Photography ? Anyone anyone know a good source to learn about dslrs

Rrrr

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As above, the wife wanted to learn to take photos so bought her an all singing all dancing cannon dslr a few years back. She gave up after finding it too much like hard work and that the camera on the phone gives decent results.
Now its sitting there i may aswel learn how to use it as ive got nowt better to do.
Anyone know any good youtube channels that will show me how this contraption works and how to get the best out of it ?
Cant really get out and practise but have the garden to use.

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Jockiescott

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Without sounding too much of know it all, DSLRs are pretty much the same at their basic level.

Learning about "the Holy trinity" of Aperture, Shutter speed and ISO is good to know when you want to achieve different types of photographs and can be used with any camera, even manual photography settings on your phone.

As for the specific camera, there must be plenty of YouTube videos and tutorials for it.

When I bought my DSLR 10 years ago, I bought the book, "Nikon D5000 for dummies". It was extremely helpful going through every sett the camera had in language even I could understand. I would be more than surprised if there wasn't one for your camera.

Sorry I can't be any more specific about actual videos or websites.
 

Rrrr

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Thankyou. Im starting from scratch really so want to learn the basics too. Her camera is a cannon and our wedding photographer said it was a good unit to start with but that was a couple of years back now.

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Jockiescott

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Thankyou. Im starting from scratch really so want to learn the basics too. Her camera is a cannon and our wedding photographer said it was a good unit to start with but that was a couple of years back now.

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As I said, mine is now 10 years old but still takes a decent photo. I'm sure the age of the camera will not matter. :)

Keep us posted on your progress!
 

gwelsher

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Her camera is a cannon and our wedding photographer said it was a good unit to start with but that was a couple of years back now.
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As JS says photography is all about the big 3. Understand those and you can concentrate on the composition of the picture.
Watch the YouTube videos, they are a great source of info and 1 picture is worth a thousand words.

I have had a succession of Canon DSLRs and am still a user of them now, her camera will still be absolutely fine unless you want to go professional. The manual that comes with it explains how to get at all the different settings but to start off all you need is select the Green A on the top dial and it is in fully auto mode. It will do a pretty good job of getting a balanced photo in most situations.
Also on the dial there are a series of little pictures that are specific settings for particular types of photos.
Portrait - Picture of a single person
Landscape - Pictures of landscapes funnily
Close Up - For sort of macro pictures
Sports - For fast moving pictures

Also on the dial are the the settings to go into the more techie side:
Tv - Shutter Priority. Use this when taking shots of fast moving things. Choose the speed you want and the camera sorts out the rest, the higher the number the faster the shutter opens and closes and less light comes in so the lower the Aperture number and/or ISO needs to be.. A rough guide is 1/100 for static scenes 1/500 for moving scenes and there are all the other settings above, below and between these numbers to try.
Av - Aperture Priority. This controls how wide the lens is open dictating how much light comes in. Choose the f stop you want and the camera sorts out the rest, the lower the number the less light comes in so the higher the Shutter speed and/or ISO needs to be. This is used in difficult lighting conditions. If it is low light but you want to have an open or to control the Depth of Field (DOF). DOF is the amount of the picture that is in focus. You will have seen photos where the foreground and background are out of focus but the strip containing the subject is in focus.
M - This is full manual where you set everything, apart from focus, how you want them. Difficult to get right without practice and experience.
There are some other settings on there which the manual tells you about.

There are loads of settings that you get to though the menu. It is worth going through these even if you don't want to change anything just to see the massive array of things you can control.

The camera is Auto Focus and generally will do a decent job by evening a out the focus across the picture. Sometimes though, wildlife o close up for instance, you might want concentrate on a specific part of the photo. this is where you would use Manual Focus which is a slide switch on the side of the lens barrel.

If the camera came with only one lens it will probably be something like a 18-55 zoom. This is a good starter and will cover all the tourist type photos. If you get into this lark you will probably start wanting extra lenses for zooming in on distant objects or macro for instance.

My advice would be to read the manual and watch all the videos but also to start blasting off pictures in Auto mode and see what results you get. You will then see the differences of Light/Shutter Speed/Focus etc and know watch questions to ask on here or YouTube/Google.

You don't need to be an expert but it is good to have an appreciation of Light. Because Light is what photography is all about and all these controls are means of manipulating the amount of it hitting the picture.
You can then spend more time thinking about the composition of the picture and what the light is doing to it.

My wife who mostly uses Auto takes far better "photos" than I do because she knows the basics but has a great eye for composition.

Hope this lot helps.
 

Tardyrover

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As above, the wife wanted to learn to take photos so bought her an all singing all dancing cannon dslr a few years back. She gave up after finding it too much like hard work and that the camera on the phone gives decent results.
Now its sitting there i may aswel learn how to use it as ive got nowt better to do.
Anyone know any good youtube channels that will show me how this contraption works and how to get the best out of it ?
Cant really get out and practise but have the garden to use.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
Maybe try adult learning college (when we get the all clear)
I did a coarse a few years back, 6 evenings Over 6 weeks. Digital photography for beginners . Was a very interesting coarse and learnt loads!
 
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Hardyreels

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Trade her something she will like for the camera. Once it is yours look to order something like this for yourself; > Cannon Field Guide

I have one of his books for my Nikon, far better than what is supplied by the manufacturer.
 

Tyke777

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A long distance shot

I dont know about DSLR but this is some photograph.
A thin line of Mountains rises over the Horizon: The Alps, with Barre des Écrins (4.102 m) in the middle left of the image.

A total Distance of 443 Kilometers by Mark Bret

Camera Panasonic Lumix FZ72 @ ISO100 – 1/250
Lens Integrated Zoom @ 1200 mm (equiv.) – f./2.8
Date July 16th 2016

Portraying the silhouette of the Barre des Ecrins from the most distant possible summit of the Pyrenees and getting a new World Distance Record.

The result is counted in the image: a view from Pic de Finestrelles (2.820 m.) to the Alps.

View attachment 43359
 
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Rrrr

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When i was a kid my dad bought a propper slr camera second hand with all the lenses etc from a camera shop for a trip we went on to kenya. There was an issue with it and when we got home and he got them developed they are all bluured he was ****** and took it back and the guy repaired it and i dont think it seen the light of day again.

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One thing about digital vs film is that it costs nothing to take a photo on digital (not always a plus, IMO, as it's easy to take thousands of rubbish pictures)- so just experiment to your heart's content. The information accompanying each photo should tell you the settings you used.
 

Hardyreels

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The book I recommended, I have one for my old Nikon D-80 and use of the book unlocked the camera for me. I can't imagine learning from you tube, I carry my book in a document pouch that is part of my Tamron photo bag and often need reference while using the camera. I learned a great deal from it and that is how I got many of the pictures I've posted here over the years. I had 25 years of SLR use under my belt when I got the digital SLR and can tell you that as soon as the manual started talking about 'White Balance' I was at a loss. Ordering the expanded field guide dedicated to my model camera was the trick.

From this.....



To this....



That book was how I figured out how to do it with the digital SLR
 

Rrrr

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Just spent the afternoon finding the charger for the thing as the wife had managed to misplace it.
All charged up now and found the diffrent lenses too. The cameras a cannon eos 1300d which means absoloutley nothing to me so far . Going to read the manual over the weekend and see how far i get.

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clydesider

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Best way to learn is get an expert, paid if necessary, to do one on one. Hard to learn to cast from a book or Youtube, same with photography.
Mike
 

Hardyreels

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Just spent the afternoon finding the charger for the thing as the wife had managed to misplace it.
All charged up now and found the diffrent lenses too. The cameras a cannon eos 1300d which means absoloutley nothing to me so far . Going to read the manual over the weekend and see how far i get.

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If it reads like Greek then maybe consider a Field Guide type like I linked. The only reason that Aurora shot shows hot spots is that I am too dam cheap to buy a faster wide angle lens. When you get a good field guide you will learn what I mean by "faster".

I was good with my manual film SLR cameras but there were things to learn with regard to the transition to digi and reading was the key for me.
 

Beel

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I would second what has been said before, learn the ISO, aperture and speed triangle.
I have used the EOS magazine series for my camera and the canon processing software.
Getting started with your EOS 1300D eBook
Above link to the relevant guide.
One thing I would encourage is the use of "back button focusing" especially with moving objects, takes a bit of getting used to, but worth persevering with. The best advice I could give would be to just get out and use the camera as much as possible, try and get away from manual mode as quickly as possible and enjoy!!
 

Rrrr

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I would second what has been said before, learn the ISO, aperture and speed triangle.
I have used the EOS magazine series for my camera and the canon processing software.
Getting started with your EOS 1300D eBook
Above link to the relevant guide.
One thing I would encourage is the use of "back button focusing" especially with moving objects, takes a bit of getting used to, but worth persevering with. The best advice I could give would be to just get out and use the camera as much as possible, try and get away from manual mode as quickly as possible and enjoy!!
Was fiddling on with it this morning as it happens as watched a video on adjusting iso for moving objects and also which ever it is that makes photos lighter and darker. That book looks a good idea as i can keep it on my phone and tablet. Cheers.

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Hardyreels

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I see you are moving along with the learning :) I did not get technical in earlier posts and will not do so here but.....Pictures that I have posted here on the forum were almost always shot using a few simple tricks for we amateurs; I generally keep iso at 400 - set the E/V at -1 or -1.5 and I shoot in aperture mode.

Reasons for my ways are as follows: iso 400 will still yield a good image while being fast enough to allow lowed light requirements. The E/V settings = exposure value which in plain talk means that if you shoot at -1.5 for instance on a bright day you can avoid there being too much light resulting in an over exposure of a one time shot. If your picture is a bit under exposed (dark) you can lighten many images digitally to correct this however once an image is burned - blasted by too much light they are usually a lost cause.

Finally, shooting in aperture priority mode allows you to watch the shutter speed change up or down as you select the aperture size (depth of field) and depending on the lens you can generally shoot hand held images down to a shutter speed of 80 for most. Those decent pictures of the Great Gray Owl I posted in the gallery a week ago were all done the was I have described although I used a tripod for the 300 mm lens shots. Once the owl went to flight I had to quickly open that aperture and shoot hand held at 125.

Someday that'll all make sense :)
 
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