Sage X 8140

Neil W

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Before all this Covid19 stuff came into place I managed to get hold of a second hand sage X 14ft 8wt. I bought this with the intention of using as a summer 8wt for medium to large river summer fishing. I liked the idea of a 14ft rod for a light line. I have the X 14ft 9 wt and it’s an excellent rod so getting the lighter version seemed like a good idea. Unfortunately have not yet been able to try the rod. So naturally I have been looking on line for line recommendations in preparation for future trips. The strange thing is that I have seen reviews recommending scandi lines of at least 600gr. Now I like to load a rod and the 9wt sage X is excellent with a Rio 580 or the Gaelforce 600. Great rod. But a 600gr is a 10wt
so when I see reviews suggesting the 8 wt 14ft rod takes a 600 gr scandi I am confused especially as the 9wt version of the same rod takes the same line.
I know sage rods tend to be able to cast the rated line but also one line up. An 8wt sage often casts a 9wt depending how you like to load the rod.
I would love to know if anyone has this rod and what lines they like to use so can base my initial tests On this feedback
 

pfeul

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Sorry I don't have this rod, but usually sage rods are well rated for the number printed on the blank.
A sage 8wt is usually a 8/9 rod by european standards.
On the rio website (which is always a good starting for US rods), a 480 or 520 grain scandi head is recommended. I don't know if that helps. https://www.rioproducts.com/learn/spey-line-specs

Does the recommandation of a 600 grain head comes from the other side of the pond? Having read several US forum when I was looking information for my former TCX 7126 , I observed that many US casters, surely having learnt casting with skagit lines, recommend heavy scandi lines. Many or them recommended between 520 and 580 grains as being essential to load the rod, whereas after several attempts, the sweet spot to me was between 400 and 480 grains (440 was the best to me).
 

Neil W

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I think you make a very good point as the recommendations were in the US although one is a sage ambassador. It’s probably their love of skagit casting which makes them like an over loaded rod. I hadn’t considered that so thank you. The ‘wiggle’ test certainly feels like a lighter rod than 600gr. I am hoping the Rio outbound scandi 8/9 is a good match at 520gr. I agree with you that all my previous sage rods are pretty well rated it was just the reviews on this rod seemed to be extreme
 

Neil W

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Neil

What line do you put on your 14ft 9 weight
The best line I have used on it was the Rio Scandi 580gr 37.7ft line. It’s a 9/10 rating. The gaelforce 600gr was also good. I have also used a 630gr airflo skagit compact which was good but next time I would use the 660.
I had a week on the Spey with the Rio Scandi and I have never cast as well or enjoyed casting as much on any rod.
 

Hardyreels

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I guess no one has this rod
I do I do!


I've had the rod since they were the new thing and these are the lines I have. Scandi is a 44 foot head with integrated runner weighing 550 grains. The Skagit head is 33 foot with same welded runner and weighs 530 I believe. If and when I need the Skagit I use an 11 foot sink tip made from Z-12 which adds another 132 grains of weight. I also am able to cast a ten foot Z-15 weighing 150 grain which gives a total hear & tip weight of 680 grains.

I prefer Scandi with my mini head system but when waters are high I do use the Skagit. Use requires some change ups in technique but the rod will throw the load out well.

If I want to change to a Mid Spey line I have a 565 grain 55 foot head that works well also but I have only 2 spools and no longer use the 55 line.
 

Neil W

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I do I do!


I've had the rod since they were the new thing and these are the lines I have. Scandi is a 44 foot head with integrated runner weighing 550 grains. The Skagit head is 33 foot with same welded runner and weighs 530 I believe. If and when I need the Skagit I use an 11 foot sink tip made from Z-12 which adds another 132 grains of weight. I also am able to cast a ten foot Z-15 weighing 150 grain which gives a total hear & tip weight of 680 grains.

I prefer Scandi with my mini head system but when waters are high I do use the Skagit. Use requires some change ups in technique but the rod will throw the load out well.

If I want to change to a Mid Spey line I have a 565 grain 55 foot head that works well also but I have only 2 spools and no longer use the 55 line.
Thanks Ard that’s useful information. Interesting that you use a heavier scandi than skagit. I will probably star with a line around the 510 weight and move up to 540 as the next option. Do you still like the rod as compared to the sage one?
 

Hardyreels

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Yes I prefer the X over the One Neil. The line weights seem to work opposite as we would imagine, the longer the head the greater area over which the weight is distributed. With a short head like a Skagit, by the time we have rotated the rod up and over the shoulder to form the D loop a great deal of the lines weight is dangling between the rod tip and the anchor point. Because of that a Skagit in many instances will be somewhat lighter than a longer head due to weight distribution.

Make sense?

Best example I can offer would be my 15 foot Winston Derek Brown Special 7/8 rod. This rod casts beautifully using a 44 foot Scandi line weighing 600 grains. The rod will preform equally well with a 700 grain Partridge Ian Gordon 70 foot long Spey line. If I were to try a Skagit I suspect a 550 would be fine but I'd think that silly using a short head on the long rod.........
 

Neil W

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Yes I prefer the X over the One Neil. The line weights seem to work opposite as we would imagine, the longer the head the greater area over which the weight is distributed. With a short head like a Skagit, by the time we have rotated the rod up and over the shoulder to form the D loop a great deal of the lines weight is dangling between the rod tip and the anchor point. Because of that a Skagit in many instances will be somewhat lighter than a longer head due to weight distribution.

Make sense?

Best example I can offer would be my 15 foot Winston Derek Brown Special 7/8 rod. This rod casts beautifully using a 44 foot Scandi line weighing 600 grains. The rod will preform equally well with a 700 grain Partridge Ian Gordon 70 foot long Spey line. If I were to try a Skagit I suspect a 550 would be fine but I'd think that silly using a short head on the long rod.........
Yes that makes sense. My scandi lines are usually below 40ft so I tend to have more weight with the skagits. Looking forward to trying it if I can get to Scotland in September. Thanks again for your advice!
 
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