Salmon Film River Test

miramichi

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I'm fascinated by the question of whether or not someting similar to this technique might be an effective way to regularly get some salmon to take that don't appear to be otherwise catchable. You regularly see fish holding that you can wade near, that won't take a wet fly swung over them, and won't take a dry fly either. I have tried nymphs with strike indicators over these fish, but not a lot, and so far with no luck. But I'm to experiment with it more this year if we get the right conditions.
 

compagnito

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I wouldn't presume any expertise in this area, but is it possible people give up too soon.

I fished for some difficult trout (wild browns) this year, and, they knew I was there, and refused to take cast after cast, until finally, the presentation is just right, and, click, they've grabbed the nymph.
 

Deveron

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I wouldn't presume any expertise in this area, but is it possible people give up too soon.

I fished for some difficult trout (wild browns) this year, and, they knew I was there, and refused to take cast after cast, until finally, the presentation is just right, and, click, they've grabbed the nymph.
Not so when fishing the heavy nymph for Salmon. If the fish does not take after a few attempts, we would leave them alone and come back and try later.
 

Deveron

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I would say that over the years it was 50/50. If you could see the target fish you also saw the take. When fishing blind, and drawing the nymph up towards the surface the takes were savage pulls as the fish took and turned. Don't watch your line, look at the nymph, and always hold the nymph at the top of the water for a few seconds in case you have not seen any fish following.
 
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hutchy1379

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Nymphing for brown trout where I would strike provided the fish hadnt tightened the line itself, would you strike when the salmon atkes the nymph or is it like fishing with a salmon fly where you let the fish take line and dont strike?
Very interesting video and method. Looks like it would be really exciting to fish for salmon using nymphs
 

miramichi

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Loomisguide - the river is very wide in areas that I fish, and I will need to try and wade as close to the fish as possible. I don't think I can get close enough to use that high stick technique. Why don't you think a strike indicator will work?
 

Deveron

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When using the chalkstream method we are only using a short line, casting up stream of our target fish and lifting the rod up and away when the nymph is in front of the fish. Your indicator with this method would be out of the water (during the lift) and IMO it would not work on such a short line.

We would strike when we could see the fish close its mouth on the nymph. If taken blind the fish hook themselves.

I don't think it is a method you can use when wading.
 
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compagnito

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You'd be looking at a different technique Miramichi.

I think the Leisenring lift might be the way forward.

Maybe a dry with a nymph beneath it?
 

castor

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Having read this thread through I see that there is no advice given on the size or style of nymph used down there in 'ampshire! Any advice please.

We used to fish - in the daytime - a lowwater size 6 or 8 with no more than some wire (usually copper painted matt black when tied) forming a hump on the underside of the hook and fish that along the bottom on the Hampshire Beaulieu river for seatrout. Cast to the far side. There is such a slow current that you can then put your rod down and have a half cigarette before hand-drawing the line back at the slowest twitch possible with a WetCel11....boring until a seatrout takes hold and then all hell let loose. The best I have seen on this method was 14lbs + back in the 1960s that was on a well sunk silk line.
 

buncranabop

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I'm fascinated by the question of whether or not someting similar to this technique might be an effective way to regularly get some salmon to take that don't appear to be otherwise catchable. You regularly see fish holding that you can wade near, that won't take a wet fly swung over them, and won't take a dry fly either. I have tried nymphs with strike indicators over these fish, but not a lot, and so far with no luck. But I'm to experiment with it more this year if we get the right conditions.
We share similar thoughts miramichi and after a very succesful season fishing nymph style for summer steelhead in clear water I am quietly confident that this method will work equally well for atlantic salmon. I have yet to test it but hopes are high. As far as striking goes I would say definitely do it. Out of all my hook ups so far I would say there was only one fish that came towards my presentation, struck it hard and then turned away hooking himself. On all other occcasions from what I could see through the ripples the fish seemed to take the nymph as it drifted past. The line would tighten slightly and a good firm strike would have you in contact with a rocket at the end of the line. As I always fished alongside a buddy whom exclusively swung wet flies I think this is another method that will at least double an anglers chances when swinging flies just isnt cutting it.
 

sneakypeter

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I,ve just started to get to grips with this method, one of the key factors is not fly (nymph) type, but weight, they need to be very heavy, 2 or 3 ,5.5mm tungsten beads may seem excessive, but faced with 8ft+ of fast water, you need it.A hook with a couple of beads on it will catch fish, without any dressings, but are you brave enough to try it?
peter
 

compagnito

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From the above I think you will get an understanding that this method is for fishing in very specific circumstances.

The chalk stream salmon lie in deep fastish water, and, according to many, will not move far to take a fly.

Often their lies are artificially enhanced with groynes and timbered banking supports to create deep gravelly holding areas.

So, in more typical freestone rivers, you might need to experiment with indicators, Leisenring lifts and so forth.

If you don't need two tungsten swan shot sized beads there is no sense in trying to use them.

Hewitt I think covers fishing the nymph in american waters.
 

Deveron

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Hook sizes were 6 and 8, the pattern we used were specialist carp or barbel type. The original nymphs were tied as a GRHE with a tungsten slotted body and 6mm brass bead. The body and bead were purchased from the US. The Keepers from Testwood then started to have nymphs made with marabou tails. The 6mm bead is a must and can be purchased from Spirt River agents or direct from them in the US. As I said in another thread, we have caught fish with just one 6mm brass bead followed up with a 5mm tungsten, but when this was done the fish were very fresh and straight from the tide.
 

castor

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Thank you for the info on patterns used.

I havn't been to Testwood since Jack Terry was the keeper, and his father still lived in the island house: 50 years or more ago:rolleyes:. John Howlett of Wellworthy Engineering was the leaseholder and the Barker-Mill Estate the owners.
 
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