Is fishing dying of old age?

tenet

Well-known member
Messages
2,438
Reaction score
63
Location
cotswolds
Nothing wrong in catching big rainbows Bob.:cool: Back in my youth (read 1950's), living in London, coarse fishing the local canals, Royal Parks, River Thames at Richmond or West Drayton gravel pits were all we had. This got fishing into the blood and started a life long affiliation with the sport. As I got older and started earning money then fly fishing became all consuming with Grafham Water the chosen venue and with a move West, Chew and Blagdon. Only much later with greater disposable income did salmon fishing start along with hemorrhaging a small fortune over the years.
I think what I am trying to say is that you have to get the interest started and the route to that interest is probably coarse fishing. Unless you live on the banks of a salmon river that has good association water then youngsters just ain't going to be in the mix as the costs are prohibitive.
 

Tackle-Bag

New member
Messages
23
Reaction score
0
Location
Kilwinning
Our local club in Ayrshire has seen a reduction in juvenile permit sales consistently over the last 10 years.

It's difficult to attract the younger ones these days as they are now in a different generation.

My 2 kids love a days fishing,but when starting out we hit the Rainbow fisheries so they would catch and become "hooked" so to speak. Now when we are fishing whether it be down the local, overnight Piking or out for Wild Browns their focus isn't just on catching its on the actual days fishing experience itself.
 

wilbert

Active member
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
0
Location
Clitheroe Lancs
Numbers are definitely dropping and the old ones are not being replaced by youngsters, a perfect example of an extension vortex. To much competition out there for leisure time, I've taken my kids fishing many times but they have founds other things to interest them over the years. Cost and declining stocks are a big factor too. Very few clubs have a waiting list these days. Water that was once considered dead mans shoes now comes up fairly regularly. At 42 I'm the youngest member of my club and 20 years from now I could be fishing by myself. For some that my be their ideal situation as they only think of themselves but for me it would be a terrible day. Lets hope it never comes and do something about it.
 

goosander

Active member
Messages
3,716
Reaction score
11
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
Geebee[post 50]. It is not an easy way to raise funds fishing nights. There is a lot of time and effort by a number of people required to make the night go smoothly.
Nowadays it would not work not least because we can get fishing films straight to ones house. Some members still do a clubs dinner night but at £500 for a speaker [2required] it is a large chunk of money gone.
Having been involved in running various clubs for many years I can not see a lot of clubs existing for the simple reason that there are not enough members prepared to give there time for the good of the club.
 

Lamson v10

Well-known member
Messages
7,945
Reaction score
130
Even if the salmon were there in number you'd still have no kids on the river bank because their heids are to bizy stuck to PlayStation, x box, Instagram, twatter and your a tube, I caught my first salmon when I was 9 and never picked up a salmon rod again until I was in my 30s but whenever my old man was going salmon fishing I'd always go with him, I used to net the fish for him and his mates and do a bit of trout fishing, I was more interested in catching a 20in brownie than a 20lb salmon, chasing wild brownies on the Clyde was my addiction when a lad, no having my heid glued to a laptop or iPad or call of duty or whatever they play now
 
Last edited:

SOS

Well-known member
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
27
I would guess that most of us who go fishing had fathers or grand fathers who went fishing and we caught the bug by going out with them.
But the generation that now have kids of 8 to 16 years old of their own never had the fishing bug so are not passing it on to their kids.
There are a few reasons why that generation never took up fishing compared to previous generations.
Lack of access to free or cheep fishing.
Less fish to be caught.
Over zealous bailiffs and land owners chasing kids away from having a bit of fun trying to catch the odd Brownie.
Restriction of methods allowed on a lot of fisheries.
Catch and release when they can no longer take home their trophy to show their parents.
Also how many parents nowadays would allow their kids to fish off the rocks or on a river unsupervised like me and my mates would do when we were 13 or 14 years old.
 

cgaines10

Member
Messages
949
Reaction score
16
How many clubs actually get down to a kids level though & get them attracted? hardly any that I've seen! You need to make it "cool" & "exciting". Also the fact that it's so expensive puts a lot of them off. They just want to go down and have fun for free preferably.

As with anything, get with the times or you're out.
 

Rrrr

Well-known member
Messages
6,104
Reaction score
104
Even if the salmon were there in number you'd still have no kids on the river bank because their heids are to bizy stuck to PlayStation, x box, Instagram, twatter and your a tube, I caught my first salmon when I was 9 and never picked up a salmon rod again until I was in my 30s but whenever my old man was going salmon fishing I'd always go with him, I used to net the fish for him and his mates and do a bit of trout fishing, I was more interested in catching a 20in brownie than a 20lb salmon, chasing wild brownies on the Clyde was my addiction when a lad, no having my heid glued to a laptop or iPad or call of duty or whatever they play now
I the same when i was about that age, i would have a few casts with the big rod but would rather wander off and do my own thing with my trout rod and catch small fish. I had my salmon ticket but preferd chucking a mepp about or a greenwells glory and catch trout. Wasnt untill i was 30 that i really wanted the challenge and got back into it.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

Walleye

Well-known member
Messages
2,038
Reaction score
160
Even if the salmon were there in number you'd still have no kids on the river bank because their heids are to bizy stuck to PlayStation, x box, Instagram, twatter and your a tube, I caught my first salmon when I was 9 and never picked up a salmon rod again until I was in my 30s but whenever my old man was going salmon fishing I'd always go with him, I used to net the fish for him and his mates and do a bit of trout fishing, I was more interested in catching a 20in brownie than a 20lb salmon, chasing wild brownies on the Clyde was my addiction when a lad, no having my heid glued to a laptop or iPad or call of duty or whatever they play now
You make some good points but I don't blame the kids or the Xbox stuff. My kids are never happier than when they are out and about. The trouble these days is I feel with parenting. It's too easy to let the Xbox or the PlayStation or the fondleslab or the TV do the "babysitting".
 

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
6,547
Reaction score
208
You make some good points but I don't blame the kids or the Xbox stuff. My kids are never happier than when they are out and about. The trouble these days is I feel with parenting. It's too easy to let the Xbox or the PlayStation or the fondleslab or the TV do the "babysitting".
It is definitely easier to let devices raise your child, but I also don't think it's as easy as just... deciding not to, and going fishing. When a lot of us were kids, the norm was dad went to work and mum stayed at home, which meant that, on weekends and during evenings, adults could be more present in supporting their kids' hobbies, as well as pursue their own. Now both parents working is the norm - it feels to me like we're about 15 years past the point where you could argue that both parents don't HAVE to work, you can just cut back, into both incomes being vital - which means weekends too often end up being the time both parties play catch up on the housework and the INSANE amount of homework kids have these days (definitely much, much more than when I was a kid).

So I just think there's less time. And some of that is that we've engineered lives for ourselves with more distractions in them - like tech. But there's a hell of a lot more... MORE going on. My boy would prefer to be outside engaged in something than inside on a device, any day of the week. And obviously I try and make sure this happens. But honestly, time is such a huge issue - especially time to do homework and project work, or tackle any major project above and beyond basic keeping a house sanitary and clothes clean.
 
Last edited:

goosander

Active member
Messages
3,716
Reaction score
11
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
When I started fishing there was only wild browns to fish for in a small river. After school onto the bike and off I would go. A spate and I would miss school to go fishing. Never had anyone to show me anything. Just had to pick it up as the years went buy. Salmon fishing was for the toffs not for me.
70 Years later I am still learning. There is no point in making anything easy.
You can take a horse to water but you can not make it drink.
Bob.
 

firefly

Member
Messages
801
Reaction score
22
Location
Belgium
It is definitely easier to let devices raise your child, but I also don't think it's as easy as just... deciding not to, and going fishing. When a lot of us were kids, the norm was dad went to work and mum stayed at home, which meant that, on weekends and during evenings, adults could be more present in supporting their kids' hobbies, as well as pursue their own. Now both parents working is the norm - it feels to me like we're about 15 years past the point where you could argue that both parents don't HAVE to work, you can just cut back, into both incomes being vital - which means weekends too often end up being the time both parties play catch up on the housework and the INSANE amount of homework kids have these days (definitely much, much more than when I was a kid).

So I just think there's less time. And some of that is that we've engineered lives for ourselves with more distractions in them - like tech. But there's a hell of a lot more... MORE going on. My boy would prefer to be outside engaged in something than inside on a device, any day of the week. And obviously I try and make sure this happens. But honestly, time is such a huge issue - especially time to do homework and project work, or tackle any major project above and beyond basic keeping a house sanitary and clothes clean.
I agree and also with the fact time (and fishing) is only found again when ageing becomes an issue, when time suddenly makes itself again. The downside is the outside world may look different by then and you could have missed a lot of nature in the now. A child's experience differs a lot of that of a grown up and unless your boy is too young to go out and adventure on his own, I would encourage him, too. He'll get his clothes dirty, that's for sure. Hang them in the shed besides yours, he can put them on as they are the next time. And you can go along in yours. They're the only clothes you can wear without bothering what others may think of them, they are meant to get dirty, not to be seen in. There are no mirrors in nature. A liberating thought that makes time relative.
 

happy days

Well-known member
Messages
4,095
Reaction score
53
Location
Liverpool
Let’s be honest salmon fishing is dying from lack of fish and I don’t see youngsters fishing parks and canals anymore like the old days, I think it’s iphones, computer games and social media that they find more attractive. Times have changed.
 

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
6,547
Reaction score
208
Let’s be honest salmon fishing is dying from lack of fish and I don’t see youngsters fishing parks and canals anymore like the old days, I think it’s iphones, computer games and social media that they find more attractive. Times have changed.
Just on the canal point - finding places you can legally fish is something of a minefield. Where I used to live, the canal was out of bounds for miles either way. We did float a line naughtily a couple of times but it wasn't really cool. I guess when my boy is older he will be able to roam alone and find secret places, but nature seems more... protected, these days, than it was.

Not disputing your tech point though. 90% of kids will find Fortnite a more attractive proposition. My boy has just started playing, because ALL of his friends do. I don't mind it when they all play together with headsets because at least it feels social and it's as much about chatting and laughing as the game itself. I'd be very worried if he was a full on tech-head gamer. I have friends who cannot extract their kids from their tech. Nightmare.
 

happy days

Well-known member
Messages
4,095
Reaction score
53
Location
Liverpool
Just on the canal point - finding places you can legally fish is something of a minefield. Where I used to live, the canal was out of bounds for miles either way. We did float a line naughtily a couple of times but it wasn't really cool. I guess when my boy is older he will be able to roam alone and find secret places, but nature seems more... protected, these days, than it was.

Not disputing your tech point though. 90% of kids will find Fortnite a more attractive proposition. My boy has just started playing, because ALL of his friends do. I don't mind it when they all play together with headsets because at least it feels social and it's as much about chatting and laughing as the game itself. I'd be very worried if he was a full on tech-head gamer. I have friends who cannot extract their kids from their tech. Nightmare.
We are well served here in that the parks are free and there is about 20 odd mile of canal for £20 a year, only really see matches on the cut now, its just the game fishing nearest is an hour away :)
 
Top