Scottish Parliament Inquiry into Salmon Farming Agreed

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A formal Petition, lodged in the Scottish Parliament in February 2016* by Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland, seeking protection for wild salmonids from sea lice from Scottish salmon farms, has resulted in MSPs launching an Inquiry into the salmon farming industry in Scotland.

The Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee of MSPs agreed at Holyrood this week to conduct a full-blown Inquiry into salmon farming in Scotland and the issues raised in S&TCS’ Petition.

Guy Linley-Adams, for S&TCS, said:
“We are delighted that MSPs of all parties have shown such concern and interest and we thank them for launching this Inquiry. This will enable S&TCS to bring all MSPs attention to what they can do to protect Scotland’s iconic wild salmon and sea trout, and the wider Scottish environment, from the damage it is currently suffering as a result of salmon farming in marine open cages.

“This is a vindication of what S&TCS has been saying for some years. It hasn’t always been a very popular message in some quarters, but the message has now got through and MSPs have taken the first steps towards a solution”.

S&TCS’ Aquaculture Campaign’s 2016 Petition recommends that the Scottish Parliament should seek to amend the Aquaculture and Fisheries (Scotland) Act 2007 to give Scottish Ministers a statutory duty to inspect farms and enforce sea lice control on salmon farms. This is for the express purpose of protecting wild salmonid fish from juvenile sea lice infestation from marine cage fish farms, and statutory powers to order immediate culls of any marine cage fish farm where average adult female sea lice numbers of farmed fish remain persistently above Code of Good Practice thresholds.

Over the medium term, S&TCS argues that those farms consistently failing to control sea lice should be closed or relocated to move the worst performing farms away from salmonid rivers and migration routes.

Finally, S&TCS supports a renewed focus on moving to full closed containment of farmed salmon production in Scotland, with complete ‘biological separation’ of wild and farmed fish.

*Fisheries scientists – including the Scottish Government’s own scientists – are firm in their conclusions that sea lice produced on fish-farms harm wild salmon and sea trout, both at an individual and at a population level.

However, S&TCS believes that these threats are not being addressed by effective regulation and control of sea lice numbers on fish-farms in Scotland, which are essential to protect wild fish populations, many already significantly reduced.

In 2016, the S&TCS raised a formal Petition to the Scottish Parliament, which seeks to change the law, firstly to require immediate culls or harvesting of farmed where sea lice numbers have effectively gone out of control and secondly to give fish farm inspectors the legal duty to control sea lice on fish farms, expressly to protect wild fish populations from juvenile sea lice infestation from marine cage fish farms.

The Petition has been considered by the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee.


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goosander

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Step in the right direction but it will not happen tomorrow.
Would be a good point to see what benefits salmon farming has for us. Being mainly/wholly owned by foreign company's any profits will not be left here. How many local jobs full time it creates.
Bob
 

Invermarnoch

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Salmon farming inquiry

Watch the industry's big lie machines swing into action here.

See article T&S August issue p. 43.

The problem here is that the SNP Scottish government are a bunch of single-issue nonentities. As Andrew Neil pointed out, the Scottish Parliament spent something like 47 hours debating Indyref2 and no hours on Scottish Education. No wonder they did not want to discuss it - it's a disaster, as any teacher will tell you. Speak to any doctor working in the NHS - too many managers, not enough doctors. And in my own profession, the Judicial Appointments Board is a laughing stock.

If you want to do something about salmon farming, just refuse to eat the stuff, tell others about the damage this industry has done to the environment, write to your MSP, cut out the T & S article and photocopy it, then put it on as many car windscreens as you can find.
 

castor

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I agree with every word posted by Invermarnoch.

It is exceptionally unlikely that any review will be completed and acted upon until the interests of the salmon farming industry are prepared to agree.

What is happening is that HMSG, already well aware of the disgrace of present methods used by the saline aquaculture sector, is buying time. As research is afoot regarding deepwater farming methods [and also 'on land' tank farming such as that experiment on an old airfield in England] the finalisation of any report will coincide with new methods...10 years at a guess. However, being so regardless of fiscal responsibility, HMSG will doubtless give the industry as much time as it needs; after all HMSG fondly believes that the farmers who have not yet received their EEC grant money will turn a blind eye to their problems. The clock will tick... and tick...and tick.

Incidentally, is anyone aware of where the money which farmers so badly need resides...in reality, not just on paper?
 
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fachabala

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Took the very words out me mouth :cool:

Just watch the denial brigade bringing out their big guns,,and the usual hogwash as regs creating numerous jobs in rural areas,while turning a blind eye to the destruction of our seatrout and salmon populations over vast areas of the west coast of Scotland and beyond :mad::mad:
 

goosander

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Another full page article on the salmon farming in todays Sunday Herald talking about S.E.P,A.
Keep wondering how many jobs in back of beyond places are created for the locals by the fish farmers compared to ones lost my gillies/hotels/B. and B places etc. Would not be surprised to find more lost than gained.
Bob.
 

Roag Fisher

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Another full page article on the salmon farming in todays Sunday Herald talking about S.E.P,A.
Keep wondering how many jobs in back of beyond places are created for the locals by the fish farmers compared to ones lost my gillies/hotels/B. and B places etc. Would not be surprised to find more lost than gained.
Bob.

I was waiting for this tack to be tried. Not one job would be created on fisheries in my part of the world if the aquaculture industry was shut down (which is essentially what would happen if closed containment was forced on the industry). I could also factor in rates of pay as well as seasonal jobs versus full time jobs.
 

ibm59

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I was waiting for this tack to be tried. Not one job would be created on fisheries in my part of the world if the aquaculture industry was shut down (which is essentially what would happen if closed containment was forced on the industry). I could also factor in rates of pay as well as seasonal jobs versus full time jobs.

Could you also factor in how many of the multitude of positions created are filled by migrant labour?
Genuine question .

And while you're at it .....check out post 21.
You seem to have recovered from your farming fatigue.


http://www.salmonfishingforum.com/forums/thread154826-3.html#post985725
 
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Roag Fisher

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ibm59

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Define "migrant". I am working on the Conon next week. Does that make me a "migrant"?

Ever considered a career in politics ?:rolleyes:

Why not just answer the question ?:)
 
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castor

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I have gone in to it all in detail in the past. You can find it all in old threads.
Define "migrant". I am working on the Conon next week. Does that make me a "migrant"?



My take on this is that this is meant to be a dedicated salmon fishing (for sport) forum: covering that subject is the reason for its existence.
It is NOT a forum covering the socio-economic state of the regions in which the NATURAL returning salmon is to be found, although it is impossible to ignore such matters. Knowing that some regions in which salmon are found in their natural state have vast economic difficulties, employing migrant workers (those from countries which have even worse economies than those regions themselves), despite that any profits are largely (90%+?) exported as are any wage-surplus of very many workers, it seems strange to me that the locals themselves allow their natural heritage to be risked in such a reckless business as the salmon farming industry with its present methods. That few locals work in the less well paid end of the business indicates that they are better off - even if unemployed.

Another sadness is that this is now a split thread. This gives some people who have not answered perfectly legitimate questions on the earlier thread a chance to escape! In particular Roag Fisher is at risk of being seen as running with the hounds and hunting with the hare.

Yet another total horror is the fact that some fishermen return what are clearly 'escapee' farm fish to the rivers and loughs. Are they aware that the farmed fish are not only capable of breeding with the native stock (what there is of it) and that the great majority of farm fish are now of 100% Norwegian origin in their own lifetime?

The old Duke of Westminster cross bred sea trout imported from the Baltic and Norway to stock Loch Stack and the Laxford. After his death the strain died out very quickly indeed. By allowing farmed Norwegian stock to cross breed with native salmon is to play God with genetics - without any certainty that to do so may result in permanent extinction of traditional, iconic, Scottish Salmon. throughout the West Coast and Island river systems.
 
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