Is this ok

sewinfly

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I'm not a big caster and I never start to cast to the far bank until I have fished the inside then lengthening the line gradually.

My wife took these on the Dunkeld House beat this year unknown to me.
Tay is a big river for me.
I was finding that I got so far across but then that was it.
Casting felt good and comfortable but I wanted a few extra yards I felt.

Rod was an NRX 14 ft Green 9/10 with a DTX 42 g floating shooting head.





Sewinfly................
 
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Rennie

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Looks real cool to me dude!,my solution is to bring the end of the head right close next to me and use the leader/poly. -which ever- to anchor the loop keeping the head all out of the water!,as it touches down I lift the rod tip a little bit to further tension/energise the loop.Then a smart tap up n out does the business.It's not all about effort, rather than just being a tadge smarter in what you do_Oh,loose the net too!,you could successfully beach a fish there too fine n dandy!,that'll let you swivel your body much better!
Hope that helps,Pedro.
P.S.there should be a not in there somewhere and its not showing for me and I cant correct, its NOT all about effort!.Cheers,Pedro.
 
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Eminem

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Something that reaches the main "foam line" in pic 1 should fish nicely into the lovely water on your side IMHO.
How did you fare on the trip?
 

P!scator

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You always open yourself up to the risk of criticism on posts like this but you asked so I’ll offer my opinion & hopefully help you think a bit about your casting - I’m not a qualified caster, I’m self-taught but I know a thing or two about casting & what makes a good efficient cast, so use the following as you wish

Firstly remember that there isn’t just 1 way to cast a fly line, different styles & techniques will deliver the same result. The pictures look good & if you are happy with your casting don’t get too hung up about it :)

First picture, the D loop looks good from the angle of the pic & arm position is good but your anchor looks to be too far downstream & possibly a bit too outboard of the bank for the direction your body is pointing, your fly & leader are in danger of crossing over the main line on your forward cast (familiar?) try to bring the line around & further upstream so the anchor lands more upstream of you but as this will take slightly longer to come around you need to keep a steady sweep with the rod tip rising continually into the casting position so that you don’t lay too much line on the surface

Second picture, line is turning over nicely although difficult to determine if there is enough momentum to straighten it out & take all the running line before it lands on the surface, your upper arm is too straight & you are leaning forward into the cast, this will give you a sore arm & back over a long days fishing (familiar?) but will still deliver a cast :), you should be standing tall with at least a slight bend in your upper arm on completion of the cast (or your upper arm fully bent if adopting the poncy lower hand pull & shoulder shove technique adopted by some shooting head casters :p)
Difficult to advise without watching ur casting & looks like 2 different casts, best simple advice I normally give is to imagine yourself in a phone box (first pic you would fit, 2nd you wouldn’t!), keep your elbows in & back straight during the cast & aim high on the forward cast with your upper arm bent & always, always keep the rod tip rising into the back cast
 

sewinfly

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Something that reaches the main "foam line" in pic 1 should fish nicely into the lovely water on your side IMHO.
How did you fare on the trip?

Was getting to the foam line as you said.But further down I felt I needed a couple of more yards.
It was just a morning session and I had a "Les Dawson" as we say in the club, blankety blank.

Thanks to the guys also for the input.

Cheers

Sewinfly
 
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I'm not qualified to give specific casting advice, but a general comment, would a longer head/Spey line and or longer rod have helped here? Shooting heads are great for small to medium rivers but I still prefer a 'traditional' outfit for big casts/rivers.

Just my 2pence!
 

minitube

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I'm not a big caster and I never start to cast to the far bank until I have fished the inside then lengthening the line gradually.

My wife took these on the Dunkeld House beat this year unknown to me.
Tay is a big river for me.
I was finding that I got so far across but then that was it.
Casting felt good and comfortable but I wanted a few extra yards I felt.

Rod was an NRX 14 ft Green 9/10 with a DTX 42 g floating shooting head.



Sewinfly................

Hi Sewinfly,

My 2 cents worth.

Your casting is not at fault when the context is that you were going for maximum distance. Straightening the top arm then is not any problem as it is in fact necessary to lengthen the casting stroke. Neither is leaning forward for more weight shift especially if you are a right foot forward caster. Longer casts requiring a longer stroke. None of this is incorrect when your specific intention is to cast further.

I'd like to stress also that there's nothing wrong with the advice given so far for general or normal fishing casting, or the linked video. Its when going for longer distance that things then change as the stroke lengthens. Everything is relative.
 
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porteouz

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Hi Sewinfly,

My 2 cents worth.

Your casting is not at fault when the context was that you were going for distance. Straightening the top arm then is not a problem as it is in fact necessary to lengthen the casting stroke. Longer casts requiring a longer stroke. This is correct when your specific intention is to cast further.

There's nothing wrong with the advice given so far for normal fishing casting, or the linked video. Its when going for distance that things then change as the stroke lengthens. Everything is relative.
Interesting minitube, I know when using longer bellys, 65+ plus that you need to lengthen your stroke but I wasn't aware this was the case for all lines. I certainly feel I get a better, further cast if I keep my arm bent. I feel the rod flexes more and therefore generates more line speed. I wonder if maybe my timing is out a bit, need to try it next time I'm out.

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

minitube

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Interesting minitube, I know when using longer bellys, 65+ plus that you need to lengthen your stroke but I wasn't aware this was the case for all lines.

Hi porteouz,

It isn't the case for all lines as a rule, however in the specific context of going for maximum distance on a big river with a shooting head there are basically two options, increase stroke length and power application, or maintain a short stroke Classic Underhand style and use the shunt down at the stop with it. As most people don't use a Classic Underhand style but in effect simply use Spey casting techniques with a shooting head outfit (which is perfectly fine, nothing wrong with that), lengthening the stroke for more distance is usually the best option for most.


I certainly feel I get a better, further cast if I keep my arm bent. I feel the rod flexes more and therefore generates more line speed. I wonder if maybe my timing is out a bit, need to try it next time I'm out.

From a high stop the counter flex of the rod is in the general direction of the trajectory of the line, this is normal and up to a point its perfect for fishing, very efficient indeed to have the counter flex of the tip in the direction of the cast. Great wind piercing tight loops also as a result. I normally have my top arm bent also when the rod is stopped, normally using short to medium stroke lengths with both shooting head and Spey lines, its most efficient.

However again in the specific context of going for maximum distance on a big river with a longer stroke then things will alter from that somewhat, but increasing stroke length still has to be done carefully. Simply pushing the top hand out and pushing the rod rip down as a result, or ruining the acceleration, or changing to a top hand thumping movement is not going to work. Everything else that makes a cast and rod work properly must still be there or maintained, the proper acceleration, the right trajectory, the correct hard stop, the bottom hand dominant in power application (preferably for me anyway) and of course staying in plane. Greater weight shift and stroke length are added only while maintaining acceleration and trajectory. The rod will load deeply because of the longer stroke and while the counter flex of the very tip section will not be perfectly in the direction of the cast so much, one could say or speculate that the power of the mid and lower section unloading will have become more important than the lighter tip section. The top hand will not be pushing down as it goes out.
 
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porteouz

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Hi porteouz,

It isn't the case for all lines as a rule, however in the specific context of going for maximum distance on a big river with a shooting head there are basically two options, increase stroke length and power application, or maintain a short stroke Classic Underhand style and use the shunt down at the stop with it. As most people don't use a Classic Underhand style but in effect simply use Spey casting techniques with a shooting head outfit (which is perfectly fine, nothing wrong with that), lengthening the stroke for more distance is usually the best option for most.




From a high stop the counter flex of the rod is in the general direction of the trajectory of the line, this is normal and up to a point its perfect for fishing, very efficient indeed to have the counter flex of the tip in the direction of the cast. Great wind piercing tight loops also as a result. I normally have my top hand bent also when the rod is stopped, normally using short to medium stroke lenghts with both shooting head and Spey lines, its most efficient.

However again in the specific context of going for maximum distance on a big river with a longer stroke then things will alter from that somewhat, but increasing stroke length still has to be done carefully. Simply pushing the top hand out and pushing the rod rip down as a result or ruining the acceleration, or changing to a top hand thumping movement is not going to work. Everything else that makes a cast and rod work properly must still be there or maintained, the proper acceleration, the right trajectory, the correct hard stop, the bottom hand dominant in power application (preferably for me anyway). Greater weight shift and stroke length are added only while maintaining acceleration and trajectory. The rod will load deeply because of the longer stroke and while the counter flex of the very tip section will not be perfectly in the direction of the cast so much, one could say or speculate that the power of the mid and lower section unloading will have become more important than the lighter tip section. The top hand will not be pushing down as it goes out.

Thanks for the detailed response, I will try it the next time I'm out. I am sure it will all go horribly wrong and I will be unable to cast in any form for the rest of the day but it's all part of the learning curve!
 
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