Kola river 2020

SOS

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I don't think GS can survive full salt water so that isn't a problem. I think it can be spread by wildfowl and that could be very serious.

The big problem with GS is its a very slow burn. It can take 10 years before parasite levels reach a point where they cause mortality, then suddenly all the parr die. By this time it will likely have been spread far and wide. There is no cure, the only way is to poison the whole river and start again. I'm sure our Norwegian correspondents will tell us how hard it is in practice to eliminate.
I think it is and was very irresponsible to poison a whole river system at the detriment of maybe thousands of species just to save one or two species of fish.It has to be remembered that the vast majority of people dont really care about Salmon or fishing, but many might care about birds,insects,plants or animals that rely on the rivers,so i think that most people (me included) would be against the poisoning of any rivers.
It is the responsibility of any fishers going abroad to fish or any coming here to make sure their gear is clean.
If febs can indeed spread G.S. then there is another reason why they should be culled.
The best cure for G.S. is prevention.
 

Loxie

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I think it is and was very irresponsible to poison a whole river system at the detriment of maybe thousands of species just to save one or two species of fish.It has to be remembered that the vast majority of people dont really care about Salmon or fishing, but many might care about birds,insects,plants or animals that rely on the rivers,so i think that most people (me included) would be against the poisoning of any rivers.
It is the responsibility of any fishers going abroad to fish or any coming here to make sure their gear is clean.
If febs can indeed spread G.S. then there is another reason why they should be culled.
The best cure for G.S. is prevention.
Totally agree but it could allready be here. Then what?
 

SOS

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Then this is another reason for the use of hatcheries as a back up to disasters such as this.
 

Loxie

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Then this is another reason for the use of hatcheries as a back up to disasters such as this.
I believe this is what they did in Norway. Hopefully one of our excellent Norwegian experts will give us the accurate details but I think the procedure is to net adult fish coming in to the river for broodstock, rotenone the river killing all the fish, then restocking with hatchery fish. I think it's not quite that simple because of the brackish water thing.

There is no doubt that keeping it out is much, much better all round. It is difficult to overstate the scale of the disaster if we got it here. I was part of a CEFAS working group modelling the spread and impact of various infectious diseases, including VHS, IPN and GS. Any GS outbreak in the U.K. will most likely be catestrophic.
 

charlieH

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I think it is and was very irresponsible to poison a whole river system at the detriment of maybe thousands of species just to save one or two species of fish.
As I understand it, the only way to get rid of Gs is to poison the river, because other fish can carry the parasite but not be killed by it. I suppose you might be able (assuming you can afford it) to run a river along the lines of the East and West Rangas, reliant entirely on a ranching system, but otherwise I fear you can't have Gs and a viable wild salmon fishery.

However, it's also worth mentioning that while early efforts to eradicate Gs relied on poisoning a river with Rotenone, which kills everything, more recently the Norwegians have been using an aluminium compound (I think), which is much less toxic to other living things, so its impact may be less than you suggest.

Then this is another reason for the use of hatcheries as a back up to disasters such as this.

I agree with you that this is a situation where hatcheries can be of value. A few years ago I attended a debate on the subject of hatcheries at the Flyfishers' Club in London. When the debate was opened to the floor after the principal speeches, I made the point that hatcheries can be of use in a situation where it might be necessary to preserve an indigenous stock. The Vosso is another example - although it doesn't have Gs, not only has its indigenous run has been reduced to pitiful levels, largely as a result of fish farms in the fjord, but it also has to contend with very large numbers of hatchery escapees from those farms which will inevitably interbreed and pollute the genetics of the river's very slow-maturing (and hence very large) fish.

The late Malcolm Greenhalgh was opposing hatcheries in the debate, and to my surprise his response was that in his view hatcheries didn't even have a place in preserving an indigenous stock. He was basically opposed to them in all circumstances, and said he believed that it was better to allow the stock to rebuild naturally, however long that might take.
 
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Barentssalmon

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1. Gyrodactylus is a freshwater parasite that do NOT survive in marine/salt water. It survives and spread mostly attached to host fish, not/hardly as a parasite only. In can survive for some time in brackish water, the longer the more fresh the water is.
2. It is not all other salmonids that act as host fish. It seems that rainbow trout and Arctic char are the two other species in addition to A salmon that works as spreading hosts. In freshwater taht is.
3. Norway has struggled with gyro for 40 years, and we now see the end of the plague, and the last decade has seen a number of successful projects to eradicate the parasite. Currently, around 10 GBP is spent annually on treatment programs. It is a mix of chemical treatment and gene bank programs (not traditional hatchery practices directly, but science based keeping of live wild fish, as well as frozen material) that is used. As said, rotenone has been used in a number of rivers, but also aluminum addressing the parasite and not the host. Now cheap, seemingly effective and parasite-specific chlorine treatment is being developed as well.
4. recently, Norway has declared legendary rivers such as Vefsna (2017) and Rauma (1 November!!!) free of the parasite. Fishing is picking up fast, initially by stocking of eggs and fry from gene bank material, after an initial reestablishment period, natural recruitment is the norm.
5. The biggest tragedy of gyro in Kola river, Russia, is not its potential spread to UK/GB (or Norway for that matter), but to the loss RUssians and all us loving RUssian salmon and fishing will experience.
6. Spreading of gyro is primarily by infected fish. There is no evidence that anglers have spread gyro by their equipment, ever, in Norway. But it is still adviced from precautionary principles to disinfect, also to stop other diseases, which anglers might spread more easily. Fish, boats and kayaks, are more likely than a fishing reel...
 

Tangled

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Snow reports for the Kola Peninsula are very good this winter, looks like there'll be plenty of water in the rivers this summer (unlike 2018 which was a disaster).



With the holidays now behind us and the new year progressing, we can report that in contrast to the mild, wet and windy weather that has been the norm across the UK and much of continental Europe, the conditions on the northern tundra have been cold with good amounts of snow fall thus far. For now, the ice continues to build on the rivers and nature is working its magic to bring about another generation of fabulous ASR salmon.



As you can see on the Weather Page there is currently a snow depth of 91cm which is only 10cm lower than the 20 year high that occurred back in February 2017. The snow blanket is currently holding 232mm of water which equates to 25% less than the record amount at this time in 2017 yet 36% more water than this period last year. Whilst the snow depth frequently remains relatively static during the February to April period, with fresh falls tending to compact the blanket rather than increase its depth, the water in the blanket should continue to climb during the next 3 months before the May thaw commences. Stay tuned to the website for next update.

Although the winter snow and ice levels have been encouraging so far, we shouldn't read too much into the statistics at this point, especially considering the high numbers of salmon released per angler during the previous two low water seasons. However it is worth noting that three of the best seasons looking back historically coincided with the highest years water in the snow blanket in the preceding winter.



In camp at present, the team have just returned from changing over the winter security personnel that have been looking the camps since the end the season in September. This policy of staffing camps through the winter months in order to keep watch on the rivers is part of our longstanding commitment to protect the security of the salmon stocks during the spawning season. You may recall that 2013 saw the introduction of dedicated coastal patrols designed to protect the stocks that return from the ocean feeding grounds. This continues to be an ongoing commitment with similar patrols in 2020 which are scheduled to commence long before the ice melts and the rivers open up - and run right the way through the fishing season.



Our regular guests will know that last season's program was disrupted across the Northern Kola rivers, including ASR, due to military restrictions that occurred at short notice. We have been engaged in extensive and productive discussions with the various regional authorities at a senior level in an attempt to ensure that we minimise the risk of such short notice disruptions in the future. Whilst the camps remain in the restricted zone, these discussions have given us optimism that the situation will return to a more normal program of fishing and consents for western guests going forward. We have been encouraged to submit the formal request for consent to the 2020 season's program to the normal authorities and we anticipate receiving an official response to this shortly.

Whilst both Kharlovka and Rynda camps are now substantially booked for the coming season, the New Year often sees a handful of openings become available as some guests are forced to change their fishing plans as a result of evolving family or business commitments. As such, we have a few rods that have opened up in both Kharlovka and Rynda camps. If you have been contemplating the options, do use this opportunity to contact us to see what's available before the last rods for the season book up.

As some will be aware, Vladimir has also obtained the rights to fish the Strelna river on the southern coast of the Kola peninsula. The new camp for this program is currently being completed and a separate program is being established and will commence in the coming season. In due course, we will provide separate details for those ASR guests that may also wish to explore this new destination.

With best wishes from the ASR team!

Justin and Vladimir

Atlantic Salmon Reserve - associated with Farlows Travel
 

happy days

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Yes a number of people were displaced from the northern rivers last year and ended up on the kola river making tickets tight where we where, I fished spring and autumn on the Kola Peninsula last year there was enough water just a shortage of fish compared to previous years, hopefully this season will be better:)
 
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igy321

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Is there anywhere - WEBSITE ETC - that shows the state of ice on the Kola rivers? In particular the Lower Varzuga in the run-up to the 1st week of fishing in early May? Thanks in advance .... Iain
 

keirstream

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Is there anywhere - WEBSITE ETC - that shows the state of ice on the Kola rivers? In particular the Lower Varzuga in the run-up to the 1st week of fishing in early May? Thanks in advance .... Iain
Getting excited already?:)
So you should be, it's a wonderful river and an experience everyone should sample once in their lifetime if they possibly can.
I am not aware of any report other than the Roxtons blog which usually kicks off 2nd week in May when Bill opens the camp.
Roxtons Varzuga Blog: 2019 Arrival
 

scotsmac1

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Conditions wise, Iv fished Kola river near on every year for the past 8,years in mid June.
Iv found with its closeness to the sea, and surrounded by forests, it holds its moisture. Iv had great water on Kola, whilst other more remote Northern rivers, out in the Tundra really sufer for water.
Im sure the deep Forrests surrounding the river holds it temp and water level, other than freak years. Even 2018, we had great water in June, whilst the rest of northern Europe suffered.
 

Tangled

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It surprises me you don't know where the varzuga is yet you're posting as an employee of ASR either Justin or Vladimir.
No need for the surprise, I am neither an employee of ASR nor am I Justin or Vladimir, I'm just someone that received an email from ASR because I'm on their mailing list and thought I'd share the info because that's what we do here.

I'm also off to Russia this year - but not to an ASR lodge - and personally very interested in the snow reports because I don't want another year like 2018 and assume others don't want one either.

Ok?
 

happy days

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No need for the surprise, I am neither an employee of ASR nor am I Justin or Vladimir, I'm just someone that received an email from ASR because I'm on their mailing list and thought I'd share the info because that's what we do here.

I'm also off to Russia this year - but not to an ASR lodge - and personally very interested in the snow reports because I don't want another year like 2018 and assume others don't want one either.

Ok?
Sound mate, thanks, it's just the way it appeared, hopefully those going in spring don't have too much snow and ice I've had that before and one cancelled :)
 

Tangled

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Things are looking tricky now, there'll be a payment coming up soon, I think they're going to have to whistle for that until we know whether travel is possible or not.

I feel nostalgic for only worrying about the weather now.
 
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