Intruders for Atlantic Salmon

SJF

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Does anyone use Pacific West Coast type large intruders ( tube & single hook) for Atlantic Salmon?

They are smaller than a rapala and not too bulky to cast. I have a bunch left over from a trip to the Skeena and was wondering if I might give them a swim in the Gaula this Mid June - assuming decent water flow.
 
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I have thrown them in the Tay on occasion but to be honest the conditions were poor and I was messing around.

I think you're right - you need good water flow for them to work properly and we've have the opposite for the last few seasons it seems!
 

tynelobster

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Does anyone use Pacific West Coast type large intruders ( tube & single hook) for Atlantic Salmon?

They are smaller than a rapala and not too bulky to cast. I have a bunch left over from a trip to the Skeena and was wondering if I might give them a swim in the Gaula this Mid June - assuming decent water flow.

Or you could pass them on to someone going to the Skeena later this year - say around August :lol:
 

LouisCha

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Never tried them myself over here but don't see any reason why they wouldn't work, give them a go!

Intruder type flies certainly tend to be livelier than our standard flies, you just need a situation that requires a big profile fly fished deep

tight lines :thumb:
 

sneakypeter

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If you don,t try, you will never know! Lets face it, most Salmon fly fishing is carried out on a series of unwritten rules/dogma, the same old flies for different water etc, but ignoring some of that might just make your day/season, be bold, nothing ventured and all that!!!!!!
peter
 

miramichi

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We have some big, slow pools on the Miramichi and Cains that can hold a lot of tough to catch fish in the fall. I've had good luck with big, gaudy, marabou patterns with lots of flash that look very much like the intruders. I've used them on the slow pools in the Thurso and Naver, but haven't had much luck, though I have faith that they would work if I was casting over a fish :D. Personally I don't like the hook concept on the intruders. It may well hook plenty of fish, but I have to believe that over time it would result in quite a few fish being hooked deeply. I seem to have a good hookup percentage without going that route.
 

GeeBee

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yep.

I've had Irish grilse in high peaty water on the blue and black intruder swung very slowly.

likewise in fast high water.

I've no reason to think that red and black would not work either in similar conditions.

i tye mine very sparse using composite loops OPST stylee.

they are likely too large for low clear water IMHO.
 

Bushwhacker

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I,v been using them with some success for the past few years.
I use the bigger ones in high coloured water.Mostly i use tubes with a treble rather than shanks and a single.
Smaller ones with a single station work as well...
 

Rennie

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I've not used them myself,I'd echo the lack of flow/water scenario.However on reading through miramichi's response to the thread I'd also wonder about the hooking of fish with such flies.Primarily for the reason in that Salar tends to to go for the head of bigger flies and the single hook arrangement might not be the best, either a deeply hooked fish or one hooked tentatively round the outside of the mouth?.
The concept seems to make sense to me, but unsure as to the practicalities of actually fishing such a flee.
As ever yours truly will sit on the fence for a bit longer over intruders.
Pedro.
 

warIv

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They work with decent a flow and some colour in the river. Used them for the past ten years they have fooled Salmon on the Ribble, Ure, Tweed, Spey, And the Lune not forgetting Sea Trout, big Brownies and Chub.
 

ballintemple

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The rear hook arrangement works brilliantly for sea trout. I've seen them used successfully for salmon
 

SJF

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Well it looks like I'll be giving them a swing in Norway. also in Wales if we get big water and everyone else is Rapalla'ing.
 

GeeBee

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Smaller ones with a single station work as well...

Yes thats what i fish, single stage.

In relation to the hooking ive never hooked one deep.

And rather like tubes, i always fish the hook up rather than hanging.
 

phatagrova

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Does anyone use Pacific West Coast type large intruders ( tube & single hook) for Atlantic Salmon?

They are smaller than a rapala and not too bulky to cast. I have a bunch left over from a trip to the Skeena and was wondering if I might give them a swim in the Gaula this Mid June - assuming decent water flow.
I can guarantee you that they will work , I've fished the skeena watershed , Ive had Atlantics and Pacific , including steelhead on the exact same flies, we called one of the flies the global blue, Its all about being prepared to experiment 1248.jpg
 

goosander

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Thanks for the photo. Was going to ask what sort of flies they were. Have used rabbit fur [zonkers] in the past with good results. Personally I do not think it matters much what you fish as long as you are happy with it.
Find it hard to believe that a salmon is going to rise to a fly and turn away because your fly was a 10 G.P. and it was wanting an 1inch tube.
Bob.
 

JirkaK

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My first intruder-like creatures. If some of them return from my trip to B.C., I´ll not hesitate to try them in Norway this summer if the water will be cold/ high/ coloured.
 

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phatagrova

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My first intruder-like creatures. If some of them return from my trip to B.C., I´ll not hesitate to try them in Norway this summer if the water will be cold/ high/ coloured.

Id use those flys both home and abroad with confidence, you will get the greatest satisfaction if you hook an Atlantic on them , you might get the odd strange look , or comment but you need to perhaps being prepared to blank , but there again when you consider it's also very easy to blank using traditional patterns , IMG-20160816-WA0000.jpgIMG-20160816-WA0001.jpg1195.jpg
Ive also had a springer on the black pattern
 
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GeeBee

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this is the single stage intruder I use for Atlantics in Ireland and Steelhead in the US.

its about 4.5" long, smaller than many templedog/monkey style flies.

they are fished real slow and i think the movement triggers in Salmon the memory of artic squid.

you'll note that the only flash is in the ice dub and its tyed and fished hook up.

 

nathaniel.james

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Have thought about these for big bit clear water in spring say but I guess the confidence wouldn’t quite be there as with a proven spring pattern. Hence you won’t find much on them being used i guess
 

Icelander05

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A couple of years back I fished a broad pool on an icelandic river. At the very tail on the far bank a fish was showing frequently. I tried a couple of flies, incl. the very successful Frances without success. Finally I came acress an intruder pattern which I tried and the fish took immediately. Since then I am fishing them frequently for Atlantics with very good results.
The secret of the intruders is that they are very mobile so my opinion is that they are even more sucessful in a moderate or low flow.
Icelander05
 

GeeBee

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The secret of the intruders is that they are very mobile so my opinion is that they are even more sucessful in a moderate or low flow.
Icelander05

yes, and the sparser you tye them the more mobile they are.

a good tip is to leave them on the hang for 45 seconds ( i count it) before recasting. often a fish will slide across the pool and run and when they see it hanging, they snatch it.

you need to adjust your sink tip if using one, so you don't always hang up on the stones. you should just feel the tick tick of the cobble or gravel.

i had a 11lb hen wild steelhead take the fly on the hang in less than two feet of water.
 

Icelander05

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I usually like to fish a fast fly but sometimes it pays to let the fly hang for a while. Two years back I fished on the Rio Grande for seatrout. There was some kind of a gorge into which the intruder was drifted. Whilst on the dangle I usually would have started to strip in the fly. The guide instructed me, leave it and let it hang. This I did for at least 30 seconds and finally got a take. The fish on the bottom probably watched the intruder and possible one could not resist to take it. Another lesson learned.
Icelander05
 

warIv

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Most of the fish which have took the Intruders I have fished with, have been on or near to the dangle with the fly been so mobile.
 
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