River wear 2021

Lgraydonflyfishing

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Judging by the amount of Sea Trout showing on the Southern rivers now, much earlier than normal, if I was up there I'd be having a go now.
Suspect that the lack of commercial fishing due to lockdown is having a beneficial effect.
What rivers are these mate? Is there plenty about
 

Chester

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The Tweed system has early running sea trout. Fish off the Till are not unusual in April but they don't seem to have shown up yet. Low water and winter temperatures won’t help.
Hopefully we’ll see fish with a rise in temps and a lift in the river
 

Lynnzer

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I had sessions at both the Sands and at Shinwell today. Very sunny and not much breeze.
I took a 5 weight trout rod and a 7' spinning rod.
Once more the river seemed devoid of life. In calm stretches the bottom was clearly seen, There were no fry apparent and certainly no larger fish movement,
There was a hatch on with plenty flies landing on the water but absolutely no interest from any fish.
Just saying like.
Is it possible that the very large spate last month swept fish away to the extent that they are now apparently absent? Could it be that the trout haven't returned from wherever they spawned? Do they also move up river to spawn like the salmon and sea trout, and haven't yet moved back to their original haunts? Has the very cold month had some affect on them?
Apart from the lack of life it was a pleasant day to be at the riverside anyway.
 

Auldghillie

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I had sessions at both the Sands and at Shinwell today. Very sunny and not much breeze.
I took a 5 weight trout rod and a 7' spinning rod.
Once more the river seemed devoid of life. In calm stretches the bottom was clearly seen, There were no fry apparent and certainly no larger fish movement,
There was a hatch on with plenty flies landing on the water but absolutely no interest from any fish.
Just saying like.
Is it possible that the very large spate last month swept fish away to the extent that they are now apparently absent? Could it be that the trout haven't returned from wherever they spawned? Do they also move up river to spawn like the salmon and sea trout, and haven't yet moved back to their original haunts? Has the very cold month had some affect on them?
Apart from the lack of life it was a pleasant day to be at the riverside anyway.
Trout need smaller gravel than migratory fish in general so they’ll migrate to wherever that is: up and down river. Don’t know your river but tributaries are more likely for river trout spawning but small gravel can also be found at the sides of bigger rivers obviously in a river with gravel substrate.

I doubt if trout are still in the burns since they spawn early. More likely lack of stocks for all the modern reasons. Good wild trout streams are hard to find. I only know one in Scotland and I’ve been around. AG
 
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Walleye

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I haven't been out on the river fishing for a couple of weeks. Low water, cold nights, bright sunshine all day don't seem to be the best conditions for early salmon fishing.
Has anyone heard of any caught the last few weeks?
 

Auldghillie

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I haven't been out on the river fishing for a couple of weeks. Low water, cold nights, bright sunshine all day don't seem to be the best conditions for early salmon fishing.
Has anyone heard of any caught the last few weeks?
That seems to hit the nail on the head. AG
 

Lgraydonflyfishing

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I haven't been out on the river fishing for a couple of weeks. Low water, cold nights, bright sunshine all day don't seem to be the best conditions for early salmon fishing.
Has anyone heard of any caught the last few weeks?
Heard of nothing Walleye, good lift should do the trick, soon be time for the seatrout 👍🎣
 

Andrew B

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I had sessions at both the Sands and at Shinwell today. Very sunny and not much breeze.
I took a 5 weight trout rod and a 7' spinning rod.
Once more the river seemed devoid of life. In calm stretches the bottom was clearly seen, There were no fry apparent and certainly no larger fish movement,
There was a hatch on with plenty flies landing on the water but absolutely no interest from any fish.
Just saying like.
Is it possible that the very large spate last month swept fish away to the extent that they are now apparently absent? Could it be that the trout haven't returned from wherever they spawned? Do they also move up river to spawn like the salmon and sea trout, and haven't yet moved back to their original haunts? Has the very cold month had some affect on them?
Apart from the lack of life it was a pleasant day to be at the riverside anyway.
All valid questions and I wouldn’t discount a lot of what you said about migration ect but in my experience on northern freestone rivers it can take a long time before the fish come out of the winter slumber? Personally I think the fish just hide away.
 

Andrew B

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I think you need to read my post again as that is not what I state. It may also help you to read up on Greenland glaciation at today’s date. There is a time interval when the sea becomes ice free in summer but rivers are just freezing-cold torrents of ice melt and sediment in which it is impossible for eggs to survive even if fish like char could wander in from elsewhere. This appears why there is only one salmon river in Greenland. Lakes appear necessary to filter-out sediment and act as a winter refuge for Parr.

At shallow depths at sea, glaciers and even sea-ice can ground. Secondly, trout, during coldest eras would have needed to migrate into rivers completely locked Up with ice. Clearly impossible so, for me, a migration from the south is more likely. Though I’d be interested in how a Baltic route could work - that would seem to be only possible much later.

Best do your own research and rely on that as it’s a complicated and dynamic subject. AG
Fascinating stuff. Ever since reading about some populations of North East Sea Trout being tracked off the coast of Holland and thought to be following the great north river of which the Rhine, Thames, Tweed ect were but mere tributaries it’s always fascinated me.
I’ve not done much reading on it, but my understanding or theory was that when Doggerland was flooded so to was Britain forming those glacial lakes, hence their being landlocked herring like species and Arctic char? But honestly re the huge ice glaciers I can’t get my head round that one as it’s like the chicken and the egg thing.
 

Walleye

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All valid questions and I wouldn’t discount a lot of what you said about migration ect but in my experience on northern freestone rivers it can take a long time before the fish come out of the winter slumber? Personally I think the fish just hide away.
I would agree with that. I used to fish from March 22nd as a kid and the river would seem deserted for a month or so then it would come alive with the first decent hatches. With the cold spell it could just be too early so far. May is my favourite month for trout fishing.
 

Auldghillie

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Fascinating stuff. Ever since reading about some populations of North East Sea Trout being tracked off the coast of Holland and thought to be following the great north river of which the Rhine, Thames, Tweed ect were but mere tributaries it’s always fascinated me.
I’ve not done much reading on it, but my understanding or theory was that when Doggerland was flooded so to was Britain forming those glacial lakes, hence their being landlocked herring like species and Arctic char? But honestly re the huge ice glaciers I can’t get my head round that one as it’s like the chicken and the egg thing.
that is why I suggested to the irritated guy that he does his own research. The sequence of icemelt is hard to fathom. EG, north of the St Lawrence, glacial melt occurred in different directions in different glacial epochs causing landlocked salmon with different genetics in the same catchment. Also landlocked salmon where they are now free to migrate but do not do so. York & Newcastle Uni’s will be releasing Doggerland papers, I hope, then the North Sea rivers issues may become clearer. AG
 

Andrew B

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Can't wait for the sea trout fishing to start. Waiting for it to get dark on the first night fishing trip of the year takes some beating. And when you see the first fish leap, you know everything is OK.
Or when you don’t actually see it leap and wonder if you need to inform the farmer that one of his cows has fallen in the river😂
 

Lynnzer

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Bugger it. I was going out today as well but my son has a golf club being delivered to my address so I have to forego my sport for his.
Tomorrow, maybe.
 
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