Salmon Reels for UK....Do we really need a good drag system and top end prices??

hairyscotsman

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I am in the market for a new salmon reel and i have been thinking about the fish i have caught with my trusty trion which has not let me down in 15 plus years .
I tend to always play my salmon on a very light drag and have landed fish up to 20lb with relative ease and have not needed to turn the drag up really high on any fish.
My question is do we really need to use a super duper drag system or like so much in salmon angling these days are the modern reels and high end prices just another excuse for us to be tackle tarts ? Are we really just paying for the aesthetics ?
I do like spending my hard earned on good rods such as the loomis stinger and sage tcx but have so far refrained from buying expensive reels...Am i missing a trick or better buying another rod to add to my arsenal and keeping on the cheaper end of the reel market .
The majority of my fishing is on rivers the size of north esk with the odd trip to tummel ...
I appreciate there will always be the very odd chance of a monster stripping line at the rate of knots but with 200yds backing etc is it so important to have that expensive sealed drag...
I would love to hear others views on this before my christmas list hits santa !!
 
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westie4566

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Hi Richard.

TBH...yes, for me anyway.

It's nothing to do with super duper train stopping drag for me, just plain old reliability.

Had too many other cheaper reels let me down as the drag wasn't up to much if it got wet. Almost lost a liced 15lber a few years back when the drag on a Grey's reel suddenly went into free spool. Played the fish on half a head before my mate got a chance to net it!!

Nowt wrong with the old Trion. I use it's cousin the President on my switch rod. Other than that it's my Evotec HD 9-13 on the 13' rod and the Megaloop on the 15' rod. Good reliable drag systems you can trust.

Just my tuppence worth.:)
 

Loxie

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For the most part I don’t think you need much in the way of fancy drags. I like just enough drag to prevent overruns and to use my hand to actually play the fish. My best fish was landed on a trion, one of 5 averaging 18lb that I caught that day. That was in a big nasty river in the early season. I like Danielsson and Lamson reels because they are nice, not because I need them.
 

castor

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I have been using Bogdan Copies for nearly 20 years...they have one of the best brake/drags ever and have the advantage of being heavy enough to balance most modern rods from 14' up.

That said I find that I am just as happy with the solid old Beaudex reels. I set the drag for being strong enough to stop the reel overrunning and use my fingers on the inside of the spool as a brake. That is the way I learned to fish over 60 years ago, so it came back very quickly as a conditioned reflex. But I agree that there is nothing as nasty as a bad brake. If you have that problem set it to the lightest possible usable setting and learn to use your fingers on the drum. Much as I like the Hardy Perfects of yesteryear - and I had them in every size from 31/2" to 41/2" - I gave up on them as they have a horrible habit of cracking across a web. I also made a very handy profit! To avoid this risk they have to be treated with utmost care. Cast alloy has this propensity to crack and is very difficult to repair nicely.

If you feel that a brake is necessary, a good relatively inexpensive reel is the original SA System II. It can be improved a lot by fitting the brake disc on a suitable size bolt with a nut + locking-nut holding the disk well in place, put the bolt in an electric drill and polish the disc with fine polishing paper and then a propriety metal polish. Reassemble the reel and you are guaranteed to like the result.

Remember that as the line empties from the reel the braking effect increases, so never set the initial setting too strong and be ready to back-off the setting as line empties.
 

hairyscotsman

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Hi Richard.

TBH...yes, for me anyway.

It's nothing to do with super duper train stopping drag for me, just plain old reliability.

Had too many other cheaper reels let me down as the drag wasn't up to much if it got wet. Almost lost a liced 15lber a few years back when the drag on a Grey's reel suddenly went into free spool. Played the fish on half a head before my mate got a chance to net it!!

Nowt wrong with the old Trion. I use it's cousin the President on my switch rod. Other than that it's my Evotec HD 9-13 on the 13' rod and the Megaloop on the 15' rod. Good reliable drag systems you can trust.

Just my tuppence worth.:)
Thanks Andy..Yes i appreciate the need for a reliable drag and if that can be had at a good price all the better !! ;)
I do also like nice things and had a lovely lamson litespeed reel for my 5 weight trout rod many moons ago and loved it (although the dollar exchange rate and it was used made it a great deal)...nothing to do with drag right enough.....hmmmm ...the words rock and hard place spring to mind...:confused:
 
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HOWKEMOOT

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Modern reels are a rip off

How can manufacturers have the brass neck to charge what they do for reels today. There is less material in a modern reel, most are mass made made in low economy countries, they are are created in a cnc factory, boyo boy how can they charge so much !! I am still using a couple of Hardy Marquis salmon No2 that are plus of 35yrs and still going strong after a life of abuse and a bit of tlc at Alnwick.

M
 

Lamson v10

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I've been using lamson reels for about 13 years now and have quite a few of them trout and salmon, I'm yet to have a problem with any of them and they also look good in my opinion, the sealed drag they have is fantastic but wether or not you need as strong a drag it's good to know it's there IF needed, not that it was today
 
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rs2ford

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I like a reel with a smooth and strong drag, and a good finish that is not going to scratch everytime you put it down. It also must be large arbor and balance what ever rod I am using, and can be bought for a reasonable price.
Danielsson reels tick all the boxes.

Cheers Diarmid.
 

heather point

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These super expensive reels are all very well if that is how you want to spend your hard earned.
Alternatively, if you want something that does the job just as well at a fraction of the price, then a System 2, Leeda Magnum Disc or going slightly up market, a Hardy Marquis will fit the bill.
Any of these will handle any salmon that has ever swum up a British river but if you want something a bit more shiny, on you go.
I had 14 fish in four days last week on a Marquis No 2 and the reason I used it rather than the Magnum for only because it had the right line on it.
 

Walleye

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How can manufacturers have the brass neck to charge what they do for reels today. There is less material in a modern reel, most are mass made made in low economy countries, they are are created in a cnc factory, boyo boy how can they charge so much !! I am still using a couple of Hardy Marquis salmon No2 that are plus of 35yrs and still going strong after a life of abuse and a bit of tlc at Alnwick.

M
Design, R&D, marketing, customer service costs etc need to be paid for from every reel and rod sold. Manufacturing costs are irrelevant if you want a beautifully engineered high quality reliable rod or reel from a trusted manufacturer which will be around in future to offer excellent service when you need it most.

I've seen some cheap reels where the only reason they could sell at that price is through no R&D (copy), outsourced design in places like Vietnam, hammering down part cost through using low quality materials, very low cost assembly houses in **** working conditions and little or no customer service with limited warranty. Some are almost consumable items.

I'm not making judgement on either end of the market. The good things are that the choice is there for everyone to make according to what they value and the entry cost to salmon fishing is not too high.
 

Loxie

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Design, R&D, marketing, customer service costs etc need to be paid for from every reel and rod sold. Manufacturing costs are irrelevant if you want a beautifully engineered high quality reliable rod or reel from a trusted manufacturer which will be around in future to offer excellent service when you need it most.

I've seen some cheap reels where the only reason they could sell at that price is through no R&D (copy), outsourced design in places like Vietnam, hammering down part cost through using low quality materials, very low cost assembly houses in **** working conditions and little or no customer service with limited warranty. Some are almost consumable items.

I'm not making judgement on either end of the market. The good things are that the choice is there for everyone to make according to what they value and the entry cost to salmon fishing is not too high.
The sad truth is that the market is small and getting smaller. That will inevitably make the price higher as fixed costs are spread across a smaller base.
 

ozzyian

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I've been using lamson reels for about 13 years now and have quite a few of them trout and salmon, I'm yet to have a problem with any of them and they also look good in my opinion, the sealed drag they have is fantastic but wether or not you need as strong a drag it's good to know it's there IF needed, not that it was today
Lamsons do have pretty advanced 3 axis machining (to be admired from a technical viewpoint) and the drags have a great reputation (though probably not that necessary in the UK - I think most of the drag is generally courtesy of the line) I just bought a Lightspeed and although I didnt pay that much for it I was pretty shocked at that rubbish plastic clicker - does it not annoy you in an otherwise nicely engineered bit of equipment?:)
 

castor

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How can manufacturers have the brass neck to charge what they do for reels today. There is less material in a modern reel, most are mass made made in low economy countries, they are are created in a cnc factory, boyo boy how can they charge so much !! I am still using a couple of Hardy Marquis salmon No2 that are plus of 35yrs and still going strong after a life of abuse and a bit of tlc at Alnwick.

M
If you google 'fly-reel' and see just how large the number of makers actually is for branded reels, you will realise that given any spread of popularity no one maker is going to cover their overheads, let alone set-up, distribution and profit. Once upon a time when I was young there were very few makers to choose between and most of those available in the UK were British made and although Hardy reels were expensive, even they were realisable for a big number of people. Other makers covered the ground at down to bargain prices. Virtually all produced good reels.

Nowadays most of the 'want list' reels are not UK made. Most so called Spey Reels were designed as warm water sea reels for use with single handed rods, with a very strong braking system and a large line capacity....they are generally over specified in all directions and are usually too light for two handed salmon rods. The marketeers saw a chance for a catch-profit by also offering these reels as salmon/steelhead reels. The Americans have for a very long time used single handed rods for salmon and steelhead and a good braking system makes life easier for these people...the resurgence of the two-handed rod is quite recent. They were a ready buyer for the likes of Abel, Galvin, Ross et al. This way started the craze for these flashy and expensive trinkets. The 'over strong' brakes are needed with a 180lb Tarpon (or any other strong sea fish) at the other end of the line. With so many makers and models in the market they cannot hope to have an outright winner, so their costs per reel sold are higher...and then there is the advertising and promotional budget to cover.

A further reason is the scourge of the collector...I know one guy who has some 27 Bogdan salmon reels, another with at least 18! These reels have now increased in price on the second hand market solely due to pressure from greedy, rich collectors, who mostly don't fish more than one or two of their 'collection'. The same applies to many Hardy models, led by the lead finished Perfect range...even the painted versions are a ridiculous price.

Yet on the UK secondhand market there are loads of cheap, reliable salmon fly reels which can be bought for a song, whereas a good Bogdan 400M will cost upward of US$4000, plus some 22% import duty and tax, all plus VAT to legally import to the UK...these charges may be wrong, but are still a lot of bread. Yet you can get a good Beaudex 4"W for less than £40.00. They have no social cachet - but they do the job as well as a multi thousand classic / or titanium reel!! I have some excellent reels, but wanted a few more as I fish a greater number of lines these days. When I saw todays costs for top reels, I immediately bought 3 old Beaudex and a Farlows Aquaria all for just a few quid over £100.00 including decent, usable backing! Guess what? I am perfectly happy with these reels, I have no doubts about their functional ability.
 
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Lamson v10

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Lamsons do have pretty advanced 3 axis machining (to be admired from a technical viewpoint) and the drags have a great reputation (though probably not that necessary in the UK - I think most of the drag is generally courtesy of the line) I just bought a Lightspeed and although I didnt pay that much for it I was pretty shocked at that rubbish plastic clicker - does it not annoy you in an otherwise nicely engineered bit of equipment?:)
No :D
 

Dave Carne

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I have a pair of Angels - costly reels (though I traded one for classic salmon flies and the other is very good second hand off eBay) - but I must admit I never use the drag since I always play off the rim as I think it's by far the best way to respond to the fish's runs, jumps etc - you simply cannot adjust a drag quick enough (if that's all you're using to play the fish) and therefore sometimes it'll be too tight and others too lose - obviously significantly increasing the likelihood you'll lose the fish.

That said, I have cheap reels too that whilst initially having a lovely smooth retrieve etc have gone 'sticky' as a result of a hard fight bending the spindle - still usable but not the reel they ought to be.

Providing a reel is of reasonable quality and it has a unobstructed rim you can play off - I think the BIG consideration should be weight - ie being sufficiently heavy to balance the rod properly - my 11/12 Angels are heavy reels; you'd think FAR too heavy for the #9 13 footer I'm using them with - but in fact they balance the setup perfectly, with the result that I can fish all day with no issues (despite having a slipped disc in my neck - I never even stop for lunch), if they were featherweight reels like say Lamsons I'd be crippled by lunch.

Dx
 

doubletaper

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Paying For The Name Sometimes?

I've been using Leeda magnums/Hardy Marquis 3's for a few years and have never encountered any problems. At the end of the day my friend makes me laugh when we discuss silly priced reels "saying" (there just a ****** bobbin holder) Not strictly correct but I get his gist and if you can afford it why not? I would rather invest in a Rod/Line first personally. And the deposit for the next trip. :eek: I suppose it's the same with clothing, there's some decent cheap gear & some not so decent expensive gear. My Simms waders leaked after 12 months & my Hardy EWS wading jackets cuffs started to come adrift after one season?? :mad: I now buy my fishing clothing from Go Outdoors Millets etc but they don't come with a decent fishing logo badge though, warm & dry never the less mind.
 

HOWKEMOOT

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Absolutely

If you google 'fly-reel' and see just how large the number of makers actually is for branded reels, you will realise that given any spread of popularity no one maker is going to cover their overheads, let alone set-up, distribution and profit. Once upon a time when I was young there were very few makers to choose between and most of those available in the UK were British made and although Hardy reels were expensive, even they were realisable for a big number of people. Other makers covered the ground at down to bargain prices. Virtually all produced good reels.

Nowadays most of the 'want list' reels are not UK made. Most so called Spey Reels were designed as warm water sea reels for use with single handed rods, with a very strong braking system and a large line capacity....they are generally over specified in all directions and are usually too light for two handed salmon rods. The marketeers saw a chance for a catch-profit by also offering these reels as salmon/steelhead reels. The Americans have for a very long time used single handed rods for salmon and steelhead and a good braking system makes life easier for these people...the resurgence of the two-handed rod is quite recent. They were a ready buyer for the likes of Abel, Galvin, Ross et al. This way started the craze for these flashy and expensive trinkets. The 'over strong' brakes are needed with a 180lb Tarpon (or any other strong sea fish) at the other end of the line. With so many makers and models in the market they cannot hope to have an outright winner, so their costs per reel sold are higher...and then there is the advertising and promotional budget to cover.

A further reason is the scourge of the collector...I know one guy who has some 27 Bogdan salmon reels, another with at least 18! These reels have now increased in price on the second hand market solely due to pressure from greedy, rich collectors, who mostly don't fish more than one or two of their 'collection'. The same applies to many Hardy models, led by the lead finished Perfect range...even the painted versions are a ridiculous price.

Yet on the UK secondhand market there are loads of cheap, reliable salmon fly reels which can be bought for a song, whereas a good Bogdan 400M will cost upward of US$4000, plus some 22% import duty and tax, all plus VAT to legally import to the UK...these charges may be wrong, but are still a lot of bread. Yet you can get a good Beaudex 4"W for less than £40.00. They have no social cachet - but they do the job as well as a multi thousand classic / or titanium reel!! I have some excellent reels, but wanted a few more as I fish a greater number of lines these days. When I saw todays costs for top reels, I immediately bought 3 old Beaudex and a Farlows Aquaria all for just a few quid over £100.00 including decent, usable backing! Guess what? I am perfectly happy with these reels, I have no doubts about their functional ability.
Well said Castor, spot on.

M
 

Rennie

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Like a nice reel, not over the top and not too basically functional either.I like Hardy Reels,use them most of the time and we get on just fine.Agree whole heartedly about the American Salt water reels with a dual purpose side of salmon fishing,Wayyyyy over the top.Indeed,most drag/brake systems are way too much for UK based Salmon fishing, a broad range of usability is what we need, never had to stop a runaway train yet!.I read some time ago the average size of UK Salmon caught was 14lb,probably smaller these days, a drag system that lets you control fish like that is all we need and yes you can use rim control techniques perfectly adequately all you like there.Its just where there's an awkward wade,or your waist deep struggling with a Gye net(see the net thread!) or its a dodgy place in general,a drag system will look after your fish for you, while at times you see to other issues.
Love my Marquis 3's,best large arbour reels going!,but love my Angels and ULDLA's better.
I'd pay for a good Hardy or similar-Lamson,Danielsson,maybe Loop etc.,but more than that,mmmm like to fish with them not just sit and look at them!
However each to their own, what makes the world go round n all that.Pedro.
 

MCXFisher

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I spent most of my salmon fly fishing career at the bargain end of the market, and as a Yorkshireman I have a keen sense of value for money. My first salmon fly reel was a Youngs (?) (were they bought out by Shakespeare?) inherited from my late father, which was fine insofar as it went, aged around 40-50 years. My grandfather's advice was to invest my money in the best line I could afford: the reel came third in the order of priorities. I then had a Vision Koma for many years, which gave excellent service, but I have no doubt that its longevity came from the time and effort I devoted to maintenance. The cheaper the reel, the more you have to work to keep it going. The exception to that rule was the Loop CLW (now the XAct), made from carbon composite and with a fully sealed brake system taken from the more expensive models. It even withstood being shut in a pick-up door with only a minor cosmetic chip (well, it was only an Isuzu after all). The CLW was, however, too light to balance most rods.

A bequest from an aunt allowed me to succumb to the temptation of an upmarket reel - a Lamson Guru - which is a lovely piece of design and manufacturing that balances a 13 foot rod perfectly. When the Koma started to die I bought a Loop Evotec at a bargain price (1/2 RRP): much heavier than the Lamson and a respectable balance on a 14 foot rod. But much of the weight in the Evotec was there for form not function, with inelegant redundant material all over the place. I sold it without regret a couple of years ago, together with its paired 14 foot rod. The Koma's actual successor is a Vision Rulla, which is about the cheapest fully machined reel on the market. It is simple, well made for the money and has a truly heroic line capacity. It balances my 13' 8" Cult perfectly, primarily because I replaced the original up-locking bling reel seat with a nice plain black down-locking ALPS, which shifted the C of G down by 3".

Having encountered the pleasures of the Guru I was easily persuaded by the virtues of a Danielsson, which is another beautifully designed and engineered reel. Form follows function throughout, and it's as strong as a Challenger without any excess of materials. Like the Guru its quality and function is a source of great pleasure, and I suspect that phrase explains a lot about people's preferences in reels. A good reel is a nice thing to use and own. But I suggest you can get all of that for around £250 without going way up into Bogdan territory. In the past 25 years I've purchased 7 salmon fly reels: one died; two sold; and 4 remain to see me out, all perfectly balanced with their partnered rod.

There's a huge span of opinion on the virtue of a good brake, and Castor's explanation of the influence of the US single-handed big game market was an excellent exposition. Like most people, whilst fighting a fish I set the brake at a level that prevents over-runs, and provide the variability with palm to the reel and finger and cork to line. There are, however, based on experience and age, occasions when a good brake is invaluable. First, when dealing with a big fish in heavy water that has a fixed determination to go downstream and can put a lot of distance between you and it in short order. Second, when pursuing such a fish or manoeuvring to get square in tricky terrain, when your spare hand is primarily engaged with movement. And third, once you get past the 30 minute point in a fight, you're glad of all the help you can muster. That's a lovely situation to enjoy - in retrospect :):):)
 

lowforcefly

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Do we need to go over this again ?

Hi Richard.

TBH...yes, for me anyway.

It's nothing to do with super duper train stopping drag for me, just plain old reliability.

Had too many other cheaper reels let me down as the drag wasn't up to much if it got wet. Almost lost a liced 15lber a few years back when the drag on a Grey's reel suddenly went into free spool. Played the fish on half a head before my mate got a chance to net it!!

Nowt wrong with the old Trion. I use it's cousin the President on my switch rod. Other than that it's my Evotec HD 9-13 on the 13' rod and the Megaloop on the 15' rod. Good reliable drag systems you can trust.

Just my tuppence worth.:)
I think some people should remember that when some of the reels such as the hardy marquis came out it was the cutting edge, not because of it's technology, but because of it's functionality, reliability, and you paid, a relative, hell of a lot for that then!

I used to look at them in the display case in the local tackle emporium, and lovely they were, but way out of my price bracket as an apprentice. So i had to make do with second, third, hand reels that had already been several times around several different blocks.
Why... because at the time, and still relevant today, I quickly realised that it wasn't economical, and was bloody frustrating, to buy the available cheap reels of the time knowing they would fail in short order, just when you had that big lump on the other end !
This is not so apparent in fly reels as the minimum spec. is quite low, when compared to reels for other types of fishing.
How many regular users of fixed spools have had bail springs, crown gears go, on the cheaper reels. What were the multipliers like before ABU Ambassador came out, apart from KP Morrit, you had to buy american.
Check out the sea fishing forums where they really scrutinise the quality, longevity, of available reels, due to the stick they give them.
The internet has allowed reliability issues to become common knowledge, and has forced makers to react, as it isn't localised incidents that they can just ignore because it didn't really impact sales.
At the end of the day reel choice is personal. as is rod, waders, and underpants !

You need to fix your requirements, measure that against what return you would wish for, and make your choice ?
For me it is a mix of capability to exceed my maximum need in operation, and functionality, and provide that reliably for as long as possible...and for that I am prepared to pay what I need, or can justifiably afford ! It is my money after all !:D

Instead of continuing arguments about pen**, sorry, reel envy/ embarrassment/ bragging rights ...would we not be better compiling a list, evaluating pros and cons, failures, successes...so people could be better informed when they make their personal choice based on their circumstances / priorities ?
Mel...
 

westie4566

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I think some people should remember that when some of the reels such as the hardy marquis came out it was the cutting edge, not because of it's technology, but because of it's functionality, reliability, and you paid, a relative, hell of a lot for that then!

I used to look at them in the display case in the local tackle emporium, and lovely they were, but way out of my price bracket as an apprentice. So i had to make do with second, third, hand reels that had already been several times around several different blocks.
Why... because at the time, and still relevant today, I quickly realised that it wasn't economical, and was bloody frustrating, to buy the available cheap reels of the time knowing they would fail in short order, just when you had that big lump on the other end !
This is not so apparent in fly reels as the minimum spec. is quite low, when compared to reels for other types of fishing.
How many regular users of fixed spools have had bail springs, crown gears go, on the cheaper reels. What were the multipliers like before ABU Ambassador came out, apart from KP Morrit, you had to buy american.
Check out the sea fishing forums where they really scrutinise the quality, longevity, of available reels, due to the stick they give them.
The internet has allowed reliability issues to become common knowledge, and has forced makers to react, as it isn't localised incidents that they can just ignore because it didn't really impact sales.
At the end of the day reel choice is personal. as is rod, waders, and underpants !

You need to fix your requirements, measure that against what return you would wish for, and make your choice ?
For me it is a mix of capability to exceed my maximum need in operation, and functionality, and provide that reliably for as long as possible...and for that I am prepared to pay what I need, or can justifiably afford ! It is my money after all !:D

Instead of continuing arguments about pen**, sorry, reel envy/ embarrassment/ bragging rights ...would we not be better compiling a list, evaluating pros and cons, failures, successes...so people could be better informed when they make their personal choice based on their circumstances / priorities ?
Mel...
Dunno why you felt you had to single me out for criticism????:rolleyes: Pretty unnecessary in the scheme of things and you could still have made your post.

Anyhoo, if it makes you feel any better. All three reels I mentioned were bought s/h from memebers on here. The total cost of all three came in at considerably less than buying the Megaloop new. So, sorry to have to burst your 'bragging rights' bubble, lol.:p I'm from Aberdeen and tight as the proverbial duck's behind.:D

They were pieces of kit that I wanted as they were nicely made, reliable and of a decent weight to balance my rods. I'm very much with MCX on this one.

As it happens, my early fishing was all done with JW Youngs/variations there of. Absolutely nowt wrong with them and I regret selling them to go 'modern':rolleyes: I was quite chuffed recently find that I still had one (Diawa 812) lurking in a box that must have been there for 25-30 years and totally forgotten about.

I understand your point about sea gear as I cod fish during the winter and use Penn 525's. When you look at a) complexity and b) build quality over that of salmon reels and then compare price it just doesn't stack up. My annual maintainence of these is to lube the bearings pre season and give them a rinse under the cold tap at the end. :eek::eek::D
 

Loxie

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I think the first major change in UK fly reels was the System 2. I changed my Hardy Marquis’s for S2’s in about 1993 and still use some of them today, and they still work just fine. The larger arbor reels were the next step.
 

hairyscotsman

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I think some people should remember that when some of the reels such as the hardy marquis came out it was the cutting edge, not because of it's technology, but because of it's functionality, reliability, and you paid, a relative, hell of a lot for that then!

I used to look at them in the display case in the local tackle emporium, and lovely they were, but way out of my price bracket as an apprentice. So i had to make do with second, third, hand reels that had already been several times around several different blocks.
Why... because at the time, and still relevant today, I quickly realised that it wasn't economical, and was bloody frustrating, to buy the available cheap reels of the time knowing they would fail in short order, just when you had that big lump on the other end !
This is not so apparent in fly reels as the minimum spec. is quite low, when compared to reels for other types of fishing.
How many regular users of fixed spools have had bail springs, crown gears go, on the cheaper reels. What were the multipliers like before ABU Ambassador came out, apart from KP Morrit, you had to buy american.
Check out the sea fishing forums where they really scrutinise the quality, longevity, of available reels, due to the stick they give them.
The internet has allowed reliability issues to become common knowledge, and has forced makers to react, as it isn't localised incidents that they can just ignore because it didn't really impact sales.
At the end of the day reel choice is personal. as is rod, waders, and underpants !

You need to fix your requirements, measure that against what return you would wish for, and make your choice ?
For me it is a mix of capability to exceed my maximum need in operation, and functionality, and provide that reliably for as long as possible...and for that I am prepared to pay what I need, or can justifiably afford ! It is my money after all !:D

Instead of continuing arguments about pen**, sorry, reel envy/ embarrassment/ bragging rights ...would we not be better compiling a list, evaluating pros and cons, failures, successes...so people could be better informed when they make their personal choice based on their circumstances / priorities ?
Mel...


I am not too sure why you feel this thread was about reel envy/bragging rights etc:confused:...I simply asked if we require the drag that modern reels use and as such are we just paying mainly for the aesthetics( which is fine if thats what you want to do)..I was wanting the pros and cons and feel those that have contributed have helped me make up my mind....:)
Sticking with a decent cheaper end reel and buying another rod !;);)
 
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