Singles for salmon

tony considine

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I have not caught many salmon on singles. A few by accident sea-trout fishing, a few by design using sea-trout gear,one on a 14s goldhead nymph.
None have fallen off.
I used to subscribe to the theory multiple hook points equals multiple hook-up chances. Sounds good,but not all hookholds are equal. The right place is so important.
I suspect salmon have a pretty strong grip when they sieze something,and can open their mouth and just let go. That might explain the strong pull which results in...nothing.Why didn't you hook that!? The fish had the fly in its' mouth.
Or the pull...splash...bye bye. We've all had a few of them.
You had a hookhold, but obviously the wrong one.
A treble is very likely to take hold in the area it is first gripped. A double less so,and may move a bit on the pull. A single is possibly more likely to slip until the point finds a hold somewhere soft,from then on further pressure just sinks it deeper.
Plenty of guesswork here,but it's something I've been chewing for a few seasons.
This season I intend to give singles a fair trial,when there are a few fish to catch
Has anyone already tried to do a comparison,say singles v doubles?
Can anyone recommend a good single? I have the usual black ironmongery ,but they haven't changed for fifty years.
I got some Varivas chinu hooks,size 8 and 6. Nice hooks,fine wire,forged,micro barb. Strong and sharp,but standard length shank.
I tied up a few salmon and sea-trout flies.
One thing that struck me,the salmon flies were very light. This will allow them to move more freely in reaction to any small variation in the current.
Could make them more interesting to a fish.
If anyone has already done this and is a convert to singles it would be interesting to know.
p.s. Don't look at my flies too closely.They never were works of art,but they do catch fish.
t.c.
 

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JACK POWER

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silver seeker

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I use several types of singles,sawada black spey and silver spey,Partridge Bartleet supremes and Partridge patriots,all good strong hooks,my favourite are the sawada spey pity they don't have them in smaller sizes.
SS
 

Jockiescott

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Most of my fishing this past few years has been with singles. Partridge Bartleet Supremes are my personal favourite and I have had plenty of success on them. My smaller stuff is mainly tied on Kamasan B175 trout singles.

I cannot say that I have noticed any reduction in hooked fish to landed fish. I have lost fish but not any more than I have lost fish on doubles and trebles in the past. My worst losing streak came about 10 years ago when I hooked 12 in week on trebles and didn't come close to landing one of them. Thankfully, I have not had a streak like that since! :eek:
 

miramichi

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I've always liked doubles, and have used a lot of both singles and doubles, but the law here is now singles only. I do think that you get a few more hook ups on doubles, but it would be a hard think to prove. With the law requiring strictly singles now in New Brunswick there is no debate. It is certainly true that singles are more quickly removed from fish, parr especially, and that is the justification.
I have tied on and fished with many different designs. To be honest I can't say that I've really found any much different than the others. I sure like the look of the Bartleet and Spey style hooks better than the standard salmon irons.
 

Soundmixer

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I love a good single hook!
I have tried most of the ones on the market that don't look like a circle, but the ones that I like best come from Veniard.

Osprey VH153 Stainless Saltwater | Veniard Osprey Hooks | Veniard Fly Tying

VH153 Saltwater.jpg

Wilky Shrimps, Willie Gunns, Vivians and my own old favourite with a long (3x the length of the hook) Collie Dog style wing in black and yellow have all had fish. I like the straight eye, the weight and the strong wire.

Treat them like a tube fly and fish them deep, fish them on a floating line and get a bit more depth. They are actually saltwater hooks so they don't come any smaller than an #8 which is a shame but the #2, #4 and #6 are excellent. Oh, and sea trout love 'em :cool:

Euan
 

tony considine

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Hi Soundmixer,
The Varivas hooks I just used are sea hooks and slightly inclined to circle.
This was intentional,I thought that might be good.
Do you think this is a wrong direction?
t.c.
 

tenet

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Never a problem with hook ups using Kamasan b175 in various sizes. See Hollywood's many posts on lough flies for salmon.
 

Soundmixer

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Hi Soundmixer,
The Varivas hooks I just used are sea hooks and slightly inclined to circle.
This was intentional,I thought that might be good.
Do you think this is a wrong direction?
t.c.

Not at all Tony. It is all about confidence in what you fish with and if they work for you then that is all that matters.
With the Osprey hooks I like the weight to get a bit more depth. I also like the length of the hook and the way that I can replicate a 1" tube but still have a muckle great point on the end!

Tenet,
Kamasan B175 is another favourite of mine, for all fresh water species.

There is an article in this months T&S about better hooking with micro trebles so once I have read it I may have more to say about singles :D

Euan
 

Fishybusiness

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I've been tying salmon and sea trout flies on singles for a while now, this week i have tied some with a tungsten bead to add a bit of weight to the fly,
I always use single hooks on my tube flies, you don't pick up as many leaves when fishing in the Autumn
 

buntinbee

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Singles

I've used singles for a few years now, particularly big singles in the spring and I can honestly say that I have lost no bigger a percentage of fish on them than doubles or trebles, possibly less. As a matter of interest I have had 11 salmon this season, all on big singles. The one day I decided to fish a smaller fly and used a double I lost two fish, maybe just coincidence of course. Long and short, I have every confidence in singles. No particular preference as to which model.
 

shepter

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A single hook will penetrate so much easier than a double, and a double will penetrate much easier than a treble on all flies and tubes, plugs and wobblers armed with 2 or 3 trebles should be taken off the market, as 1 is suffice
 

miramichi

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Another statement I've often heard is that long-shanked hooks - streamer hooks - lever against the hook and tend to pull it out. I use a lot of long-shanked streamers in the fall and I have not seen any real difference in the number of these fish that get off. I do think that fewer fish get off from something like a #2 then do when fishing an 8 or 10. Wider bite does seem to help hold on to fish. I suppose it is also possible that the larger hook can hurt the fish more. I look at ancient streamers on 3/0 hooks with quarter inch long barbs and I think "my god" it must be like being gaffed in the mouth.
 

GeeBee

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I always ONLY use a single - I use short shank hooks debarbed as less harmful to the fish.

I use OPST Swing hooks - made in Japan, they are strong and razor sharp.

touch wood, I haven't had a fish pull yet.
 

shepter

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I always ONLY use a single - I use short shank hooks debarbed as less harmful to the fish.

I use OPST Swing hooks - made in Japan, they are strong and razor sharp.

touch wood, I haven't had a fish pull yet.

You fishing wrong flies then, as you say you havent had a Pull ? thats how it reads ?
 
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Soundmixer

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So after way too long I finally got round to tying a fly on an Osprey single for this thread.
I do love a Blue Charm, especially with a wee tweek like this one. The hook is a #6 Veniard Osprey VH153. The straight eye is not everyones taste but the fish don't seem to mind.

IMG_3015.jpg

And this one on my last pound for scale.

IMG_3016.jpg

Cheers,

Euan
 

Dave7D

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Single salmon hooks

I have used single salmon hooks only for the 45+ years I have fished in Newfoundland. Even back when we could legally use doubles very few anglers here used them and trebles were never legal. I have kept detailed diary records. I have hooked over 1000 salmon with them and my caught to lost ratio is very close to 60 % to 40%. I don't know how this compares to typical caught lost ratios. I would imagine some of the fish that have taken my fly but did not get hooked might have been hooked on a multiple hook but I have no way to compare. But it is certainly easy to release a fish with them and I would think less fish are damaged by singles rather than multiple barbs, especially for accidentally hooked parr. About 90% of these salmon were grilse.
 

Dave7D

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Single hooks

My favourite hook for salmon fishing is the low water single mustad hook #90240. Sadly they don't make them anymore and I have not yet found a replacement that I like yet.
 

Loxie

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I use small trout singles for salmon fairly regularly, 10's, 12's and 14's. Sometimes barbless as well. I don't think I loose anymore on them than any other hook. In fairness I don't loose many on anything since I found out how crucial using the softest rods with small weak hooks, and conversely stronger stiffer rods with big thick wire hooks. Hooking the fish in the first place may well be a different matter though! The most effective converter of takes to landed fish I've used is a small thin wire treble, ideally a B990 10, 12 or 14, and fished free hanging. The trouble is they kill parr and small trout.
 

Hemmy

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I use small trout singles for salmon fairly regularly, 10's, 12's and 14's. Sometimes barbless as well. I don't think I loose anymore on them than any other hook. In fairness I don't loose many on anything since I found out how crucial using the softest rods with small weak hooks, and conversely stronger stiffer rods with big thick wire hooks. Hooking the fish in the first place may well be a different matter though! The most effective converter of takes to landed fish I've used is a small thin wire treble, ideally a B990 10, 12 or 14, and fished free hanging. The trouble is they kill parr and small trout.


I've never fished free hanging hooks but intend to give it a go.....do you fix plastic to the hook ?
 

Loxie

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I've never fished free hanging hooks but intend to give it a go.....do you fix plastic to the hook ?

I make a 3mm plastic tube in different thicknesses from the thinnest single tube to a lined 2mm OD one, with the liner only about 1mm. I burr the top with a lighter to make a smooth round finish. It takes no time to make a few. These protect the knot and make a low friction contact point on the back of the fly.
 

Salty_Minnow

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a good tip for protecting the knot with free swinging hooks.

-Slide your tube fly on up the tippet
-cut a very small slither about 1mm of silicone tubing
-slide the silicone tubing up the tippet
-bring the tippet up and over and through the silicone tubing again
-pull tippet closed so the silcone tubing pulls tight onto your line
-Tie your hook on and you have a great, easy knot protector

a pal of mine invented this back in the mid-90's
 
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