone especially Jeff for the research on sinking rates paper and Rennie for the above.
The core strength of lines isn't something I'd considered so eternally grateful for that.
Perhaps I should explain my reasoning. I'm not that experienced at Spey casting but I do ok when I can at least get my feet in the water.
On 3 miles of river that I fish I can think of only 3 locations where this is at all possible. It's a mixed coarse/ game fishery and is no aquatic golf course with manicured banks. No complaints from me for that. It does though make Spey casting virtually impossible except in a few locations separated by miles.
I've got one or two 600gr Skagit lines which go very well on a 13'6 Guideline 9/10 and a 11' 6'' #9 switch rod. Each will easily cope with a 10' extra fast sink or Rio mow tip. Even with Hardy reels 6' of nylon or similar between the Skagit and the tip method. I have 30' of T18 waiting to be cut up to various lengths and looped.
I thought the #9, 11'6" was the answer but is a bit of a handful overhead with the 600gr Skagit.
The reasoning behind the single handed idea is THE WIND. Fishing up North is completely different to the Avon valley, which is why I love it up there. It obviously varies but I would suggest that on average you're fishing in a 3 mile wide wind corridor on the Avon more or less with no buffering.
Using the above mentioned outfits I recall a day last Spring.
2 of the wadeable locations are on the lower river and the weather app said Northerly winds, gusting to 23mph. Sounds quite benign doesn't it.
Put out a decent cast across the wind and as it's sinking through the air the wind grabs the Skagit and the floating running line and deposits it on the bank I'm fishing off!
Hence the desire to cut through the wind with something a lot denser than a floater set up that can be cast effectively in high winds and water and get fishing quick.
When a cast finally gets fishing with a 2" copper tube on the above setups it still only catches on the bottom in less than 4' of water coming around. Hence using lighter flies, sinking line.
 

Rennie

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Ah!, got you now Isisalar, quite a set of problems you find yourself with!.
So, revising my opinions now, maybe look to an intermediate carrier and some form of variable sink tips?, should beat the wind and let you get down where you need to?.
Now, Teeny do lines with lengths of T material welded to the front of a weight forward floater, designed to be used from single handed rods and light double handers.Quite short heads so easy to cast and the wind wont bother them at all, I've got T300, T400 and T 500 that I no longer use and sat in the Rennie Towers tackle storage facility (garage!).Have a rummage on t'interweb and if they might be of use to you we can sort something!,They'll certainly do the job you want them to!..A powerful 11ft 8/9 rod was what I used them off (Shakespeare Radial Glider!), or my 15ft 6 Sovereign rated 10. They're 27 yds long and I originally extended them with level running line they cast that far!, since removed the extension however. Won't be pretty!, but they'll get the job done!, gather they're quite popular in Tierra Del Fuego for those gurt big lumps of Argentinian Sea Toots in the howling gales that prevail there!..
Pedro.
 

Richardgw

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Ah!, got you now Isisalar, quite a set of problems you find yourself with!.
So, revising my opinions now, maybe look to an intermediate carrier and some form of variable sink tips?, should beat the wind and let you get down where you need to?.
For a short intermediate carrier (19/20ft) your may like to look at the Guideline Compact multi tip Intermediate /S3 body currently on sale direct from Guideline in 8/9 & 9/10 as a new model is on the way.


Another alternative is the Rio Scandi Intermediate body available UK in 7, 8 & 9 weights but this is 3ft longer. I have this in 9 weight and it is a fairly fast intermediate and mine can take up to 15ft of T10 but this is for spey casting – haven’t tried it overhead but this thread has got me thinking about using it overhead with just fast/super fast sinking Versileaders in place of a tip for handlining those deep pools normally reserved for spinning.
 
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