Salmon farmers warn against SNP-Green deal

clydesider

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Extract from todays Scotsman.

Mike

Salmon farmers warn against SNP-Green deal​

A coalition deal between the SNP and Scottish Greens would be “catastrophic” for Scotland's salmon farming industry it has been claimed, as talks between the parties on a co-operation agreement entered a new phase.​

By Gina Davidson
Friday, 2nd July 2021, 4:55 am

Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Negotiations which began in June, are believed to have progressed to conversations between individual government ministers and Green MSPs to discuss policies.
However the SNP is coming under increasing pressure from sectors of Scotland’s rural economy who claim that any agreement would be “devastating” for businesses.

Dozens of rural organisations, including gamekeepers and moorland groups, have already written to Nicola Sturgeon claiming an agreement with the Greens would “tear apart” rural jobs, and now salmon farmers have warned that Green party policies would be ruinous for their industry.

The Greens have pledged to phase out open net pen salmon farming, toughen conditions on licences to farm in coastal waters and stop any further growth of the sector until environmental and animal welfare concerns are discussed.

Read More
Whales in Scotland: Watch orcas spotted swimming off St Abb's Head near Eyemouth





Scottish Green co-leader Lorna Slater said on Thursday that rural businesses needed to be realistic and could not continue to run in a way that damages the planet – though she admitted to having never visited a salmon farm and did not know they were located on the west coast.
While it is not clear if the party’s aquaculture plans will be part of the negotiations with the SNP, the Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation has said talk of a deal was concerning its members, as Green manifesto plans “have the potential to prejudice the sector's future and thousands of jobs.”
The SSPO has also said the industry is a relatively low carbon form of protein production and farmers are working hard to reduce their environmental impact.
Meanwhile Anne Anderson of Scottish Sea Farms, said in a BBC interview, that the Greens’ desire to shut open pen farms would have “a catastrophic effect on the Scottish salmon farming.”




She added it would have a “devastating conclusion and impact on people.”
However Ms Slater said: “I don't want workers to worry. We want to put in place jobs guarantees, just transition plans, build up sustainable environmentally friendly industries, so that we know that people will not lose their livelihoods and their incomes.
"Business owners need to be realistic; they cannot continue to run businesses that damage the planet, that put in danger wildlife and habitats. We have to have a sustainable system.”
Ms Slater admitted she had not visited a salmon farm, and had thought they were located in Shetland and Orkney. In terms of the talks with the SNP she said: “We are coming into this with what's in our manifesto.




"So, at the moment we are absolutely supporting what's in our manifesto and we are not committing to any particular policy area, what we are going to do or not do. We want to get as much of our manifesto implemented as we possibly can.”
Hamish Macdonell, director of strategic engagement at the SSPO said he had issued an invitation to Ms Slater to come to a salmon farm, a processing plant a hatchery or any other facility in the sector.
He said: “We are eager and looking forward to hosting Ms Slater at one of our farms.”
The talks between the SNP and Greens were announced by Nicola Sturgeon in May, and the Greens are believed to be taking advice from their sister party in New Zealand who share power with Jacinda Ardern's Labour administration.




Ms Slater said the one area which would be a "problem” in talks is the “maximum extraction of oil and gas” but she added: “If any areas where we cannot find an agreement, where we cannot find a good cooperation, we would just leave those out of the cooperation agreement and we would continue to be opposition, a vocal and constructive opposition in those areas.”
Scottish Conservative rural affairs spokeswoman, Rachael Hamilton, said the Greens had “continually failed to stand up for Scotland’s rural economy” and that “vital jobs and livelihoods in these communities are at serious threat if they are given a seat round the Scottish Government table.”
She added: “Salmon farmers are the latest in a long line of sectors queuing up to voice their concerns about the Greens being at the heart of the Scottish Government. It is little wonder our rural industries are so worried by that prospect.
“We already know the Greens want to kill off Scotland’s oil and gas sector, but their plans would be a disaster for the whole of our economy.




"Putting the Greens anywhere near government would be devastating for rural communities and their livelihoods right across Scotland. The SNP needs to stop prioritising their nationalist campaign, do what is right for Scotland's economic recovery and rule out any agreement with the Greens."
A spokesman for Scottish Green MSPs said environmental harm and fish welfare was a higher priority for the party than phasing out caged fish farms altogether, and the party's intention was to support industries in finding alternatives to harmful and polluting activities, and not to force sudden change.
Previously land and river management groups representing more than 90,000 jobs said their livelihoods were in jeopardy if the SNP takes on Green party manifesto pledges in any agreement.
The SNP has said it will not give a running commentary on the talks with the Scottish Greens.




The government has said its investment in tourism and the rural economy has increased to £1.12bn, including £613m in ongoing support for farmers and crofters.
“We are supporting economic activity in rural and island areas which supports thousands of jobs and livelihoods. That includes aquaculture, which generates millions for the Scottish economy – and support for businesses in the wider seafood supply chain, which we helped through a £7.75 million package earlier this year in response to the issues they faced following Brexit and Covid-19.
“We must tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss, and there will be opportunities in all of this for rural industries and workers to secure green, clean and new jobs.
"That is why delivering a just transition is a central part of our journey to net zero and becoming a climate resilient nation. Rural communities will be at the forefront of this and we will work with all partners and sectors to support them to benefit from the activity we plan as part of our green recovery.”



Lorna SlaterScottish GreensSNPScotland
 

goosander

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Extract from todays Scotsman.

Mike

Salmon farmers warn against SNP-Green deal​

A coalition deal between the SNP and Scottish Greens would be “catastrophic” for Scotland's salmon farming industry it has been claimed, as talks between the parties on a co-operation agreement entered a new phase.​

By Gina Davidson
Friday, 2nd July 2021, 4:55 am

Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Negotiations which began in June, are believed to have progressed to conversations between individual government ministers and Green MSPs to discuss policies.
However the SNP is coming under increasing pressure from sectors of Scotland’s rural economy who claim that any agreement would be “devastating” for businesses.

Dozens of rural organisations, including gamekeepers and moorland groups, have already written to Nicola Sturgeon claiming an agreement with the Greens would “tear apart” rural jobs, and now salmon farmers have warned that Green party policies would be ruinous for their industry.

The Greens have pledged to phase out open net pen salmon farming, toughen conditions on licences to farm in coastal waters and stop any further growth of the sector until environmental and animal welfare concerns are discussed.

Read More
Whales in Scotland: Watch orcas spotted swimming off St Abb's Head near Eyemouth





Scottish Green co-leader Lorna Slater said on Thursday that rural businesses needed to be realistic and could not continue to run in a way that damages the planet – though she admitted to having never visited a salmon farm and did not know they were located on the west coast.
While it is not clear if the party’s aquaculture plans will be part of the negotiations with the SNP, the Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation has said talk of a deal was concerning its members, as Green manifesto plans “have the potential to prejudice the sector's future and thousands of jobs.”
The SSPO has also said the industry is a relatively low carbon form of protein production and farmers are working hard to reduce their environmental impact.
Meanwhile Anne Anderson of Scottish Sea Farms, said in a BBC interview, that the Greens’ desire to shut open pen farms would have “a catastrophic effect on the Scottish salmon farming.”




She added it would have a “devastating conclusion and impact on people.”
However Ms Slater said: “I don't want workers to worry. We want to put in place jobs guarantees, just transition plans, build up sustainable environmentally friendly industries, so that we know that people will not lose their livelihoods and their incomes.
"Business owners need to be realistic; they cannot continue to run businesses that damage the planet, that put in danger wildlife and habitats. We have to have a sustainable system.”
Ms Slater admitted she had not visited a salmon farm, and had thought they were located in Shetland and Orkney. In terms of the talks with the SNP she said: “We are coming into this with what's in our manifesto.




"So, at the moment we are absolutely supporting what's in our manifesto and we are not committing to any particular policy area, what we are going to do or not do. We want to get as much of our manifesto implemented as we possibly can.”
Hamish Macdonell, director of strategic engagement at the SSPO said he had issued an invitation to Ms Slater to come to a salmon farm, a processing plant a hatchery or any other facility in the sector.
He said: “We are eager and looking forward to hosting Ms Slater at one of our farms.”
The talks between the SNP and Greens were announced by Nicola Sturgeon in May, and the Greens are believed to be taking advice from their sister party in New Zealand who share power with Jacinda Ardern's Labour administration.




Ms Slater said the one area which would be a "problem” in talks is the “maximum extraction of oil and gas” but she added: “If any areas where we cannot find an agreement, where we cannot find a good cooperation, we would just leave those out of the cooperation agreement and we would continue to be opposition, a vocal and constructive opposition in those areas.”
Scottish Conservative rural affairs spokeswoman, Rachael Hamilton, said the Greens had “continually failed to stand up for Scotland’s rural economy” and that “vital jobs and livelihoods in these communities are at serious threat if they are given a seat round the Scottish Government table.”
She added: “Salmon farmers are the latest in a long line of sectors queuing up to voice their concerns about the Greens being at the heart of the Scottish Government. It is little wonder our rural industries are so worried by that prospect.
“We already know the Greens want to kill off Scotland’s oil and gas sector, but their plans would be a disaster for the whole of our economy.




"Putting the Greens anywhere near government would be devastating for rural communities and their livelihoods right across Scotland. The SNP needs to stop prioritising their nationalist campaign, do what is right for Scotland's economic recovery and rule out any agreement with the Greens."
A spokesman for Scottish Green MSPs said environmental harm and fish welfare was a higher priority for the party than phasing out caged fish farms altogether, and the party's intention was to support industries in finding alternatives to harmful and polluting activities, and not to force sudden change.
Previously land and river management groups representing more than 90,000 jobs said their livelihoods were in jeopardy if the SNP takes on Green party manifesto pledges in any agreement.
The SNP has said it will not give a running commentary on the talks with the Scottish Greens.




The government has said its investment in tourism and the rural economy has increased to £1.12bn, including £613m in ongoing support for farmers and crofters.
“We are supporting economic activity in rural and island areas which supports thousands of jobs and livelihoods. That includes aquaculture, which generates millions for the Scottish economy – and support for businesses in the wider seafood supply chain, which we helped through a £7.75 million package earlier this year in response to the issues they faced following Brexit and Covid-19.
“We must tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss, and there will be opportunities in all of this for rural industries and workers to secure green, clean and new jobs.
"That is why delivering a just transition is a central part of our journey to net zero and becoming a climate resilient nation. Rural communities will be at the forefront of this and we will work with all partners and sectors to support them to benefit from the activity we plan as part of our green recovery.”



Lorna SlaterScottish GreensSNPScotland
Any party that wants to turn the clock back to the days before cars and use bikes is kidding its self and everyone else on. A disgrace that people making decisions about peoples life's does not even know what salmon farms are.
What has happened to our country with all these idiots running it. No one allowed into politics until 40 years old and trusted.
Doing away with oil might sound good to some but were are all the stuff for making nylon / machinery / lubrication and other things. Oil products are used in /food / toothpaste / clothes and most things in life.
Bob.
Bob.
 
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Jonsey

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I think it stated that she hadn’t visited a farm. Neither have I, but I’ve seen them from the shore, seen discarded salmon carcasses along the shore line, seen the lice infested salmon and sea trout on Scotland’s west coast and further afield, caused purely by the massive concentration of salmon farms. I don’t think anyone is suggesting that we turn back the clock (although I wish it were possible), rather than learn to live more sustainably with the world around us, surely that’s no bad thing?
 

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While I would love to see the end of open cage salmon farms, with the industry moving on to a close contained land based system. I find the prospect of the Green Party having any major influence on government policy, exceeding worrying. Was it not Lorna Slater that stated, that they (the Greens), wanted to make it illegal to sell any house that was not up to their desired eco standard and the less said about bikes the better.
 

reelit1

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The Greens jumping on the Band wagon for their own ends, highly disagreeable, why anybody would vote for the Green Party defeats me, they want the Highlands emptied of local people and any employment for them. It is only a ploy to make them look good, they should have no position at all to negotiate anything.
 

keirross

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Folks should get a grip on what so-called 'green' actually constitutes.

There's a paper so far unwritten it will not be wrote. There literally is not one single scientific publication worthy of the premise.

It's cool tho to have ppm touted around as if imminently existential when in actual fact global CO2 concs have varied seven-fold just within the last. billion years, attended by global coolings and warmings. Just about some sixty years ago we'd no real idea about isostasy or the shape of the atmosphere. Just like flood periodicity across millenia.
 

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Extract from todays Scotsman.

Mike

Salmon farmers warn against SNP-Green deal​

A coalition deal between the SNP and Scottish Greens would be “catastrophic” for Scotland's salmon farming industry it has been claimed, as talks between the parties on a co-operation agreement entered a new phase.​

By Gina Davidson
Friday, 2nd July 2021, 4:55 am

Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Salmon farming on Loch Duart.
Negotiations which began in June, are believed to have progressed to conversations between individual government ministers and Green MSPs to discuss policies.
However the SNP is coming under increasing pressure from sectors of Scotland’s rural economy who claim that any agreement would be “devastating” for businesses.

Dozens of rural organisations, including gamekeepers and moorland groups, have already written to Nicola Sturgeon claiming an agreement with the Greens would “tear apart” rural jobs, and now salmon farmers have warned that Green party policies would be ruinous for their industry.

The Greens have pledged to phase out open net pen salmon farming, toughen conditions on licences to farm in coastal waters and stop any further growth of the sector until environmental and animal welfare concerns are discussed.

Read More
Whales in Scotland: Watch orcas spotted swimming off St Abb's Head near Eyemouth





Scottish Green co-leader Lorna Slater said on Thursday that rural businesses needed to be realistic and could not continue to run in a way that damages the planet – though she admitted to having never visited a salmon farm and did not know they were located on the west coast.
While it is not clear if the party’s aquaculture plans will be part of the negotiations with the SNP, the Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation has said talk of a deal was concerning its members, as Green manifesto plans “have the potential to prejudice the sector's future and thousands of jobs.”
The SSPO has also said the industry is a relatively low carbon form of protein production and farmers are working hard to reduce their environmental impact.
Meanwhile Anne Anderson of Scottish Sea Farms, said in a BBC interview, that the Greens’ desire to shut open pen farms would have “a catastrophic effect on the Scottish salmon farming.”




She added it would have a “devastating conclusion and impact on people.”
However Ms Slater said: “I don't want workers to worry. We want to put in place jobs guarantees, just transition plans, build up sustainable environmentally friendly industries, so that we know that people will not lose their livelihoods and their incomes.
"Business owners need to be realistic; they cannot continue to run businesses that damage the planet, that put in danger wildlife and habitats. We have to have a sustainable system.”
Ms Slater admitted she had not visited a salmon farm, and had thought they were located in Shetland and Orkney. In terms of the talks with the SNP she said: “We are coming into this with what's in our manifesto.




"So, at the moment we are absolutely supporting what's in our manifesto and we are not committing to any particular policy area, what we are going to do or not do. We want to get as much of our manifesto implemented as we possibly can.”
Hamish Macdonell, director of strategic engagement at the SSPO said he had issued an invitation to Ms Slater to come to a salmon farm, a processing plant a hatchery or any other facility in the sector.
He said: “We are eager and looking forward to hosting Ms Slater at one of our farms.”
The talks between the SNP and Greens were announced by Nicola Sturgeon in May, and the Greens are believed to be taking advice from their sister party in New Zealand who share power with Jacinda Ardern's Labour administration.




Ms Slater said the one area which would be a "problem” in talks is the “maximum extraction of oil and gas” but she added: “If any areas where we cannot find an agreement, where we cannot find a good cooperation, we would just leave those out of the cooperation agreement and we would continue to be opposition, a vocal and constructive opposition in those areas.”
Scottish Conservative rural affairs spokeswoman, Rachael Hamilton, said the Greens had “continually failed to stand up for Scotland’s rural economy” and that “vital jobs and livelihoods in these communities are at serious threat if they are given a seat round the Scottish Government table.”
She added: “Salmon farmers are the latest in a long line of sectors queuing up to voice their concerns about the Greens being at the heart of the Scottish Government. It is little wonder our rural industries are so worried by that prospect.
“We already know the Greens want to kill off Scotland’s oil and gas sector, but their plans would be a disaster for the whole of our economy.




"Putting the Greens anywhere near government would be devastating for rural communities and their livelihoods right across Scotland. The SNP needs to stop prioritising their nationalist campaign, do what is right for Scotland's economic recovery and rule out any agreement with the Greens."
A spokesman for Scottish Green MSPs said environmental harm and fish welfare was a higher priority for the party than phasing out caged fish farms altogether, and the party's intention was to support industries in finding alternatives to harmful and polluting activities, and not to force sudden change.
Previously land and river management groups representing more than 90,000 jobs said their livelihoods were in jeopardy if the SNP takes on Green party manifesto pledges in any agreement.
The SNP has said it will not give a running commentary on the talks with the Scottish Greens.




The government has said its investment in tourism and the rural economy has increased to £1.12bn, including £613m in ongoing support for farmers and crofters.
“We are supporting economic activity in rural and island areas which supports thousands of jobs and livelihoods. That includes aquaculture, which generates millions for the Scottish economy – and support for businesses in the wider seafood supply chain, which we helped through a £7.75 million package earlier this year in response to the issues they faced following Brexit and Covid-19.
“We must tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss, and there will be opportunities in all of this for rural industries and workers to secure green, clean and new jobs.
"That is why delivering a just transition is a central part of our journey to net zero and becoming a climate resilient nation. Rural communities will be at the forefront of this and we will work with all partners and sectors to support them to benefit from the activity we plan as part of our green recovery.”



Lorna SlaterScottish GreensSNPScotland
The sale of farmed salmon is worth millions to the Scottish economy but we are losing the wild salmon and the fishing for them which losing us millions to our economy when you consider hotels and boarding houses catering for the fishermen the costs for fishing permits. All salmon farms should be land based causing no pollution to the environment as the waste from the fish can be used for fertiliser. There is absolutely no pollution from wild salmon or those who fish for them and we would be saving the species from extinction
 

Fruin

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So, I am getting the impression that some on here, even when the Green Party want to implement policy that suits you, will still reject the party - very strange!
People on this forum slate the SNP for doing nothing about tackling the issues around salmon farming (although arguably they have done more than other parties ie. more than zero), but, when the Greens hint at doing all the things with the salmon farming industry that we cry out for, some of our members slate them as well.
It's a strange world indeed!
 

Sunset_angler

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So, I am getting the impression that some on here, even when the Green Party want to implement policy that suits you, will still reject the party - very strange!
People on this forum slate the SNP for doing nothing about tackling the issues around salmon farming (although arguably they have done more than other parties ie. more than zero), but, when the Greens hint at doing all the things with the salmon farming industry that we cry out for, some of our members slate them as well.
It's a strange world indeed!
Could you please explain to me what exactly Nicola and her party has done that is more tha zero, 1% maybe, spouted more absolute tosh and sideswiped the issue at every opportunity, and as for the greens well I am sure a few of their policies will fade away over time.
 
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Loxie

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So, I am getting the impression that some on here, even when the Green Party want to implement policy that suits you, will still reject the party - very strange!
People on this forum slate the SNP for doing nothing about tackling the issues around salmon farming (although arguably they have done more than other parties ie. more than zero), but, when the Greens hint at doing all the things with the salmon farming industry that we cry out for, some of our members slate them as well.
It's a strange world indeed!
The dangers of political parties! Greens want to ban fieldsports so I would never support them even when I have sympathy for some of their other policies. Perhaps others posting on a fieldsports forum feel the same?
 

Fruin

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Don't get me wrong, I don't hide from the fact that I support the SNP, but, only because without them there is no chance of Scotland becoming a normal independent nation.
I do not support the Green party. I support their overall agenda/ideology in some ways but, find it hard to see how it can be implemented in full in a modern world.
It irks me no end that the SNP support the aquaculture industry in its present format and I have written to them numerous times about the issues involved.
My point was that it is a moot point attacking any one party on the salmon farming issue, because they have all supported it. I do recognise that the SNP must be attacked on it presently, as they are in power.
 

K MacC

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With the expansion of another 3 salmon or rainbow trout open pen systems announced in the Clyde estuary lately. We need a hault on all expansion and a swift move to land based aquaculture. Whether this is achieveable with the Greens and SNP alliance is unknown, but it will definitely not be doable with the Tories or Labour government in power. The greens need to be seen as a credible option, therefore they should be lobbied to move open pen systems to land based systems.
Whether you like them or not they could be critical in the move towards a cleaner less damaging aquaculture industry!
 

Lamson v10

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So, I am getting the impression that some on here, even when the Green Party want to implement policy that suits you, will still reject the party - very strange!
People on this forum slate the SNP for doing nothing about tackling the issues around salmon farming (although arguably they have done more than other parties ie. more than zero), but, when the Greens hint at doing all the things with the salmon farming industry that we cry out for, some of our members slate them as well.
It's a strange world indeed!

The greens leader Lorna slater didn't even know salmon farms were in the friggin sea 😂😂😂 what chance have we got. Lunies in charge of the asylum 🤯. So what have the snp done to protect and benefit all the rivers on the west coast , apart from Grant more licenses for more farms causing more devistation
 
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Fruin

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The greens leader Lorna slater didn't even know salmon farms were in the friggin sea 😂😂😂 what chance have we got. Lunies in charge of the asylum 🤯. So what have the snp done to protect and benefit all the rivers on the west coast , apart from Grant more licenses for more farms causing more devistation
They did bring a closure to mixed stock netting meaning that those with netting rights could no longer net outwith inland waters.
They also carried out the reviews on salmon farming, at least politicising it and bringing it to the fore. I agree whole heartedly that they do not do enough about the issue and I am sure most of us would rather that laws were brought in to ensure closed containment. However, it is plainly wrong to assume that any other political party would do more, as history shows us that other parties actually done nothing. I still don't see any other party shouting about it... well, apart from the Greens but then you slate them for it :unsure:
 

keirstream

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Remember it may be better to look closer to home on Aquaculture farm siting issues.
Local Authorities approve or reject planning permissions.
However, most of them are run by the S.N.P. so is there any real chance of salvation for wild salmon populations on the West coast?
 

morphfly

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That will be disastrous for the Clyde and Lomond systems!
Too true. One salmon farm can affect for up to 20 miles in any direction. Any salmon smolts descending the rivers feeding into the sea lochs will be vulnerable
Morphfly
 

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Just out of interest where does all the waste from Glasgow go. Not sure I would want to eat any thing coming from the salt water close to the Clyde, when one considers that most of the coast line around the uk is unfit to swim in.
 

keirross

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The Greens jumping on the Band wagon for their own ends, highly disagreeable, why anybody would vote for the Green Party defeats
Remember it may be better to look closer to home on Aquaculture farm siting issues.
Local Authorities approve or reject planning permissions.
However, most of them are run by the S.N.P. so is there any real chance of salvation for wild salmon populations on the West coast?

me, they want the Highlands emptied of local people and any employment for them. It is only a ploy to make them look good, they should have no position at all to negotiate anything.
K , I remember well former fishery board that coudn't produce their accounts - despite having two 'legal fish' lawyers. What was interesting too was why our appointed FDSFB directors was then... innocent
 

luney

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So, I am getting the impression that some on here, even when the Green Party want to implement policy that suits you, will still reject the party - very strange!
People on this forum slate the SNP for doing nothing about tackling the issues around salmon farming (although arguably they have done more than other parties ie. more than zero), but, when the Greens hint at doing all the things with the salmon farming industry that we cry out for, some of our members slate them as well.
It's a strange world indeed!
I think the issue here is the greens stance on field sports Fuin but I think you probably knew that? As had been well documented before salmon fishing and field sports go hand in hand. I finished with the rods at the end of October and then picked up the gun. There are many shades of green it depends on how deep or light you like it.
Paul
 

luney

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They did bring a closure to mixed stock netting meaning that those with netting rights could no longer net outwith inland waters.
They also carried out the reviews on salmon farming, at least politicising it and bringing it to the fore. I agree whole heartedly that they do not do enough about the issue and I am sure most of us would rather that laws were brought in to ensure closed containment. However, it is plainly wrong to assume that any other political party would do more, as history shows us that other parties actually done nothing. I still don't see any other party shouting about it... well, apart from the Greens but then you slate them for it :unsure:
Money money money
NO political party is going to seriously tackle the aqua industry its political suicide. It would not surprise me that the majority of politicians on all sides are privately against it. But who's going to put their head above the parapet the instant reaction from the opposition would be your destroying rural jobs and of course the biggy the value to the economy. They are all informed sorry Lorna almost all, but where is the public support apart from a load of crusty old fishermen.😂 the revenue the industry brings in at the minute far out weighs peoples concerns for the hidden environment. Until that changes it will remain the status quo.
 
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