Ribble 2021

Andrew B

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Always thought the Hodder was like a Scottish river or something? Beautiful place and I’m sure there is a Hodder way, starting from Slaidburn where I’ve had some really good days for Grayling.
I remember reading about that stretch in 2010, where Grayling fisherman had to avoid pools of spawning salmon? Not somewhere you need Wade anyway but I’ve often wondered if there’s large numbers of spawning fish up there since?
 

carma2

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Always thought the Hodder was like a Scottish river or something? Beautiful place and I’m sure there is a Hodder way, starting from Slaidburn where I’ve had some really good days for Grayling.
I remember reading about that stretch in 2010, where Grayling fisherman had to avoid pools of spawning salmon? Not somewhere you need Wade anyway but I’ve often wondered if there’s large numbers of spawning fish up there since?
salmon and seatrout back up from the dam at stocks res as when the res was built no fishpass was installed , have seen the pools stuffed with spawning fish , often wondered what it would have been like if the fish pass had happened .
not fished the Hodder for years now lovely river and challenging to get about on the banks .
 

Occasional salmon fisher

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Always thought the Hodder was like a Scottish river or something? Beautiful place and I’m sure there is a Hodder way, starting from Slaidburn where I’ve had some really good days for Grayling.
I remember reading about that stretch in 2010, where Grayling fisherman had to avoid pools of spawning salmon? Not somewhere you need Wade anyway but I’ve often wondered if there’s large numbers of spawning fish up there since?
You are right, there is. At 25 miles, could be a project for a day walk if I can arrange transport at both ends.

 
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noeyedeer

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salmon and seatrout back up from the dam at stocks res as when the res was built no fishpass was installed , have seen the pools stuffed with spawning fish , often wondered what it would have been like if the fish pass had happened .
not fished the Hodder for years now lovely river and challenging to get about on the banks .

Aye, imagine the popularity for fishing on Stocks if there was a fish pass like on the Tummel etc
 

Occasional salmon fisher

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I enjoyed the programme. The most interesting bit was the Stonyhurst College section where they used to net out enough seatrout to feed the college and local community, up to 400 in a day !
 

budge

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Missed it had it in my head it was 8 o'clock will try catchup.

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pjthunt

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Enjoyed it. Now we know why there are not so many Seatrout in the Hodder after so much netting :D:D
 

sutty

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Enjoyed it. Now we know why there are not so many Seatrout in the Hodder after so much netting :D:D
Best part of that was they kept accurate records and a close eye on the numbers to avoid overfishing, lol.
 

Andrew B

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Aye, imagine the popularity for fishing on Stocks if there was a fish pass like on the Tummel etc
That would be something wouldn’t it? There are some lakes in Wales such as Llyn Nantle which feeds the the prolific river Llynfi, Llyn Cwellyn and Llyn Padarn that feeds the Seiont at Carnavon. There’s even some on Anglesey that have runs of sea trout but here’s the thing, they hardly ever turn up in catches even when anglers know they are there?

That said I don’t think it would of done any harm to provide a fish pass into stocks as it would have potentially opened up many more miles of small spawning streams but wouldn’t it mean the stocking of fish would have to cease because of the predation on salmonids?
There’s a brilliant short story at the back of the Henry Williamson book “Salar the Salmon” ( Tara the otter fame) and I think he’s writing about the Devon river Avon Dam where the author catches the most perfect silver looking trout of about ten inches? The theory being that when it was damned some spawning sea trout were landlocked and spawned these littler silver things. I’ve since seen other similar catches down in the West Country.

I’d be amazed if the upper Hodder at Slaidburn still has those numbers, albeit I’ve caught plenty of parr and smolts there in the spring.
 

Andrew B

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Enjoyed it. Now we know why there are not so many Seatrout in the Hodder after so much netting :D:D

As occasional salmon fisher mentioned I don’t think Netting had much of an impact in the past but what does worry me now is a fish van that turns up in Barnoldswick each week with fresh sea trout that’s way too affordable? Now that does bother me as we’re i to guess, these fish are likely destined for the Lune, Ribble and Hodder and just like those being netted on the east coast in their thousands I can’t think that this is being done legally and believe me these sea trout are all three pound fish minimum.
 

budge

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As occasional salmon fisher mentioned I don’t think Netting had much of an impact in the past but what does worry me now is a fish van that turns up in Barnoldswick each week with fresh sea trout that’s way too affordable? Now that does bother me as we’re i to guess, these fish are likely destined for the Lune, Ribble and Hodder and just like those being netted on the east coast in their thousands I can’t think that this is being done legally and believe me these sea trout are all three pound fish minimum.
I'm pretty sure legally netted fish should have a tag through the mouth/gill cover. They sell them on our local market in season and they ain't cheap.

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Andrew B

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I'm pretty sure legally netted fish should have a tag through the mouth/gill cover. They sell them on our local market in season and they ain't cheap.

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I’m gonna go and take a look for this.
 

Ribble Rod

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Could it be that sea trout are farm reared as are the salmon? I must admit I've not heard of a sea trout farm reared but if the fish are all a standard size could be a possibility. Maybe one of the Scottish lads could provide the answer.
 

charlieH

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Could it be that sea trout are farm reared as are the salmon? I must admit I've not heard of a sea trout farm reared but if the fish are all a standard size could be a possibility. Maybe one of the Scottish lads could provide the answer.
There are certainly farms rearing rainbow trout in salt water - Loch Etive for example - and they are often sold as 'sea trout'. See here:https://thecornishfishmonger.co.uk/seatrout.html

Whether they should be allowed to use the term sea trout is a moot point, but it is clearly not the same as wild sea trout - not even the same species. And I wouldn't expect any fisherman to confuse the two!
 

Ribble Rod

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I agree its confusing and misleading to call trout sea trout by that name when clearly they are rainbows, but I think they can use it as these rainbows may have been reared in salt water farms. I've seen some of the top chefs cooking "Sea Trout " menus but when you look they are clearly rainbows. I think naming them sea trout will generate a higher price for the general public to pay.
 

pjthunt

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I agree its confusing and misleading to call trout sea trout by that name when clearly they are rainbows, but I think they can use it as these rainbows may have been reared in salt water farms. I've seen some of the top chefs cooking "Sea Trout " menus but when you look they are clearly rainbows. I think naming them sea trout will generate a higher price for the general public to pay.
Not pretending to be an expert on North America I would have thought they should have been called Steelhead, or perhaps I am wrong.
 

Rennie

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You can probably tell how Lock Down's staritng to grind and desperation is setting in, but any news Ribble side, any reports of fish at all seen, hooked, lost, even caught!. Surely can't be much longer, must be some Salmon Angling presence on the river?
Pedro.
 

SP8

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That would be something wouldn’t it? There are some lakes in Wales such as Llyn Nantle which feeds the the prolific river Llynfi, Llyn Cwellyn and Llyn Padarn that feeds the Seiont at Carnavon. There’s even some on Anglesey that have runs of sea trout but here’s the thing, they hardly ever turn up in catches even when anglers know they are there?

That said I don’t think it would of done any harm to provide a fish pass into stocks as it would have potentially opened up many more miles of small spawning streams but wouldn’t it mean the stocking of fish would have to cease because of the predation on salmonids?
There’s a brilliant short story at the back of the Henry Williamson book “Salar the Salmon” ( Tara the otter fame) and I think he’s writing about the Devon river Avon Dam where the author catches the most perfect silver looking trout of about ten inches? The theory being that when it was damned some spawning sea trout were landlocked and spawned these littler silver things. I’ve since seen other similar catches down in the West Country.

I’d be amazed if the upper Hodder at Slaidburn still has those numbers, albeit I’ve caught plenty of parr and smolts there in the spring.
I seem to remember that it was believed that there were "landlocked' seatrout in Stocks after it was flooded. However in view of the fact that a seatrout is just a brown trout that went on its holidays I don't know how you could tell. It's possible that for a while fish continued to drop into the reservoir and maybe fed there before returning upstream to spawn. They maybe still do. I don't know if they would silver up like a sea run fish though.

SP8
 
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