Mini Scandi

Grassy_Knollington

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2 shameless attempts to scale down Rotenone’s Scandi creations:

Fox wing Sierra Korva variants tied with a cone body & soft grizzle Hackle.

3988563F-5809-4F24-8D47-530519E85F51.jpeg

Very loose Banana variants, with a Black Zonker wing and olive/ dirty yellow soft Hackle tied on cone head bodies.

135B51D8-110C-475D-AE97-1A5E7EDF2381.jpeg
 

Hardyreels

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Would these be considered good offerings during June and early July on your rivers from Northern Scotland and many points south from there?

I have many flies of this style that I use here for steelhead and rainbow trout but just may be fishing your rivers in 2020 so I'm asking :)

Thanks,

Ard
 

speers

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weight of fly to height is the key, however from may onwards we cauught most of the fish on small cone heads. it depends on where you are fishing, or planning to fish in scotland, this year we had mostly high water.
 

Grassy_Knollington

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Would these be considered good offerings during June and early July on your rivers from Northern Scotland and many points south from there?

I have many flies of this style that I use here for steelhead and rainbow trout but just may be fishing your rivers in 2020 so I'm asking :)

Thanks,

Ard
If I’m honest Ard, while I love tying them, these are a wee bit big for me unless the river is at a ‘good’ height, hence me trying to scale them down. Although I’m sure the soft Hackle will really slim down in the water and they won’t look so stumpy.

Depending on water height and temp, you’ll find folk fishing anything down to #14 (or lower in low water) and 1/4” or micro tubes.

As Speers says, speed is the key and I think they may do ok fished squarer and faster than I would normally do. I’ve also been tying on cone bodies to try and get a fly that can get into their faces quickly in tight lies.

So much if this game is confidence in what we are fishing. That usually means we go with our tried and trusted methods.

If I were faced with a river at, or a couple of inches above summer height to achieve the same effect and that ‘eel-like’ profile Rotenone talks of; I might start off with something long, but with less bulk. This the same length as the top fly above - 4cm.

3A5BCDA4-A1FC-4F7A-BEB8-603AFFD37BE0.jpeg

The best thing is, any other 10 fishermen could give you 10 different responses😀😀
 

Rennie

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GK, I'm loving this style of flee a lot.I too am trying to downsize, but finding it a hard task indeed.Most of the flee's I use are 10 down to 16 on dressed hooks, but for a few seasons I've been using tubes from 1/2" down to 1/4" or even less.
Not only is the size an issue, but the overall bulk to the dressing.I'm still trying to keep the movement inherrant in the dressing but keeping to an overall smaller dimension.Of course it helps no end having Sausages for fingers and being a **** flee tyer!
Pedro.
 

Jockiescott

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GK, I'm loving this style of flee a lot.I too am trying to downsize, but finding it a hard task indeed.Most of the flee's I use are 10 down to 16 on dressed hooks, but for a few seasons I've been using tubes from 1/2" down to 1/4" or even less.
Not only is the size an issue, but the overall bulk to the dressing.I'm still trying to keep the movement inherrant in the dressing but keeping to an overall smaller dimension.Of course it helps no end having Sausages for fingers and being a **** flee tyer!
Pedro.
Just a thought about bulk on these tiny tube. I don't particularly like very small tubes as I find it impossible to keep bulk down. I wonder would something along the lines of a waddington type shank help keep the bulk down?

I should have a wire forming tool for flying c making somewhere. I wonder if I could form a very small shank from a flying c wire that might help to keep the bulk down?

I might just go and look for the wire forming tool and give it a go. :)
 

Jockiescott

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Well I just had to give it a go!

IMG_20191223_194910.jpg

I'll continue to experiment in the next few days.
 
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Grassy_Knollington

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Looking great JS! What might work well are the Senyo articulated shanks, they go pretty small.

If you Tie on Tube liner and forget about any body you can get pretty small, with soft materials, the fly should slim down in the water. I might try that tonight.
 

Loxie

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Just a thought about bulk on these tiny tube. I don't particularly like very small tubes as I find it impossible to keep bulk down. I wonder would something along the lines of a waddington type shank help keep the bulk down?

I should have a wire forming tool for flying c making somewhere. I wonder if I could form a very small shank from a flying c wire that might help to keep the bulk down?

I might just go and look for the wire forming tool and give it a go. :)
The other way is to embrace a bit of bulk. I love a snaelda tied on a .25" copper tube.
 

Jockiescott

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The other way is to embrace a bit of bulk. I love a snaelda tied on a .25" copper tube.
I don't really mind a bit of bulk for depth and I use bottle tubes to get down quickly in low water. Closer to the surface though, I prefer a slim profile.

I completely understand that the fish don't care but just me overthinking as usual. :redface:
 

Rennie

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I'm currently trying WD 40 extension tube(its red and very thin diameter overall, but reasonably thick walled), I've got loads from work as it usually gets chucked away(I'll heartily deny "nicking" any from the tins on the shelves at B+Q).I've not got it right yet, it's work in progress!
Pedro.
 

Grassy_Knollington

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Ok, smallest so far, a Dee Sheepish. Not sure I can go much smaller without getting rid of the cone. JS I would have used a black cone for the head but don’t have any ;). The rabbit looks thick but that definitely will slim down in the watter. #10 ED for ref.

90FB955D-98EB-4F6B-8451-E1C57E056980.jpeg

Tube: 1.8mm liner
Body: Sean Stanton XS silver cone
Underwing: Fox hair with yellow Krystal Flash
Wing: Rabbit zonker in black, hair only, no skin
Hackle 1: Golden yellow soft tips, tied as beard
Hackle 2: Ostrich hackle tips rich blue, tied as beard
Cheeks: JC
Head: Sean Stanton XS conehead flouro Red.
Hook: #12 Fulling Mill tube double

One without a cone body, same pattern less 1 sparse turn of Litebrite, hook is a #14 Kamasan B990:

25CB4F22-0BB7-4224-AED7-9E21968D3EB4.jpeg
 
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Loxie

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I don't really mind a bit of bulk for depth and I use bottle tubes to get down quickly in low water. Closer to the surface though, I prefer a slim profile.

I completely understand that the fish don't care but just me overthinking as usual. :redface:
I think any real salmon angler ought to overthink fly selection if only to instil confidence, however transitory.
 

Jockiescott

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Ok, smallest so far, a Dee Sheepish. Not sure I can go much smaller without getting rid of the cone. JS I would have used a black cone for the head but don’t have any ;). The rabbit looks thick but that definitely will slim down in the watter. #10 ED for ref.

View attachment 41379

Tube: 1.8mm liner
Body: Sean Stanton XS silver cone
Underwing: Fox hair with yellow Krystal Flash
Wing: Rabbit zonker in black, hair only, no skin
Hackle 1: Golden yellow soft tips, tied as beard
Hackle 2: Ostrich hackle tips rich blue, tied as beard
Cheeks: JC
Head: Sean Stanton XS conehead flouro Red.
Hook: #12 Fulling Mill tube double

One without a cone body, same pattern less 1 sparse turn of Litebrite, hook is a #14 Kamasan B990:

View attachment 41380
I prefer the one with the Treble and it has nothing to do with the cone! :lol: It seems the more sparse of the two and would be the one I'd tie on first of the two. :D

Really nicely proportioned for such a small size.
 

Lamson v10

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Ok, smallest so far, a Dee Sheepish. Not sure I can go much smaller without getting rid of the cone. JS I would have used a black cone for the head but don’t have any ;). The rabbit looks thick but that definitely will slim down in the watter. #10 ED for ref.

View attachment 41379

Tube: 1.8mm liner
Body: Sean Stanton XS silver cone
Underwing: Fox hair with yellow Krystal Flash
Wing: Rabbit zonker in black, hair only, no skin
Hackle 1: Golden yellow soft tips, tied as beard
Hackle 2: Ostrich hackle tips rich blue, tied as beard
Cheeks: JC
Head: Sean Stanton XS conehead flouro Red.
Hook: #12 Fulling Mill tube double

One without a cone body, same pattern less 1 sparse turn of Litebrite, hook is a #14 Kamasan B990:

View attachment 41380
Stunning wee fly's GK 👍🏻🎣. Will definitely be coping them when I get back at the vice
 

Rennie

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As an addition to the thread, I have it in mind that in this instance certainly, the hook is impacting on the flee's overall presence (I get these rushes of thought every once in a while) and maybe it should be considered as an overall part of the dressing.For a flee with less impact, choice of style/make/type of hook could be considered?.Any idea's or considerations?
Pedro.
 

Hardyreels

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On small and large tubes of this type I have taken to using what could be considered a small single hook having a ball eye. After having observed some ties that I was sure would bring fish while they were in transit underwater I changed my hooks and dressings. The results were rather instant with steelhead caught. The steelhead is as close as we get in the Pacific North West fisheries to a fish with habits similar to the Atlantic Salmon.

They return to natal rivers (steelhead) after living at sea and they winter over in those rivers. They eat and they seek sheltered lies and return to sea after spawning. They are also somewhat rare to catch and leave little margin for error for the angler.
 
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