Single Spey - any advice welcome

Finglas

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No idea if I’ve managed to successfully attach this video of me casting. If I have, then all critiques are welcome. Think I’m probably drifting too far forward on the forward stroke and not giving it enough of a distinct stop.

Any tips would be very welcome.

jamie
 

Tangled

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I'm no casting expert but there doesn't look much wrong with that - if you chucked it much further you'd be in the tree.

A guide would criticise you for walking after casting though - “stay put and fish out the ******* cast”. He'd also probably tell you to put a mend in too - but depends on where and what you're fishing.
 

Fredzefisher

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Its very difficult to comment on the rights and wrongs of a spey cast! Every single angler I know has a different method, every rod and every line has a different anchor point. A stiffer rod requires a different action to one wth more flex. From what I can see, your fly is turning over at the end of the cast and the line is landing straight which, in my opinion, is the most important thing to acheive as your fly is fishing from the moment it hits the water. Without a shadow of doubt I have had more takes within the first few seconds of a fly hitting the water - which should mean that it is fishing correctly from the moment of impact. My only concern would be using your cast with a high bank or trees closer behind, as your rod travels behind you a bit more than I would be happier with. However, as said there is nothing wrong with the cast (slightly agree with Tangled about the movement!)
 
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Finglas

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I'm no casting expert but there doesn't look much wrong with that - if you chucked it much further you'd be in the tree.

A guide would criticise you for walking after casting though - “stay put and fish out the ******* cast”. He'd also probably tell you to put a mend in too - but depends on where and what you're fishing.

thanks tangled. I wouldn’t normally walk like that but was just casting for filming purposes and working my way down quickly to focus on a hotspot. I suppose on occasion I do cast and walk when I’m trying to let the fly sink a little and come up as it swings!
Thanks
 

keirstream

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I'm no casting expert but there doesn't look much wrong with that - if you chucked it much further you'd be in the tree.

A guide would criticise you for walking after casting though - “stay put and fish out the ******* cast”. He'd also probably tell you to put a mend in too - but depends on where and what you're fishing.
Hehehehe.:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
I remember the ghillie on Carlogie before Sean Stanton, Davy Brand if I remember correctly,
chastised me for the exact same thing.
"The saumun dinna like meals on wheels Sir" were his exact words.
Don't know how true that was but it certainly influenced me to take more time going through a pool.(y)(y)
 

Springer

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Compared to many people those casts are reasonable, there is quite a lot of things you are doing right but to unlock the full potential of your outfit you need to take a clue from its name - its a two handed fly rod. ;)
 

charlieH

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Remember that we go fishing, not casting, and that the cast is only a means to an end and not the end itself - it all comes down to placing the fly out there so we can show it to the fish in the way we would like. Provided you're managing to do that (and it looks as though you are) then I don't think you need to be too worried - because the fish won't give a damn about the rest of it! At a guess, I'd say you're shooting about 12-15' of running line into each cast, and it's straightening out nicely before it hits the water. If you were shooting 25-30' you might want to make the stop a bit higher and sharper, but I see no need to do so in this instance. Firing the line out higher than necessary will just cause you problems on a windy day.

I was looking at this little film from Ian Gordon a few days ago, and was struck by the point he reiterates several times in the course of it - that we all need to find our own particular style of casting, and that there's no single right way to do it. Traditional or modern style, top or bottom hand dominant, it really doesn't much matter so long as the fly is getting out to where the fish are, at the end of a nice straight line.

 
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Rennie

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That little clip is absolutely bob on! as indeed are your comments about us all finding our own style charlieH!. None of us are the same physically, have the same degree of strength or the mental capacity to work every thing out in the same way. Some will be incredibly focused, others so laid back they'll be almost asleep on the bank. Some will be on the water most days, whilst others get a couple of weeks worth a year.
It's impossible for us all to be the same and do it in the same manner!, accept that and adapt your own style, as long as you get everything out where it needs to be with as little fuss and effort as possible, then jobs a good un!. Bare in mind, we're fishing not entering a casting comp.!
Most fishing cast's won't win a casting comp., but by the same proviso a lot of casting comp. cast's won't get a fish either!- too noisy and a lack of presentation too!.
Pedro.

P.S 1/2 the time, I couldn't win either!.
 

chriswjx

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My 2p, not sure what you're like after letting the cast swing fully round? I know I personally find it much harder setting a consistent anchor casting a single spey from doing a full swing round.

Casting as it is in your video, it looks more of a "jump roll", i.e. little angle change? For myself, as soon as I add the change of direction (60° or 90°), the position of my anchor goes all over the place every single cast (though last time I was out for the season, I think I might have cracked what I was doing wrong, moving the top hand too far back in the swing). For practice, I'm usually just trying to cast/re-cast as quick as possible, so will single spey out say 90°, strip in and snake roll down the bank as if it had fully drifted round. The other thing I would try (as this is something I was cautioned about) was keeping the timing consistent between each cast, especially for the initial lift of the rod tip. Its unique to every caster/rod/line, but once work out, nailing it down consistently is my current goal.

As others have said, nowt wrong with that cast to fish, fly is getting where you need it (we're fishing not casting as has been said by many). But I'm fully of the camp that every cast can be better, and like to think to myself as it's swinging round, what can I do to improve myself. Especially as I only can get out fishing every other Saturday during the season (if I'm lucky)...
 

Finglas

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Thanks all, appreciate the comments. One of the problems I seem to get from time to time is the fly trailing and catching on the leader. It’s almost like the loop is too tight. I’m not sure if maybe the stop on the back stroke isn’t high enough relative to the point at which the power applied on the forward stroke.
If that makes any sense…… but yes any tips in that area would be greatly appreciated!

jamie
 

chriswjx

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Thanks all, appreciate the comments. One of the problems I seem to get from time to time is the fly trailing and catching on the leader. It’s almost like the loop is too tight. I’m not sure if maybe the stop on the back stroke isn’t high enough relative to the point at which the power applied on the forward stroke.
If that makes any sense…… but yes any tips in that area would be greatly appreciated!

jamie

When that happens to me, its usually because the anchor point's not far up enough compared to where I'm casting?

For example looking at the 2nd and 3rd casts you made, the difference in where the anchor point was? If you had been casting a wider angle, the 3rd cast's anchor might not have come round enough and you may have tangled?

This is all just conjecture on my part from when I watch my own casting, as whilst I've only been at this for a year, I can safely say I've managed to do exactly as you describe (or at least what I think your describing?). Having seen Scott mackenzie casting, I don't think there's such a thing as "too far back" 😅
 

Springer

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When that happens to me, its usually because the anchor point's not far up enough compared to where I'm casting?

For example looking at the 2nd and 3rd casts you made, the difference in where the anchor point was? If you had been casting a wider angle, the 3rd cast's anchor might not have come round enough and you may have tangled?

This is all just conjecture on my part from when I watch my own casting, as whilst I've only been at this for a year, I can safely say I've managed to do exactly as you describe (or at least what I think your describing?). Having seen Scott mackenzie casting, I don't think there's such a thing as "too far back" 😅

This lad is on the right track with his advice.

Your anchor isnt in the correct place relative to where your aiming the cast, it needs to be further behind you. The comment I made about it being a two handed rod is that you are top hand dominant and you are using your top hand to drag the line upstream into the d-loop and its not getting there. If you push out with the bottom hand against a top hand that stays closer to your chest and turn your body then the leverage from the rod and strength from your legs and torso will make moving the line upstream so much easier, this is how tournament casters can move 105" of line relatively easily into a d-loop.

When you look at your hand/arm positions immediately prior to starting the forward cast they are then not in a position that would allow you to pull with the bottom hand on the forward cast and push less with the top hand, as such you push and the rod tipped it ends up dropping towards the water, its generally an inefficient way to use a two handed rod.
 

Springer

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Your anchor gets the furthest back on the second cast compared to the others but it should still be hitting the water much nearer the edge of this shot for the direction change your trying to achieve, if the anchor was half in and half out of the edge of the shot it would be about right.
Screen Shot 2021-12-06 at 22.24.48.png


Face your target with your hips and shoulders relaxed, put the rod across your chest until it touches both shoulders while you still face your target, the rod should now be at 90 degrees to your line to the target. Now look to your right and tap the water with your rod tip, thats where your anchor needs to land.
 

westie4566

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Your anchor gets the furthest back on the second cast compared to the others but it should still be hitting the water much nearer the edge of this shot for the direction change your trying to achieve, if the anchor was half in and half out of the edge of the shot it would be about right.View attachment 69542

Face your target with your hips and shoulders relaxed, put the rod across your chest until it touches both shoulders while you still face your target, the rod should now be at 90 degrees to your line to the target. Now look to your right and tap the water with your rod tip, thats where your anchor needs to land.
You gave that advice years ago on here and I took it onboard, helped me no end. (y)

When I finally forced myself to stop fannying about and actually deal with my left hand up casting using the bottom hand (my dominant one as a right hander) more helped a lot and the penny dropped re using it more the other way round.

I'm still no expert, nor never will be, 40 years of faults from having to learn on my own can never be undone!

That said I've had real compliments from both a Dee and Spey ghille. The Spey one, if you can cast and cover that pool like that you're welcome on my beat anytime. The Dee ghillie. 'You're a lazy caster'. Me, I was 'whit'!!?? He laughed and said you use minimum effort from you and get maximum effort from your rod - that's they way it should be.

That'll do me!

Yours
Still learning form Aberdeen.
 

Rrrr

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You gave that advice years ago on here and I took it onboard, helped me no end. (y)

When I finally forced myself to stop fannying about and actually deal with my left hand up casting using the bottom hand (my dominant one as a right hander) more helped a lot and the penny dropped re using it more the other way round.

I'm still no expert, nor never will be, 40 years of faults from having to learn on my own can never be undone!

That said I've had real compliments from both a Dee and Spey ghille. The Spey one, if you can cast and cover that pool like that you're welcome on my beat anytime. The Dee ghillie. 'You're a lazy caster'. Me, I was 'whit'!!?? He laughed and said you use minimum effort from you and get maximum effort from your rod - that's they way it should be.

That'll do me!

Yours
Still learning form Aberdeen.
I think my single spey comes into the category of "it aint pretty but it works". Im usualy trying to dodge far bank trees/things behind me and im more worried about the flys landing position than anything else so tight loops flying through the air can end in disaster.
When on the tyne with space to spare it takes me an hour or so to get back into big d loops and high stops.

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Finglas

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Your anchor gets the furthest back on the second cast compared to the others but it should still be hitting the water much nearer the edge of this shot for the direction change your trying to achieve, if the anchor was half in and half out of the edge of the shot it would be about right.View attachment 69542

Face your target with your hips and shoulders relaxed, put the rod across your chest until it touches both shoulders while you still face your target, the rod should now be at 90 degrees to your line to the target. Now look to your right and tap the water with your rod tip, thats where your anchor needs to land.

thanks springer, really appreciate your advice. I’ve never heard that idea before about the rod across the chest so I will definitely give it a bash. Thank you!

jamie
 

ozzyian

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View attachment 69474
No idea if I’ve managed to successfully attach this video of me casting. If I have, then all critiques are welcome. Think I’m probably drifting too far forward on the forward stroke and not giving it enough of a distinct stop.

Any tips would be very welcome.

jamie

Looks all right, what setup is that you are using there?

I'm really not the sort of bloke to offer advice but I remember a very good caster did something once that improved my technique in one simple way. He was standing next to me in the water watching the cast and not saying anything then suddenly at the release point he bellowed STOP! I almost crapped myself it was so unexpected :) He then laughed and said 'you'll remember that! and try and aim a bit higher too'

His point was that the hard stop and the high aim together unleash a lot of potential in an otherwise sound technique. That was with a spey line (which is why I asked) and it did make a big difference to me. When my casting gets a bit sloppy I start at the hard stop and work back from there, normally after 2 or 3 casts the casting is back on track.
 
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