Ribble 2021

Andrew B

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They were quite possibly springers but more likely to have been sat in one of the big pools lower down or Long Preston deeps then run on the high water last week.

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Lol duh of course they did😂 Thought I was being really smart there but yeah chances are they’d literally just turned up on that only real spate we’ve had.
 

budge

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Lol duh of course they did Thought I was being really smart there but yeah chances are they’d literally just turned up on that only real spate we’ve had.
I'm sure a fresh fish entering the river at this time of year could get up there in a couple of days given the right conditions and the urge to spawn. I just don't think there's many about now though. I had a walk yesterday around Samlesbury and never saw a fin

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Andrew B

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I'm sure a fresh fish entering the river at this time of year could get up there in a couple of days given the right conditions and the urge to spawn. I just don't think there's many about now though. I had a walk yesterday around Samlesbury and never saw a fin

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I know and it’s incredibly sad for the river and those who fish it? If you think in terms of how Salmon rivers often fill up from the top down and how Spring, summer and then Autumn fish would run to different areas. We basically now have only a few months class of salmon to run the river imo.
Couldn’t help notice cormorants on the river last week, doing their thing on the deeper sections.
 

budge

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I know and it’s incredibly sad for the river and those who fish it? If you think in terms of how Salmon rivers often fill up from the top down and how Spring, summer and then Autumn fish would run to different areas. We basically now have only a few months class of salmon to run the river imo.
Couldn’t help notice cormorants on the river last week, doing their thing on the deeper sections.
Yeah I was talking to a guy the other week who said a large flock had arrived in Preston docks much earlier than usual and we're flying upstream to feed. I saw a flock of around 20 flying over one of the lower beats. I'm yet to be convinced that predation in the river is the main problem though as the coarse fishing has been the best for years with loads of small silver fish, not just barbel.

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sutty

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I'd take some convincing too. Their numbers are under pressure as well. When the river was stuffed, kind of bank to bank with migrating fish, can you imagine how many predators there were. Seems the salmon did okay back then, pitting their wits against them, for millions of years, so I don't see how they suddenly can't. If the numbers of predators are up, the number of prey items must be up too, so they can't be feeding on salmon in the Ribble, lol.
 

Andrew B

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Yeah I was talking to a guy the other week who said a large flock had arrived in Preston docks much earlier than usual and we're flying upstream to feed. I saw a flock of around 20 flying over one of the lower beats. I'm yet to be convinced that predation in the river is the main problem though as the coarse fishing has been the best for years with loads of small silver fish, not just barbel.

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I’m not so sure about Cormorants Budge but to answer Sutty reply about how the fish fared years ago? I’ve been a fairly keen bird watcher ever since I was a nipper and we simply didn’t have gooseanders to worry about in the U.K. going back to when I was a kid in the eighties and even in the nineties to see a sawbill duck would be a noteworthy sighting.
Sawbills do feed largely on a diet of baby salmonids. I mean they have to as the Cumbrian Derwent has over two hundred pairs and I’ve seen these fish in March diving down to eat the only fish available at that time, which is salmon and trout parr and then when they smolt it’s even worse?
All other things aside I still think that “unprecedented” annual floods in the winter after spawning is the single biggest threat to Salmon nation wide, with not enough ideal spawning years in between these floods but seriously the work carried out on the Derwent and St Johns Beck after decent numbers on the redds also suggest that sawbills are also decimating the smolts.
 

budge

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All these things probably play a part in the decline in the numbers of salmon but I still think what happens at sea is the biggest factor. If it was just down to floods and predators then brown trout and grayling numbers would surely have seen a similar decline ? In many rivers including the Ribble they haven't.

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Not sure I have seen any salmon with even a bit of silver left on them in October at the Foss. But every shade of red, brown and black ! !Have definitely seen the ones just popping their heads out and all types of leaping. Some powerfull and landing more than half way up the fall, some not even reaching the fall !
 

largy2001

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I’m not so sure about Cormorants Budge but to answer Sutty reply about how the fish fared years ago? I’ve been a fairly keen bird watcher ever since I was a nipper and we simply didn’t have gooseanders to worry about in the U.K. going back to when I was a kid in the eighties and even in the nineties to see a sawbill duck would be a noteworthy sighting.
Sawbills do feed largely on a diet of baby salmonids. I mean they have to as the Cumbrian Derwent has over two hundred pairs and I’ve seen these fish in March diving down to eat the only fish available at that time, which is salmon and trout parr and then when they smolt it’s even worse?
All other things aside I still think that “unprecedented” annual floods in the winter after spawning is the single biggest threat to Salmon nation wide, with not enough ideal spawning years in between these floods but seriously the work carried out on the Derwent and St Johns Beck after decent numbers on the redds also suggest that sawbills are also decimating the smolts.
I’ve seen loads of these on the derwent as well, mind you I haven’t seen as many this season compared to the previous
 

Warwick I

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One Cormorant died from lead a couple of years ago on our water. We checked it's stomach to see what had been eating and it was surprising to see it had been hoovering up Stickle Backs and Minnows over fifty of them plus one Parr. Most of the Cormorants we see on our inland waters I am told by bird experts are the European variety where they feed in fresh water over there and come here in large flocks to raid our lakes and rivers.
 
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Occasional salmon fisher

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One Cormorant died from lead a couple of years ago on our water. We checked it's stomach to see what had been eating and it was surprising to see it had been hoovering up Stickle and Minnows over fifty of them plus one Parr. Most of the Cormorants we see on our inland waters I am told by bird experts are the European variety where they feed in fresh water over there and come here in large flocks to raid our lakes and rivers.

And extremely efficient at hunting in packs and hoovering up freshwater fish. Apparently clearing out some stretches of the Eden.
 

sutty

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We went yesterday, and it was a great water, dropping from 0.42m to 0.34m whilst we were there, as per the gauge at Gisburn. We fished from just before lunch until dark. Never saw or felt a salmon, not even a fin, but I had a cracking trout, which in the fast water I thought was a small salmon for a while. Started to have my doubts fairly soon, and once I got it near the surface and saw it, I got the bad news, lol. Still, it was a lovely fish, and my biggest trout of the year. Didn't weigh it, but it looked a good bit bigger than the two pounders I've been getting this season.
 
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Andrew B

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All these things probably play a part in the decline in the numbers of salmon but I still think what happens at sea is the biggest factor. If it was just down to floods and predators then brown trout and grayling numbers would surely have seen a similar decline ? In many rivers including the Ribble they haven't.

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We went yesterday, and it was a great water, dropping from 0.42m to 0.34m whilst we were there, as per the gauge at Gisburn. We fished from just before lunch until dark. Never saw or felt a salmon, not even a fin, but I had a cracking trout, which in the fast water I thought was a small salmon for a while. Started to have my doubts fairly soon, and once I got it near the surface and saw it, I got the bad news, lol. Still, it was a lovely fish, and my biggest trout of the year. Didn't weight it, but it looked a good bit bigger than the two pounders I've been getting this season.
Nonetheless they are something else those big Ribble trout. I saw one caught at Mitton on a Rapala the other week and it must of been getting on three pounds and looked as nice as Wild chalk stream trout imo. Still one would of expected it to be a migratory fish in such conditions, which is very worrying.
In answer to Budges comment about Trout n Grayling I have noticed a massive drop off in Grayling as well. When the Ribble Trust first put in all of the various fish passes, the first fish we noticed on Colne water was Grayling and for two years after a June flood we had pools of up to fifty Grayling around half pound. Not seen or caught any for a few years now.
Ribble Trust have done everything possible imo and we’ve had salmon spawning as far up as Trawden on Colne water as I’ve caught the smolts and parr but I can’t see many getting up this year.
 

Ratman

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One Cormorant died from lead a couple of years ago on our water. We checked it's stomach to see what had been eating and it was surprising to see it had been hoovering up Stickle Backs and Minnows over fifty of them plus one Parr. Most of the Cormorants we see on our inland waters I am told by bird experts are the European variety where they feed in fresh water over there and come here in large flocks to raid our lakes and rivers.
I opened one up a few years ago and it had 2 chub and a trout in its stomach all well over a pound in weight. Its stomach filled the full length of its cavity.
 

Lancsflyman

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Nonetheless they are something else those big Ribble trout. I saw one caught at Mitton on a Rapala the other week and it must of been getting on three pounds and looked as nice as Wild chalk stream trout imo. Still one would of expected it to be a migratory fish in such conditions, which is very worrying.
In answer to Budges comment about Trout n Grayling I have noticed a massive drop off in Grayling as well. When the Ribble Trust first put in all of the various fish passes, the first fish we noticed on Colne water was Grayling and for two years after a June flood we had pools of up to fifty Grayling around half pound. Not seen or caught any for a few years now.
Ribble Trust have done everything possible imo and we’ve had salmon spawning as far up as Trawden on Colne water as I’ve caught the smolts and parr but I can’t see many getting up this year.
I don’t think the bulk of the fish have run yet…
It’s a totally different season this year from the ones we’re used to having.
I have a feeling they’ll run out of season unless we get a bank high flood.
I had my first of the season yesterday 6lb grilse but I can’t say I’ve seen many salmon at all this season.
Let’s hope we get the fish come on this next lift 🙏
 
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Andrew B

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I don’t think the bulk of the fish have run yet…
It’s a totally different season this year from the ones we’re use to having.
I have a feeling they’ll run out of season unless we get a bank high flood.
I had my first of the season yesterday 6lb grilse but I can’t say I’ve seen many salmon at all this season.
Let’s hope we get the fish come on this next lift 🙏
That’s my hope. Don’t know if there’s any decent places for counting redds but I’ll be interested to hear over the winter if there’s been much activity.
I can think of the Cumbrian Derwent only recently having one such year, where the fish came in a month or so late and headed straight for Threkeld and St. John’s Beck?
 
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budge

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I don’t think the bulk of the fish have run yet…
It’s a totally different season this year from the ones we’re used to having.
I have a feeling they’ll run out of season unless we get a bank high flood.
I had my first of the season yesterday 6lb grilse but I can’t say I’ve seen many salmon at all this season.
Let’s hope we get the fish come on this next lift
Hope so Paul although I would prefer it to happen next week

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Rennie

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I've noticed the new site dosen't give a simple rising or falling indication, unless I'm reading it wrongly, that will be down as to how one interprets the 5 day graph.I looked at 5am this morning and rolled over, at .7m at Gisburn Ribble would be too high untill probably late afternoon at best. The UK River Levels website whilst using the same monitoring station as the Govt. website, gives a rising or falling indication with the height level for that station and lower down the page there are stations above and below where you are looking so you can build a fair picture of how the river is behaving.
I use a combination of both sites and in the daylight hours combine those with the RFCA web cams. It's saved me a wasted journey a number of times now, but it could also be said I've maybe lost a chance worth taking too?
Pedro, sat at home with tea and toast!.
 

budge

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I've noticed the new site dosen't give a simple rising or falling indication, unless I'm reading it wrongly, that will be down as to how one interprets the 5 day graph.I looked at 5am this morning and rolled over, at .7m at Gisburn Ribble would be too high untill probably late afternoon at best. The UK River Levels website whilst using the same monitoring station as the Govt. website, gives a rising or falling indication with the height level for that station and lower down the page there are stations above and below where you are looking so you can build a fair picture of how the river is behaving.
I use a combination of both sites and in the daylight hours combine those with the RFCA web cams. It's saved me a wasted journey a number of times now, but it could also be said I've maybe lost a chance worth taking too?
Pedro, sat at home with tea and toast!.
Things are improving although the biggest one for anyone fishing the lower river is the lack of a camera to give an idea of water colour. I've had one or two wasted trips with water levels looking ok but found a cocoa coloured river when I arrived. Can't beat poking a head over a bridge

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noeyedeer

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Wow, just looked at the new River levels .GOV site.
You get 15 minute timestamped readings, a big difference on the twice a day situation before when in a non-flood risk period.
Assuming they continue with that frequency it should give a much better idea of the trending (rising/falling) situation. You can also download a CSV file for those that like to analyse further!
 

sutty

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I had already commented earlier in this thread, that the new site is much better. Very frequent updates, easy to spot a trend, and the quick links to upstream downstream make it easier to just pop upstream to check if anything is coming, and then to drop back down to the one in question.

Pete mentioned that there isn't a rising falling telltale, but in fairness, I hadn't even noticed it was gone, because one glance at the graph pretty much tells you that. Coupled with the fact that you can just click upstream, in my case to look at the one near Settle, is brilliant for predicting what will come next.

I'm really pleased with it and have already provided feedback to tell them so.
 
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