River wear 2021

SteveG

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Not everyone closes their eyes. It's a different place. The dumping / flytipping culture is embedded over several generations. The local saying is "send it to Sunderland". Every farm has a dump on its land to save money on disposing of rubbish properly. We once cut open a dumpy bag to reveal it filled with around a hundred neatly folded feed bags. The dumpy bag was dumped juat a few yards from the river bank, because the floods would eventually take it away to Sunderland. If a farm is next to the river, the dump is the river bank. Businesses who throw old desks into the river 50 yards away.
There are individuals (not me) who do a huge amount to clean up the river and make it better for everyone. There is a rivers trust. There is a lot of work done by clubs on clean up days. But for the most part it is cleaning up and if that stops it will be back to square one. I've reported things ranging from beck digging to farmers dumps to kennels dumping their bags full of dog **** laden kennel saw dust into the river. I like to plant trees where they are needed and occasionally help out my brother who is amazing at doing what he does.
From Bishop downover, he tells me, its pretty much a losing battle unless something big happens to change how WE treat the river and our environment.

The EA has the power to educate and change cultures, and prosecute where necessary. I just don't see much happening. Maybe it is and someone from the EA reading this can put me right.
Farming culture unfortunately in a previous job I visited a lot of farmers and they often referred to the rivers as the means to dispose of unwanted rubbish - I think the worst I’ve seen is the dead calves dumped in the river this year not nice to see them hung up in the bushes decomposing, I assume they are young that have died and not been swept in by the river from the field as there are no tags in the ears
 

once bitten

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Nets start 1st June , 16 days earlier than CC& R ends
T/J Nets started 28th March. can only fish for sea trout and only till end of May after that it is closed for what was districts 1 & 2 (Holy Island down to Boulby Craggs which is just North of Staithes) 1st of June was starting date for drift nets and for salmon using T or J net, but no salmon can be retained now, any salmon caught must be returned to the water in the same way catch and release for rods works.

Cheers
 

once bitten

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I understand that currently the beach nets can operate in Area 1 (Coquet, Tyne, Wear and N Tees) from 26th March until 31st of May for Sea Trout, all Salmon to be returned. The drift nets no longer operate.
not that it is that critical but Area 1 runs from Just North of Holy Island (Beale Point) down to Souter Lighthouse between South Shields and Whitburn there are no T/J nets allowed now in district 2
 

Lynnzer

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Here is some underwater footage of the Willow pool at Durham that i took in mid April last year when the river was at summer level.I had the camera on a six foot pole,it shows how deep this pool is.
Anyone else notice the distinct lack of fish apart from what looks like a small Seatrout in the background.No Parr or owt.
This pool used to be full of Chub Barbel and Trout.

I'm pleased you made it clear that the camera was on a pole. I thought you'd fallen in.
Always wondered how deep this is. I nearly caught my biggest fish ever there many years ago. It threw the hook after it surfaced and dashed for safety. IT WAS BIG, but of course there's a distinct lack of evidence.

Talking of falling in I was farther down from there last week spinning from the bank when the damn bank gave way. Not too deep there but I went in head first and soaked myself from the chest up. A definite warning to others about bank safety after a spate.
 

Lynnzer

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Not everyone closes their eyes. It's a different place. The dumping / flytipping culture is embedded over several generations. The local saying is "send it to Sunderland". Every farm has a dump on its land to save money on disposing of rubbish properly. We once cut open a dumpy bag to reveal it filled with around a hundred neatly folded feed bags. The dumpy bag was dumped juat a few yards from the river bank, because the floods would eventually take it away to Sunderland. If a farm is next to the river, the dump is the river bank. Businesses who throw old desks into the river 50 yards away.
There are individuals (not me) who do a huge amount to clean up the river and make it better for everyone. There is a rivers trust. There is a lot of work done by clubs on clean up days. But for the most part it is cleaning up and if that stops it will be back to square one. I've reported things ranging from beck digging to farmers dumps to kennels dumping their bags full of dog **** laden kennel saw dust into the river. I like to plant trees where they are needed and occasionally help out my brother who is amazing at doing what he does.
From Bishop downover, he tells me, its pretty much a losing battle unless something big happens to change how WE treat the river and our environment.

The EA has the power to educate and change cultures, and prosecute where necessary. I just don't see much happening. Maybe it is and someone from the EA reading this can put me right.
I walked up from the Browney/Wear confluence the other day. I thought the Browney might look good for trout but hey....... Between the confluence to the A167 dual carriageway the bed is strewn with old tyres and the odd full wheel. It's a freakin mess. There has to be a garage somewhere along the stretch upstream as I can't see even a farmer having so many old tyres to dispose of, and none of them are bigger than what you'd find on a car or van. The water was clear otherwise although the sight of a messy muddy/silty bottom with tyres sticking out of it wasn't pretty. Not a sign of life all the way up either. I suspect loads of tyres have also washed into the Wear. Once over on rivers such as this you'd expect to see minnows, gudgeon and fry of other fish. NOTHING LIVES HERE
 
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Scierra

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I walked up from the Browney/Wear confluence the other day. I thought the Browney might look good for trout but hey....... Between the confluence to the A167 dual carriageway the bed is strewn with old tyres and the odd full wheel. It's a freakin mess. There has to be a garage somewhere along the stretch upstream as I can't see even a farmer having so many old tyres to dispose of, and none of them are bigger than what you'd find on a car or van. The water was clear otherwise although the sight of a messy muddy/silty bottom with tyres sticking out of it wasn't pretty. Not a sign of life all the way up either. I suspect loads of tyres have also washed into the Wear. Once over on rivers such as this you'd expect to see minnows, gudgeon and fry of other fish. NOTHING LIVES HERE
Goosanders probably cleaned the Browney of all fish life as they have on the whole Wear system , rubber tyres won't help either
 

Daventus

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Goosanders probably cleaned the Browney of all fish life as they have on the whole Wear system , rubber tyres won't help either
Tyres probably come from meadowfield industrial estate.But in theory should they not provide shelter for any fry or parr like they do for crabs when they are peeling,still a bloody disgrace/eyesore.
 

Walleye

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I walked up from the Browney/Wear confluence the other day. I thought the Browney might look good for trout but hey....... Between the confluence to the A167 dual carriageway the bed is strewn with old tyres and the odd full wheel. It's a freakin mess. There has to be a garage somewhere along the stretch upstream as I can't see even a farmer having so many old tyres to dispose of, and none of them are bigger than what you'd find on a car or van. The water was clear otherwise although the sight of a messy muddy/silty bottom with tyres sticking out of it wasn't pretty. Not a sign of life all the way up either. I suspect loads of tyres have also washed into the Wear. Once over on rivers such as this you'd expect to see minnows, gudgeon and fry of other fish. NOTHING LIVES HERE
Yeah, but standing on the a167 road bridge and watching the big sea trout bow waves running through is quite impressive.
The sludge is from farm runoff. The tyres are from anywhere...could easily be the bridge ove rate a167. On the roads near my home, new piles of tyres turn up every couple of days.
 

Walleye

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Goosanders probably cleaned the Browney of all fish life as they have on the whole Wear system , rubber tyres won't help either
If there was no fish life, there would be no goosanders and cormorants.
So there must be fish life or fish eating birds would go elsewhere.
Until recently, there were 20k or more returning spawners most years. If you go with a mortality rate at sea of 98%, around a million smolts leave the river Wear every year. So the river can't be lifeless.

Rubber tyres leach poisons into waterways.

The silt bothers me more......salmon and sea trout will spawn all the way from Chester le Street right up into the dales. With rivers like the Browney which throw a lot of colour into the river due to farm runoff, the chances of eggs surviving through the winter must reduce year on year. Wherever the river runs through farmland, there is a silt problem.
 

Scierra

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If there was no fish life, there would be no goosanders and cormorants.
So there must be fish life or fish eating birds would go elsewhere.
Until recently, there were 20k or more returning spawners most years. If you go with a mortality rate at sea of 98%, around a million smolts leave the river Wear every year. So the river can't be lifeless.
Try watching Mackenzie podcast with Fergal Sharkey & Karl Humphries? a goosander had 400 fry in its gut ? thats what these FEBs are feeding on , parr & smolts aswell, coarse fish too, There are next to none adult brown trout almost extinct , I see the smolt run late April and May, the male goosanders having a feast . the females busy nesting hatching young ,

There fry have yet to emerge , Wild brown trout were numerous back in the 1960'sand could be caught on opening trout season 21st March , rare as RHS now
 

Lynnzer

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Yeah, but standing on the a167 road bridge and watching the big sea trout bow waves running through is quite impressive.
The sludge is from farm runoff. The tyres are from anywhere...could easily be the bridge over rate a167. On the roads near my home, new piles of tyres turn up every couple of days.
From Google Earth I see that there's a metal recycling plant along the side https://www.google.com/maps/place/A...935920c62497b2c!8m2!3d54.7209404!4d-1.5768454 I can't seem to link anything so have the full location here.
It could be that all the cars they recycle have their tyres removed as useless rubber which are also expensive to get rid of. The plant is very close to the river and I wouldn't mind betting that if you go upstream from there that you won't find any tyres.
Wildlife - I saw the same heron as the week before, standing at the foot of the old bridge and nothing else except for mallards and loads of otter footprints.
I wish I knew about the decimation of the fish population before I started to build my gear up again including expensive waders, boots, reels etc. I might just have stuck with sea fishing even though that's taken a hit as well.
 

greenlaner2009

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From Google Earth I see that there's a metal recycling plant along the side https://www.google.com/maps/place/A...935920c62497b2c!8m2!3d54.7209404!4d-1.5768454 I can't seem to link anything so have the full location here.
It could be that all the cars they recycle have their tyres removed as useless rubber which are also expensive to get rid of. The plant is very close to the river and I wouldn't mind betting that if you go upstream from there that you won't find any tyres.
Wildlife - I saw the same heron as the week before, standing at the foot of the old bridge and nothing else except for mallards and loads of otter footprints.
I wish I knew about the decimation of the fish population before I started to build my gear up again including expensive waders, boots, reels etc. I might just have stuck with sea fishing even though that's taken a hit as well.
I would take the doom and gloom on this river wear thread with a pinch of salt, individual anglers on the river caught in excess of 60 fish each last season, I personally know one angler who hooked 17 fish and landed 13 in a four hour session, so it can't be as bad as some would want people to believe
 

tynelobster

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I would take the doom and gloom on this river wear thread with a pinch of salt, individual anglers on the river caught in excess of 60 fish each last season, I personally know one angler who hooked 17 fish and landed 13 in a four hour session, so it can't be as bad as some would want people to believe
Specifically though any fly life or rising trout - I've seen neither thus far - but it has been cold :eek:
 

Lynnzer

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Specifically though any fly life or rising trout - I've seen neither thus far - but it has been cold :eek:
Can't deny the fish numbers caught but it could be from way upstream.
I have driven over the river for years and always wanted to fish it.
Apparently it isn't part of Durham City Anglers club waters anymore so perhaps someone knows who has rights to any part of it.
Also the lower stretch where it meets the Wear may just be the final dumping ground for all the waste coming from much further up and not representative of the whole river.

The Deerness as well as the Browney should be a good hunting place for grayling
 

Lynnzer

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I like small water fishing, i wonder if there is any fishing access. Cant seem to find owt on the net.
I fancied a crack at the River Team that runs through the Team Valley ind est.
The section just before it goes underground and runs through Team Valley looked kind of canny and it had just been stocked with dace and chub. I drove into the farmyard alongside that stretch with a bottle wine and the farmer gave me permission to fish.
So could be the same sort of thing on the Deerness if you could find out who the landowner is.

I know it's a bit of a drive but I was in the Royal Engineers art Ripon and I used to fish the river Laver there. it had loads of really good size grayling and trout. Haven't been there since the 70's though/
 

Walleye

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From Google Earth I see that there's a metal recycling plant along the side https://www.google.com/maps/place/A...935920c62497b2c!8m2!3d54.7209404!4d-1.5768454 I can't seem to link anything so have the full location here.
It could be that all the cars they recycle have their tyres removed as useless rubber which are also expensive to get rid of. The plant is very close to the river and I wouldn't mind betting that if you go upstream from there that you won't find any tyres.
Wildlife - I saw the same heron as the week before, standing at the foot of the old bridge and nothing else except for mallards and loads of otter footprints.
I wish I knew about the decimation of the fish population before I started to build my gear up again including expensive waders, boots, reels etc. I might just have stuck with sea fishing even though that's taken a hit as well.
Greenlaner is right, it's still a cracking river to fish, its just the trout fishing "isn't as good as it was many years ago".

So don't sell your gear, get down for the trout with Czech Nymphing tackle or heavy weighted nymphs swung deep and across.

I whinged on to an old guy about eight to ten years ago about the scarcity of fish and he pretty much bollocked me. He said I need to get my fly down underneath the parr. The fly life has changed but the big trout are still there in numbers. He fished with 2 or 3 weighted nymphs, as deep as possible and according to him he caught his fair share of trout to 2lb+ every year.

I rarely see a big trout rise these days but they are there. Rarely a year goes by when I don't catch the odd big trout or two while fishing for sea trout or salmon. I guess the old guy was right but tbh my time is so scarce I rarely get chance to spend a day trout fishing these days and test out what he says.

I've heard a couple of theories about the non rising trout...
1 midges dominate due to a combination of silt and pollution. If you get to the river and there are clouds of midges it's too late; the trout are already hiding up digesting their food.
2 more predators means those trout, parr etc in the best and safest lies don't fall foul of febs. It may just be we are fishing for even more wary fish than 30 yrs ago. The fish that 30 years ago we didn't even know existed because we were all busy fishing for the confident risers at the surface..
These two would also explain why we don't see many small fish but they seem to be still there in reasonable numbers.
 

Walleye

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I fancied a crack at the River Team that runs through the Team Valley ind est.
The section just before it goes underground and runs through Team Valley looked kind of canny and it had just been stocked with dace and chub. I drove into the farmyard alongside that stretch with a bottle wine and the farmer gave me permission to fish.
So could be the same sort of thing on the Deerness if you could find out who the landowner is.

I know it's a bit of a drive but I was in the Royal Engineers art Ripon and I used to fish the river Laver there. it had loads of really good size grayling and trout. Haven't been there since the 70's though/
When you were fishing the river Team, you were fishing the old course of the River Wear before the last ice age when the Wear was a tributary of the river Tyne and went from CLS up through team valley to the Tyne.
Apparently the last ice age dropped huge mounds of glacial deposits between CLS and Team Valley and the Wear cut a new course through to the sea at Sunderland.
 

Lgraydonflyfishing

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I would take the doom and gloom on this river wear thread with a pinch of salt, individual anglers on the river caught in excess of 60 fish each last season, I personally know one angler who hooked 17 fish and landed 13 in a four hour session, so it can't be as bad as some would want people to believe
I too know a lad who got 60+ I was telling a man down vinovium one day and he looked at me like I'd just fell from another planet, know another lad who got 58 and another who got 50+ aswel, I was out like week watching plenty flies come off and the browns were on them, sipping them off the surface (holywell)
 

Lynnzer

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When you were fishing the river Team, you were fishing the old course of the River Wear before the last ice age when the Wear was a tributary of the river Tyne and went from CLS up through team valley to the Tyne.
Apparently the last ice age dropped huge mounds of glacial deposits between CLS and Team Valley and the Wear cut a new course through to the sea at Sunderland.
Ah, That's why all the fish caught in the Wear have a definite broad Geordie accent.
 

dave1959

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I fancied a crack at the River Team that runs through the Team Valind est.
The section just before it goes underground and runs through Team Valley looked kind of canny and it had just been stocked with dace and chub. I drove into the farmyard alongside that stretch with a bottle wine and the farmer gave me permission to fish.
So could be the same sort of thing on the Deerness if you could find out who the landowner is.

I know it's a bit of a drive but I was in the Royal Engineers art Ripon and I used to fish the river Laver there. it had loads of really good size grayling and trout. Haven't been there since the 70's though/
I was looking at the Team on google maps and it did cross my mind to fish it. Im in a club that has lovely small stream fishing on Howl Beck that enters the sea at Saltburn, but always looking for more. If not too far away. Ripon Anglers had the Laver, but i think the club has been dissolved unfortunately.
 

dave1959

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When you were fishing the river Team, you were fishing the old course of the River Wear before the last ice age when the Wear was a tributary of the river Tyne and went from CLS up through team valley to the Tyne.
Apparently the last ice age dropped huge mounds of glacial deposits between CLS and Team Valley and the Wear cut a new course through to the sea at Sunderland.
I didnt know that John. thanks for that info.
 
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