Pinks on the march

nickolas

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Is this a sign of pink salmon taking over our Atlantic salmon rivers, I’ve just heard that the catch in the lakselv is about 300, more concerning 2 rivers just round the corner have netted and trapped 10000 each to date. Why are these fish able to take over from the Atlantic salmon. Also king crab are on there way down the Norwegian coast, to give you an idea of numbers, 2 jumbo freighters a week are loaded up and shipped out. Are these two species just filling a vacuum.
 

iainmortimer

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Presumably it will be about a greater tolerance for conditions that Atlantic salmon struggle with possibly helped by their smaller size.
 

MCXFisher

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Ian Tennant at Gordon Castle told me that pinks don't conflict with Atlantics because they spawn in August much lower down the river, and as soon as the eggs hatch the fry go directly to sea. As a result the juveniles do not compete with parr for food. Nevertheless I am unwilling to welcome any invasive species on account of unknown consequences.
 

nickolas

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Maybe with a bit of gene editing and hybridization between the two it would be possible to get the best of both. Interesting that Norwegians seam to be so intent on trying to get rid of them unless of course the fish is being harvested as another form of food For the table.
 

paddymc

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Maybe with a bit of gene editing and hybridization between the two it would be possible to get the best of both. Interesting that Norwegians seam to be so intent on trying to get rid of them unless of course the fish is being harvested as another form of food For the table.
Hybridisation…no thanks.
 

GeeBee

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They are not taking over, they are just filling a man made gap.

One positive of them is that they all die and their bodies provide nutrition from the atlantic to parr and various bugs.

I would think that likewise their eggs and fry provide nutrition for adult trout and maybe sea trout ?
 

Woodsy

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Folks mother nature will sort it out, after all us humans have fecked up the earth since the start of the industrial revolution.
Mother nature hasn't sorted out grey squirrels, zebra mussels, NZ flatworm, Japanese knotweed, giant hogweed etc.

Pinks pose a major threat to our freshwater ecosystems
 

Birkin

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When we look back in time where we not an invasive species.?
Should Sea Trout be in South America along with sheep.?
Fly fishing for Bonito off the west coast of Sweden.?
 

happy days

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The greatest Atlantic salmon rivers in the world have large runs of pinks, 160,000 were netted in varzuga estuary 2017, if they ever populated Uk rivers which is unlikely in numbers surely they would reduce the weight of predation on our own fish, instead of handwringing over pinks look at the effect of intensive farming and effluent human and animal in our catchments
 

Tangled

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It's been covered loads by fisheries recently so I'm not getting into that.
I've read extensively about it and so far I can't find any real problems. That's not to say that there aren't any, just that if they exist, it's not obvious what they are. There's a lot of reasonable concern and a lot of unknowns but they are certainly not in the grey squirrel category of competitive invasion.
It's also worth saying that invasive species cost us tax payers hundreds of millions every year
But how does this apply to pinks?
 

GeeBee

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If you have the time to read it, this is a long interesting article on the species and their history in Europe :


Happy Days makes another good point - would you prefer the seals, hellbats and trawlers predate on Atlantics or Pinks ?

One of the main reasons for the impetus to reinstate the shad and herring runs of old is that salmonids and bass use the shoals to mask their migration into and out of fresh water. This is true on both sides of the Atlantic.
 

Woodsy

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I've read extensively about it and so far I can't find any real problems. That's not to say that there aren't any, just that if they exist, it's not obvious what they are. There's a lot of reasonable concern and a lot of unknowns but they are certainly not in the grey squirrel category of competitive invasion.

But how does this apply to pinks?
There are certainly a lot of unknowns I agree. There also unknowns after the introduction of every other invasive species.

Just think of how the pinks got here
 

Woodsy

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There be more salmon farm escapies , rainbow trout too , & goosanders are all more of a threat than ant pinky
Rainbows don't breed and surely we should be giving them Atlantic's every fighting chance and not add to risks they face
 

Tangled

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There are certainly a lot of unknowns I agree. There also unknowns after the introduction of every other invasive species.
But there's also an awful lot of knowns - and so far there's really nothing to say that there's a problem. The two species has co-existed in Russia for over 50 years. They don't seem to compete with or harm Atlantics.
Just think of how the pinks got here
They got here naturally, they're not introductions to our waters.
 

Woodsy

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But there's also an awful lot of knowns - and so far there's really nothing to say that there's a problem. The two species has co-existed in Russia for over 50 years. They don't seem to compete with or harm Atlantics.

They got here naturally, they're not introductions to our waters.
It seems these fish came from Russia, from an introduced population. That's not natural.
 

Tangled

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It seems these fish came from Russia, from an introduced population. That's not natural.
They were introduced into the White Sea (Below the Kola Peninsula) black in the 1960's. They've naturalised there. They are migrating here naturally. We're not introducing them ourselves, that's why we can't stop them.
 
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