How to fly fish deep pools?

007

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Yeah some of my grandas tales about the coquet in and about that time or maybe a bit earlier would make your hair curl (even if your bald) and my mother can well rember the coquet having a fully commercial netting station at the grandstand, different times! More fish! No conservation! Maybe more primitive methods, saved the day and less rods due to less time off for workers
LOL Marty.

There‘s a nice painting or engraving of the sweep net in the Castle Pool on the Web somewhere.

Also the guy at the bridge was quite a card apparently. You should read Frank Buckland’s description of the Warkworth Trap C 1880. The Hermit was on a 10% tithe to fund his candles. Bit like the Convent joke: “ Candles Out “ .

Later on the River Board‘s patrol boat was set afire by a family who shall remain nameless but allowed to continue with a salmon net-licence.

Did your mum ever mention the accident at the boat-landing when 6 Hardy’s fly-tiers capsised their boat and one drowned ? About 1937, was a lovely village in the turnip for X’mas days

007
 
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marty31

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LOL Marty.

There‘s a nice painting or engraving of the sweep net in the Castle Pool on the Web somewhere.

Also the guy at the bridge was quite a card apparently. You should read Frank Buckland’s description of the Warkworth Trap C 1880. The Hermit was on a 10% tithe to fund his candles. Bit like the Convent joke: “ Candles Out “ .

Later on the River Board‘s patrol boat was set afire by a family who shall remain nameless but allowed to continue with a salmon net-licence.

Did your mum ever mention the accident at the boat-landing when 6 Hardy’s fly-tiers capsised their boat and one drowned ? About 1937, was a lovely village in the turnip for X’mas days

007
Think she would have been 7 then! But i will as she is still with us and sound in mind! How things change, my granda was a opencast worker and a policeman during the war! I think he had to turn a blind eye to the goings on at times of rationing his job was guarding a viaduct above warkworth somewhere, night shift, in case of sabotage! Often wondered what he would have done if any had appered?
 

007

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Think she would have been 7 then! But i will as she is still with us and sound in mind! How things change, my granda was a opencast worker and a policeman during the war! I think he had to turn a blind eye to the goings on at times of rationing his job was guarding a viaduct above warkworth somewhere, night shift, in case of sabotage! Often wondered what he would have done if any had appered?
Nice she’s still around, best regards to her. The drowning made the press at time. My old man ( MOM ) was on Mill Walk at the time and my mum was well pregnant with my sister who was born 28.5.37.

MOM was a strong swimmer since he’d to swim to work as he had no shoes in the Great Depression. But he worked out he could only save one by swimming. So he took a boat and tied all 6 to the rowlocks and got them ashore. Tragic one died but when you think about it, 5 whole families and descendants were given life because of his quick thinking. He was extraordinarily strong and modest. I guess he didn’t even get a turnip out if it. This was only one of several heroic acts in his lifetime. Never got to Tweed though, too ill by the time we could afford it.

My mum was terrified and nearly lost my sis.

007
 

marty31

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Nice she’s still around, best regards to her. The drowning made the press at time. My old man ( MOM ) was on Mill Walk at the time and my mum was well pregnant with my sister who was born 28.5.37.

MOM was a strong swimmer since he’d to swim to work as he had no shoes in the Great Depression. But he worked out he could only save one by swimming. So he took a boat and tied all 6 to the rowlocks and got them ashore. Tragic one died but when you think about it, 5 whole families and descendants were given life because of his quick thinking. He was extraordinarily strong and modest. I guess he didn’t even get a turnip out if it. This was only one of several heroic acts in his lifetime. Never got to Tweed though, too ill by the time we could afford it.

My mum was terrified and nearly lost my sis.

007
Amazing story! And heroic, tweed was for the (silver spoon) brigade in those days! Us peasants had to make do with stewed turnip! And tip our hats to the gentry, as a token thank you!
 

Salarspeycaster

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A full ultra fast sinker, at least a sink 5. The old Teeny lines in a 700g or the like. Probably a red Francis of some description and a lot of patience to let the fly get down. A slow ‘Tweed Twitch’ would be my retrieve, ie. 5 inch short pulls with a pause between them. When a fish takes I’ve found the best way for a hook up is just to keep on pulling the line until it all locks up I’ve fished Tweed a lot over the years and Norham Bridge Pool is a likely contender depth wise and would be fished by the methods I’ve outlined.
 

Andrew B

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I remember reading about an experienced bloke who was famed for his game pie company?
He would take the same week every summer on one of the Highland rivers and even the hottest, lowest of conditions he would always get his name on the board by going down to the deep pools at first light with 6lb leader and a small teal blue and silver and as the other poster mentioned he would cast upstream and winkle one out.

That’s real skill imo, to catch the seemingly impossible fish when common sense tells us there’s no chance.
 

Jim Elie

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Hi,
The steelhead were first introduced in Lake Ontario prior to 1900 after its unique Atlantic salmon population continued to plummet and eventually became extinct. The steelhead introduction was successful here and in the other Great Lakes, Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior. They continue to be stocked but the emphasis is on raising wild smolts from individual tributary river populations and creating a self sustaining population. These “migratory rainbows” have many of the same qualities of west coast steelies and offer tremendous sporting opportunities for fly anglers in the rivers during their spring and fall runs. They can also be pursued in the Great Lakes where they can be caught while casting and trolling flies and spoons. Brown Trout were also introduced to the tributaries and a lake run migratory variety has also developed and are frequently caught during the fall runs. The natural Lake Trout populations have been revived and they are commonly caught at the mouth of the Niagara River in Lake Ontario. A lake run Brook trout, known as a Coaster, is another popular migratory trout, and has also .been reintroduced here.
Pacific Salmon were also introduced to the Great Lakes in the 1960s. Chinook, Coho, and Pinks continue to be stocked and are popular with charter operators and boating anglers trolling flies or spoons in the Lakes. The world record Coho salmon was caught in Lake Ontario.
New York State and Ontario’s fishery management continue to emphasize revival of native species and have reintroduced Atlantic salmon to Lake Ontario. This is long term effort that has had limited results but Atlantic’s are frequently caught by anglers targeting steelhead.
With the variety of salmonoids available, the Niagara River offers a unique angling opportunity.

Canada’s Maritime provinces have isolated runs of steelhead and brown trout in rivers that have had stocking or accidental releases of farmed rainbow trout. The natural occurring sea trout here are brook or also known as speckled trout.They are common on most salmon rivers here and are a prized catch.
 
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