River Tees 2019

Ian Alex

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IMG_20190109_101446953.jpg Well someone has to get 2019 up and running. Working on some new variant patterns, I had no firm idea in mind when I started this, it ended up as a kind of Blue Charm Variant, retaining only the wing and hackle of the original. I used dyed blue squirrel tail, for the tail. Holographic gold tinsel for the body, and hot orange 6 tying thread. Actually I quite like it.

I'm not expecting 2019 to be much better than 2018. Predictions are for another heatwave ( in line with climate change modelling) only more intense than 2018's heatwave; having said that, who really knows what the weather will do, might well be a washout.

Overall, the same problems exist on the Tees, and without improved fish passage at the Barrage, it's not going to change.

Well, good luck , you're going to need it plus utilising the skills you've already built up over time.

Best
Ian
 

Ian Alex

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Tees Salmon

Thanks 👍 for the information. I can find nothing in it to disagree with.

The problems on the Tees are many and each one requires a different solution.

In any event it's going to take a long long time to revive the Tees. I don't believe anyone can think otherwise.

Cheers
Ian
 

Stivy

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Hi, I tried a few hours fishing for grayling yesterday giving some tuition with two complete novices.
It wasn't much good due to the water rising and being a tad too coloured.
The first thing we saw was a young otter hunting in the pool about 200 yards above the bridge. It seemed to be chasing kelts because quite a few were splashing around.
It won't please everyone but it was nice to see the river with some nature in it. I don't think the otters will impact too much on the salmon population and I guess it could have been hunting the dace and grayling as much as the kelts?
 

Rrrr

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Hi, I tried a few hours fishing for grayling yesterday giving some tuition with two complete novices.
It wasn't much good due to the water rising and being a tad too coloured.
The first thing we saw was a young otter hunting in the pool about 200 yards above the bridge. It seemed to be chasing kelts because quite a few were splashing around.
It won't please everyone but it was nice to see the river with some nature in it. I don't think the otters will impact too much on the salmon population and I guess it could have been hunting the dace and grayling as much as the kelts?
They probably take the odd salmon but not enough to really worry about compared to the seals etc, they will probably take more coarse fish than anything else.

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lax0341

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They probably take the odd salmon but not enough to really worry about compared to the seals etc, they will probably take more coarse fish than anything else.

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If there are not too many otters it doesn‘t harm. But if the population grows they can effect the brown trout, grayling and parr/smolt
population.
 

Procurator Fishcal

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Hi, I tried a few hours fishing for grayling yesterday giving some tuition with two complete novices.
It wasn't much good due to the water rising and being a tad too coloured.
The first thing we saw was a young otter hunting in the pool about 200 yards above the bridge. It seemed to be chasing kelts because quite a few were splashing around.
It won't please everyone but it was nice to see the river with some nature in it. I don't think the otters will impact too much on the salmon population and I guess it could have been hunting the dace and grayling as much as the kelts?
Always good to see otters. They have very large territories and will drive away (and sometimes kill and eat) mink. They are opportunistic feeders and will take birds and rabbits as well as fish. Although plenty of people seem to see them as a pest, I'm quite happy to share the rivers with them.

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cgaines10

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0 through the counter for January. I haven't been down to the Barrage as much as I'd of liked.

I did go a couple of times and the gates were down but they were only small tides & I didn't see any fish or seal activity.

Hopefully with all this snow melt etc it freshens the river up.
 

Ian Alex

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To be fair, looking back over the statistics for the counter, virtually no fish attempt to pass during January and February. It's fair to say the Tees is a summer/autumn river.
 

Walleye

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Regarding otters, they, like most predators, will take sick and dying fish as they are easier to catch. Healthy levels of predation should make the river healthier and keep disease at bay, natural selection and all that.

I love to fish with otters, kingfishers, herons and the like. It's a sign of a healthy river. FEBs are a problem because they are introduced and the river can't sustain large populations. Seals are just opportunists taking advantage of our silly practise of putting major dams on salmon rivers. You can't really blame the seal for taking advantage of our stupidity.
 

lax0341

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FEB‘s

For me it‘s a problem to mix the different birds together. Cormorants and goosanders for example are much more dangerous for salmonid rivers than herons or kingfishers.
 

Bluesnappa

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I think the stocking of triploid trout is also a problem. They grow fast and out compete parr/smolts for food and no doubt eat eggs. The EA sees nothing wrong with putting them in as it attracts trout fishermen and hence money. Wild trout alone don’t have the attraction to the anglers as they are smaller and fewer, if indeed there are any left with the competition of the triploid. The powers that be need to decide what sort of river they want the Tees to be - a glorified long, thin put and take lake or a wild salmon and trout river.
 

Stivy

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1st Fish of the season?

I have heard a springer was caught this week below Eggleston on a spinner by a guy fishing for salmon for his first time?
 

Ian Alex

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I find that hard to believe, possible it was Kelt. Under the new restrictions are not trebles banned. Although some spinners have singles. I am sceptical of hearsay reports in general and seriously this does not seem to me to have any veracity.
 

Stivy

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Hi Ian,
Veracity? very good word that.
I am reporting what I have been told by a very reliable friend (he has been told about the capture). We are waiting for a picture for confirmation.

I remember that early last year we got to know about a very big springer caught up in the Eggleston area but they guy did not want it broadcasted because the suspicion was that it never went back. There were also two springers caught downstream from the bridge at Piercebridge that never got publicised because they never went back either.

Regarding the legality of trebles etc...….that is not a point I am making but for what it's worth, I am not sure what the regulations are (is anyone?).
Are you allowed to spin for Pike and maybe Chub or Trout?
If I go fishing for Salmon on the Tees it would almost certainly be with a fly on a treble or a double unless someone in authority comes out and confirms precisely what the law/regulations are.
 

Ian Alex

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Hi Stivy,,

It's good word, somewhat like verification Yes I recall the rumours last season. Tees springers remind me of unicorns, and other mythological creatures. My thoughts for what their worth, is the Tees had a spring run once, but the barrage killed it off.

Now you've no doubt noticed this winter has been notable for its lack of rain. I think this summer maybe dry and hot, climate change is becoming a major problem.

You'd have to check the new bylaws in force, I'm certain trebles are banned. I think this the norm on catch and release category rivers.

Cheers.
 

NEbody

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There are no new byelaws on hooks or methods. I’m told it was too difficult to get something that was appropriate everywhere and the potential benefits were marginal.

C&R is mandatory on ‘at Risk’ and ‘recovering’ rivers. The Tees is now ‘Probably at Risk’ so C&R isn’t mandatory but a voluntary release rate >90% is being looked for with a view to making it mandatory if it’s not achieved. The whole of the Yorkshire Ouse system is classed as ‘recovering ‘.
 

dave1959

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Aye, the river had a good run of spring fish before the barrage was built and they were caught mainly on the lower river. I would be really surprised to see fish caught above Barney at this time of year.
 

greenlaner2009

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in the early 2000s when I fished bishop Auckland water on the tees at Egglestone bridge Easter was the prime time for a spring fish. I never got one but a few people who could fish at the right water heights used to get them.
 
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