Red skin disease

LouisCha

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Quite a few fish with turned up with that disease in southern Norway last spring, I don't know if the vets/scientists found much out about it. Looks like it's back this year, worrying to see
 

mows

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Pictures of some of the first caught fish this year showed some signs.
I'm not seeing it on pictures of any fish caught in the last week or so.
 

westie4566

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Pictures of some of the first caught fish this year showed some signs.
I'm not seeing it on pictures of any fish caught in the last week or so.
Do you follow the Tweed Page on FB Alan? There was a pic of a fish from last week that I thought may have had it.
 

mows

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Must have missed that one Andy, as I've been looking. Last year we had disease until July, I think because of the red belly. Nearly all the disease is now gone, though I've seen a couple of diseased seafront in the last week.
 

westie4566

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Must have missed that one Andy, as I've been looking. Last year we had disease until July, I think because of the red belly. Nearly all the disease is now gone, though I've seen a couple of diseased seafront in the last week.
It was this fish from Lower Birgham - what do you think?
LB.jpg
 

Westcountry

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Is this red skin desease dangerous for people?
Well as nobody knows what causes it I don't suppose anyone can actually say it isn't dangerous to people.
But having seen and handled some last year I know you wouldn't want to eat one anyway! I don't know of anyone who handled one who ended up with a red belly either...


Andy
 

Grassy_Knollington

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3900C801-2558-4C5E-8989-1F6C5368823F.jpeg

One from last week of June in Scotland last year to my brother, showing the early symptoms of the ‘condition’.

The feeling was that the good water during the late spring & into the summer ‘flushed’ it through and stopped it taking hold. Fish were coming in from the Sea like this and then getting worse and worse, before dying of fungal infection.

From what I hear the incidents really tailed off as summer kicked in and a lot of fish with symptoms began to recover while in the river. This year maybe the low water at the same time has kept the temperature up and the disease down?

I’m not sure if anyone is any the wiser as to causes & transmission.
 

mows

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2 years ago at the Gannochy, was the first time I had saw fresh fish, straight from the sea go lie in with the diseased ones, when I could see no signs of disease. Normally they would only go in the eddy once fungus had set in. I wonder if it was red belly then, I just couldn't see it under the fish.
 

Westcountry

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I’m not sure if anyone is any the wiser as to causes & transmission.
As far as I know all results from the boffins came back with "nothing found".
It was noticeable that fish were showing freely in low water until the first rise in water in early May whereupon they all vanished and nothing showed at all. Since fishing has started nobody is seeing fish other than the ones they rise. It was the same last year with good catches but nothing showing. Tis a mystery.


Andy
 

Softlad

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I have some video 254 mb file though it is saying to large to upload , how can I show you the extent of the situation in The Leannan River, County Donegal, Ir.eland
 

Wee-Eck

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Softlad.
That looks more like Saprolegnia to me.
 
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mows

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Softlad.
That looks more like Saprolegnia to me.
Saproglenia is the secondary disease.
You would need to see the fish fresh to see if it started with red belly.

A sad but every day sight on the Northie every year, March to June.
Some years many 100s .
The last 2 years it seemed a bit different though!

I got back home too late in the season to see if red belly was a factor this year, and off course there was no fishing to see what the fresh fish looked like.
The pictures I saw of Feb and early March fish looked pristine with no sign of red belly.
 

Softlad

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Yes it is Saprolegnia but when they test it's secondary as you say to what they are calling RSD but this reminds me of the UDN outbreak in the 1970s, all seemingly under that umbrella
 
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mows

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Its distressing watching them, especially at the end when even the float blader isn't working correctly. Over here, it tends to clear up once the water warms up, though with the red belly it seemed to hang around a lot longer.
 

Wee-Eck

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Saprolegnia is also known as 'Winter Fungus' and is normally able to infect salmon in temperatures below 12 C as temperatures lower than that affect the fishes ability to produce mucus in freshwater allowing the spores to get under the scales or attack their fins. Where there is a pre-existing injury such as lice wounds, furunculosis or 'Redskin' then mucus is not going to protect these lesions in any case.
 
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