My first post- intro and question about september

Spannulman

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Hello, I have been a lurker for some time but not posted before.

New to Salmon but not to fly fishing. Bought a 2nd hand 15’ set up last October after becoming hooked after a day on the Spey with a local ghillie. Didn’t catch a fish but did see a lot splashing about. Have now had a few days out but mostly learning to cast with the hope of a fish.

I spent most of the winter buying flies of every type and hue, but have only Fished with dunkeld wee doubles ( on local advice) so my boxes of are much handled but remain unused.

A question to others if I may? My big birthday trip to the tirol next month may not be possible due to the obvious. If I can find accomodation in Scotland can anyone suggest the best river for an inexperienced salmon fisherman to try for his first fish? I have details of several beats on the tweed which I’m told is good at the back end but don’t know much about the Tay, Spey or others. can anyone suggest a good area to try for?

any advice much appreciated.
 

Oscar

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Hi, and welome aboard!

I think in your position I would try and either head for a beat with a good ghillie, or invest in at least a day or two with a guide on a river wich has a few back end fish. The river I would say is somewhat secondary to the ability to have some guidance, otherwise you run the risk of flogging water and getting demoralised. Some rivers to try could include the North/South Esk, the Don, Dee, Tweed (££), Spey (££), Tay or Deveron. Pretty much an endless choice!

I know a very amiable guide called Bill Cottle - http://www.egsscotland.co.uk/site/index.php - he used to run guided weeks on the Don, but I'm pretty sure he will travel anywhere to provide tuition/advice. He has good knowledge of Scotland and I'm sure if you called him could impart some useful advice.

If you're keen just to go it alone, I'd take a good look through Hugh Falkus' book 'Salmon Fishing' and have a browse through our very own MCX Fishers' blogs on 'Just One Week':


Hope you manage to get something sorted.

Oscar.
 

MCXFisher

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Welcome to the Forum, where you will find all manner of wit, wisdom and all else besides. Always keep a sense of humour and a thick skin :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Whereabouts do you live?
 
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Occasional salmon fisher

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Welcome to the forum. lots of rivers should have fish in September although autumn runs in recent years have been fairly poor on many rivers so you may be looking for fish which have been in the river a bit.

One consideration might be your casting abilities. It will be much easier to cover most of the fish on a smaller river. Rivers such as the lower Tay and Tweed are quite wide and quite a long cast to cover the water(although there will be pools where fish lie closer in). Particularly on a windy day.

I know when I started I found big, wide rivers quite intimidating and felt that I couldn't cover the water properly.
 

flytay

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Welcome.

Be careful as salmon fishing can be highly addictive as I have discovered!

As a regular Tweed fisher, I can tell you that the problem with fishing the Tweed in September is that the autumn run has been virtually non existent in the last few years. Whilst the cost has come down to reflect this, the fishing still tends to be expensive particularly on the beats where you are most likely to catch fish. As a novice, this may not be the best way to spend your hard earned cash. Somewhere like Horncliffe on the lower Tweed is worth trying and has an excellent ghillie called Tony Averil. The cost is £135 + VAT for a day in September.

I would also recommend Newtyle on the Tay. The excellent ghillie called Andy Gunn is very good with beginners. He was really helpful when I was starting out. The cost in September is £110.

Both these beats can be booked through Fishpal and have availability in September.

Hope that helps.

Flytay
 

lefthandup

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Welcome.

Be careful as salmon fishing can be highly addictive as I have discovered!

As a regular Tweed fisher, I can tell you that the problem with fishing the Tweed in September is that the autumn run has been virtually non existent in the last few years. Whilst the cost has come down to reflect this, the fishing still tends to be expensive particularly on the beats where you are most likely to catch fish. As a novice, this may not be the best way to spend your hard earned cash. Somewhere like Horncliffe on the lower Tweed is worth trying and has an excellent ghillie called Tony Averil. The cost is £135 + VAT for a day in September.

I would also recommend Newtyle on the Tay. The excellent ghillie called Andy Gunn is very good with beginners. He was really helpful when I was starting out. The cost in September is £110.

Both these beats can be booked through Fishpal and have availability in September.

Hope that helps.

Flytay
Still way way too expensive on the Tweed....day rods should be around £70 per day ,if you are paying more it's a rip off.
 

simonjh98

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Still way way too expensive on the Tweed....day rods should be around £70 per day ,if you are paying more it's a rip off.
That's mad how dear that is for a single day, 135+vat!! Our club is £60 a year for 32 miles of water on the Foyle System here in Northwest Ireland.
 

lefthandup

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That's mad how dear that is for a single day, 135+vat!! Our club is £60 a year for 32 miles of water on the Foyle System here in Northwest Ireland.
If there is any river that priced the working man out of Salmon fishing it's the Tweed.
 

MCXFisher

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Welcome to the forum. lots of rivers should have fish in September although autumn runs in recent years have been fairly poor on many rivers so you may be looking for fish which have been in the river a bit.

One consideration might be your casting abilities. It will be much easier to cover most of the fish on a smaller river. Rivers such as the lower Tay and Tweed are quite wide and quite a long cast to cover the water(although there will be pools where fish lie closer in). Particularly on a windy day.

I know when I started I found big, wide rivers quite intimidating and felt that I couldn't cover the water properly.

This is very good advice.

If you live in England the Tyne or the Ure might be better answers to your question on the grounds of manageable size, a good chance of a fish, lower cost and reduced travelling time. The Tyne in September is as good a place as anywhere to catch an autumn salmon.
 

Markymac

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Hi welcome to the forum. If your looking for cheaper fishing some of the association waters are well worth days tickets. The Thurso, Helmsdale, Findhorn for example all have great associations
 

flytay

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If there is any river that priced the working man out of Salmon fishing it's the Tweed.
As I mentioned in my post, the prices on the Tweed are still too expensive. Most of my fishing is on syndicate waters at a much more reasonable cost and I benefit from being local. It is more difficult for the travelling angler regardless of whether he is a working man or not!!
 

lefthandup

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Hello, I have been a lurker for some time but not posted before.

New to Salmon but not to fly fishing. Bought a 2nd hand 15’ set up last October after becoming hooked after a day on the Spey with a local ghillie. Didn’t catch a fish but did see a lot splashing about. Have now had a few days out but mostly learning to cast with the hope of a fish.

I spent most of the winter buying flies of every type and hue, but have only Fished with dunkeld wee doubles ( on local advice) so my boxes of are much handled but remain unused.

A question to others if I may? My big birthday trip to the tirol next month may not be possible due to the obvious. If I can find accomodation in Scotland can anyone suggest the best river for an inexperienced salmon fisherman to try for his first fish? I have details of several beats on the tweed which I’m told is good at the back end but don’t know much about the Tay, Spey or others. can anyone suggest a good area to try for?

any advice much appreciated.
There should be available rods on the Spey in September but it's well past its best by then....
Check out Lower Pavillion on the Tweed for decent value and accomodation almost on the bankside at Melrose. ;-)

Sorry...I just noticed the price hike ?
 

Sprintavoj

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The Cree in Newton Stewart has very well priced day tickets and can be booked via Fishpal for £25.00 a day. I've been fishing there in September for the last 16 years and, although the runs aren't what they used to be in the autumn, you're always in with a good chance given good water conditions. One of the advantages can be the fact that their water includes right down to the tidal stretches.

If catching a salmon is the main thing that matters, be prepared to break out the "egg beater" as well !!

Hope this helps, Paul. (y)
 

Spannulman

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Wow! what a great response. Thank you all for your advice. I’m a little overwhelmed by how helpful and welcoming you have been.
With the news this morning that visiting Austria will require quarantine the risk of further restrictions made the decision for us and we have cancelled. A shame as I have been looking forward to it and I had an outing arranged with the local jagdverband. But next year perhaps.

we found one of the last holiday lets in Scotland still available that wasn’t £2500 for a two bed cottage and have booked a week in Duns, in the borders. i Spoke with Ian at the borders gun room who was super helpful too and I have a plan. The beats some of you have mentioned look likely. It isn’t cheap but they come with a ghillie and it is a special birthday so I will enjoy it. Plus the Whiteadder association water is great value, like most ’town water’ tickets and I will try there too.

i spoke to the owner of a beat in the middle tweed at Christmas who said the river seems to be changing and the autumn is less fruitful than it used to be but their beat in summer has done well recently when it used to be quiet midsummer. I need to learn so much still.
im now going to be watching met forecast and the gauge on fish pal and then take a punt at a day/ beat and see what happens. I will take the spinning rod too. I enjoy The casting now I am not lashing the water so much and trying too hard. Once you find the rythym it is very peaceful but I don’t mind dragging a Toby either.

l will now spend some time in the ‘no such thing as a stupid question’ section and see how much I don’t know. Thanks again for your help and support for the new boy.
 

Spannulman

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That's mad how dear that is for a single day, 135+vat!! Our club is £60 a year for 32 miles of water on the Foyle System here in Northwest Ireland.

That sounds great. I spent some time at Sion mills when I was younger but wasn’t able to do any fishing then. I did consider it for this trip but found the place in Scotland This morning. I am due a trip across the water for work which was cancelled due to the obvious so may look at combining it with a bit of fishing. I forget it isn’t just scotland that has salmon fishing. The Tyne sounds good too.
 

lefthandup

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Wow! what a great response. Thank you all for your advice. I’m a little overwhelmed by how helpful and welcoming you have been.
With the news this morning that visiting Austria will require quarantine the risk of further restrictions made the decision for us and we have cancelled. A shame as I have been looking forward to it and I had an outing arranged with the local jagdverband. But next year perhaps.

we found one of the last holiday lets in Scotland still available that wasn’t £2500 for a two bed cottage and have booked a week in Duns, in the borders. i Spoke with Ian at the borders gun room who was super helpful too and I have a plan. The beats some of you have mentioned look likely. It isn’t cheap but they come with a ghillie and it is a special birthday so I will enjoy it. Plus the Whiteadder association water is great value, like most ’town water’ tickets and I will try there too.

i spoke to the owner of a beat in the middle tweed at Christmas who said the river seems to be changing and the autumn is less fruitful than it used to be but their beat in summer has done well recently when it used to be quiet midsummer. I need to learn so much still.
im now going to be watching met forecast and the gauge on fish pal and then take a punt at a day/ beat and see what happens. I will take the spinning rod too. I enjoy The casting now I am not lashing the water so much and trying too hard. Once you find the rythym it is very peaceful but I don’t mind dragging a Toby either.

l will now spend some time in the ‘no such thing as a stupid question’ section and see how much I don’t know. Thanks again for your help and support for the new boy.
If you are staying in Duns, the Berwick and district angling association is perfect for you at £30 a day... especially if there's water in.
 

Spannulman

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I’ve swallowed hard and booked a day at Rutherford on the Tweed. Am very excited but the news from fish pal that 230 fish have been caught this week on the river is now piling on pressure. A helpful friend says it’s now for me to stuff it up!

my concern is hooking. Until I catch my first fish I won’t really understand how they take, and am used to striking as with trout. I’m sure the ghillie will put me straight. I’ve missed loads of pike on the fly by striking too early but then you can see their open mouths-that won’t be the case with salmon.
 

westie4566

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I’ve swallowed hard and booked a day at Rutherford on the Tweed. Am very excited but the news from fish pal that 230 fish have been caught this week on the river is now piling on pressure. A helpful friend says it’s now for me to stuff it up!

my concern is hooking. Until I catch my first fish I won’t really understand how they take, and am used to striking as with trout. I’m sure the ghillie will put me straight. I’ve missed loads of pike on the fly by striking too early but then you can see their open mouths-that won’t be the case with salmon.
Just to ramp up your excitement a bit more, Rutherford have had 30 fish so far this week and not including today!!
Tight lines for your trip.
 

Jack Holroyd

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The best bet for me in the autumn is N Esk , if you can find a rod. The South is also good.
Lower Spey and lower Tay are great but very expensive. Other rivers include Teith, Orchy, Ness, Doon and Earn.
The best beats are booked well in advance , but you may be lucky.
tight lines.
 

Rennie

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Spannulman, the thing you DON'T do is to strike at a Salmon.They need a little time to take and turn on the fly!.Simply fish with the rod hanging by your side from your dominate side/hand, with the tip very close to the water and guide the fly round as it swings in the current with the rod tip.Like as not you wont see Salmon take the fly, all being well you'll feel any thing from a snatch to an at times vicious pull, this will set the reel spinning as it pulls line off the reel.When this happens, raise the rod firmly and purposely and as the rod tip gets high in the air ( 45deg or above!) clamp up on the reel and hold tight and lean back for moment or two, not giving line initially.
Let the fish pull on the weight and bend of the rod and you, as it wakes up and wants to run off, allow line to be taken under controlled resistance.Make the fish work to take line and allways keep the line tight and the rod well bent.If you have a reel with a modern drag system, set it so the current can't pull line from the reel, but the fish can. Retrieve line when you can, but allow the fish to run if it is determined.You can apply pressure to the reel rim with your hand to slow the reel a little more.
All you need to concentrate on is keeping upright on your feet and keep the line tight at all times and the rod well bent.
As the fish settles slowly begin to edge in to the bank and work Salar ever closer to you.
If the Ghillie is there he'll advise and help and land the fish with you.IF on your own, another Angler might help if you ask!.
If completely alone, don't panic, the fish will dictate the early stages , but as it tires you'll exert more control and begin to guide Salar where you want it to go!.
Forget nets unless you've no choice!, look for a shallow clear of obstacles bit of water where you can encourage the fish into where you can beach it or at least gets its head onto dry land.Slowly work yourself and Salar to that point. It will help no end towards the final stages if you encourage the fish to swim slightly above and upstream of you by steering it with the rod point, keeping the line tight take two steps downstream and keep the rod point pointing up stream and the line tight.This will unbalance Salar and make the job much easier getting it on the beach as it'll have to fight the current and you and the rod.
As the line ever shortens, get onto dry land and retrieve line untill the last few feet of fly line is outside the rod tip, walk back if you can slowly and encourage the fish onto the dry land, always keeping the line tight and the rod bent, if the fish wants to go let it, don't pull and panic, encourage it to swim in and it won't create on you any where near as much! it will flop over eventually when its belly hits the bottom and you can walk up to it keeping the line tight all the time and grab the fish slightly just above the tail.Now you'll be able to deal with it and the rest is up to you.
Of course, this is if everything go's to plan, but thats most of the fun. Believe you me, you will be struck by nerves and will egg your self. But the rush afterwards, WOW!, enjoy that special moment!
Best of luck, Pedro.
 

MCXFisher

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You will love Rutherford, which is one of the prettiest beats on the Tweed and importantly for you, it doesn't require you to be a Spey casting ninja to enjoy it. Michael Farr the head boatman (aka ghillie, but boatman is the Tweed term) will give you all the help you need: just let him know that you're a novice and would much appreciate his assistance. He's a lovely chap with great sense of humour and knows his water in minute detail.

Don't forget to show appropriate gratitude and tip especially generously if you get a fish (it will buy you good luck for next time!).
 

MCXFisher

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Don't worry about striking. As Rennie says above, salmon generally hook themselves. What you feel as a 'take' is actually the first kick of the tail when the salmon tuns away and feels constrained by the tension of your line. That motion itself will put the hook most of the way home. Just don't do anything hasty or overly forceful: follow Rennie's excellent advice.
 

Spannulman

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Thank you all, especially Rennie for your helpful explanation of the practicalities. I know nerves will kick in but hopefully the boatman will be to hand.

i am reaching my half century that week ( if the Lord spares me) so have raided the piggy bank and booked a day shooting over pointers as well but hope to fit in some fishing on the whiteadder. The assistance of a ghillie is invaluable, especially to a new boy like me but I find I do like fishing on my own and not feeling any pressure.

Again, I must say how helpful members on here have been. It is really good To feel welcomed and offered helpful advice.thank you.
 
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