How to fish Deep?

Geordieboy

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Evening all.

This is my 2nd year salmon fishing. I caught my first fish, a hen of about 7lbs at the back end of the season on one of my own flies. Ecstatic was an understatement.

I have fly fished for 46 years and know a thing or two on how to present a fly. However, on a river, depth flow, speed of current are all challenges to getting deep.

Naturally, I have Rio Scandi Versitips, Skajits, Guideline sink tips , T-Tips polys...... In short everything. I'm a child and male and like toys. Nuff sed.

I've caught all my fish this year on the Versitip. But this year on the tweed, I fished the fast 15ft tip and a brass tube and never touched the bottom. No matter how mended the line.

I loved how I could cast 35yds with the skajit in a big wind, but I wanted to fish deep.

How does everyone do it? I'll happily buy more and risk divorce again if it helps!

Thanks everyone
 

ibm59

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Try river trouting.
It’ll teach you far more about getting the depth and speed of your fly right than years of salmon ’ fishing ‘
After all , the trout are usually there. 😉
 

MCXFisher

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Rule 1 - no matter how deep you want to go, remember to present the fly above the salmon's sight line, where it's easier to detect.
Rule 2 - in general, put weight on the line and leader before you put it on the fly. The back end should be heavier than the front, and loaded progressively along the length.
Rule 3 - if you wish to get deep, fish a full sinking shooting head, so you've got 50 feet underwater, rather than just the last 15-20. It's much easier to cast and turn over a heavy tube fly when it's on the end of a sinking head + fast sinking poly + tippet combination than just on 12' of plain mono tippet. If I wish to go deep my preferred option is the Guideline 3D S2-4-6 (probably superseded by now), but others will have their own favourites. It fishes more slowly in fast water than a floating line.
Rule 4 - use a polyleader of at least the same density or 1 step heavier than the last bit of sinking head on the far end
Rule 5 - keep the mono tippet short.

More often than not you will need to roll cast the line up to the surface before commencing your cast proper. Once you get the hang of a sinking head you will really enjoy its casting performance, especially in wind and adverse conditions.
 

Rennie

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In short Geordieboy, full sinking shooting heads or lines. Over time you'll like as not find it's often about beating the speed of the current as much as plumbing the depths.
Let's state the obvious 1st in that the worst thing you can have is a line that sinks too quick, better with one thats a bit too slow!. But when you need to get down, well you need to get down.
There's more ways of getting down than you can shake a bagful of shaky sticks at.
Your so far approach of bits of sinking stuff on the end of bits of floating stuff will only get you so far as your discovering, however the addition of a 10ft poly of an equal or faster sink rate to a 15ft multi tip will give up to 25ft of graduated sinker, the poly having a thinner diameter can make all the difference sometimes and get you where you want to be.However, the long floating section will more likely fish round quicker, pulling the sinking section faster than it needs to fish and naturaly the sinking section tends to plane upward from the floating section especially in strong fast currents any way.
If we accept that the std sinking line or head sinks at about 3 ips, this will always fish deeper than a 3 ips poly or 3 ips 15ft tip, because there's more of it and it will get deeper and under the surface flow, not be dragged round faster like a floater and not plane the tip section upward in the water column. So in effect, you might not need as fast a sinking line as you thought you might do!.
If we utilise common sense and talk about using primarily shooting heads here, everything gets made so much easier.. So a std 3 ips sinking shooting head will cover an awful lot of bases in Salmon fishing, however if you still need to get down a bit, 10ft sinking polys on the front will give you wiggle room and a bit more capability with the same line, then brass, copper, tungsten tubes, cone heads and combinations thereof also open the game out. Now in my waistcoat/wading jacket pocket I always carry a few lengths of T stuff, 5ft, 7ft, 10ft, as a get out of jail card-T14 actually!, so as long as the T stuff is faster than the line I can botch a cast together with it and get the job done.
There are times however having the right tool for the job means the difference twixt Silver or sod all!,so a faster sinking head might be required.
Given a choice, a Double Density sinker that sinks level or slightly tip 1st is whats required, they cast well, can carry a poly, fish round in the water well, you don't want the old style sinkers that sank quicker in the middle and significantly slower in the tip!, the front half of the line will get where you want and the back remain a bit higher in the water- it's not a good idea to put the whole line in and amongst fish!- and you ideally want a nice graduated slope twixt rod tip and fish for better contact and feel, better hook up too, avoid steep angles if you can!!.
3D lines are great, but fish differently, they definitely fish tip end down and a nice slope back up to the rod tip, they'll fish a tadge faster too with more line higher in the water column, but are less likely to spook fish!.It often feels like they're just aimlessly drifting round, but Guideline's Hover/Inty/3 and Inty./Sink2/Sink4 head with 5ft polys will cover most salmon fishing options for a fully sunk fly.For the fast or deep stuff, a 1/3/5 or 2/4/6 will get right down and beat severe currents, 3/5/8 is oooppphhh ya booger fast.
If you absolutely have to get down, no questions, the Scientific Anglers Deepwater Express lines rule the roost, 10yd 550grn, 700grn and 850 grain sink straight and level at up to 10 ips, splice those to 30lb amnesia and you'll spend all day tying flee's back on!, these are highly specialised bits of kit, not for lightweight scandi rods or beginners either.
No doubt, your head is swimming, all you need to know is how to handle a fully sunk head, its not hard or a huge physical effort, modern heads are significantly easier than DT or Spey profile lines to both handle and fish.In fact due to their increased density and lower diameter, they're easier to cast and usually go further to boot.There's just a few common sense brain skill's you need to develop and you'll be fine. Start with a 3 ips sinker or a hover/inty/3 and go from there, its highly unlikely you'll need more than 6 ips, something 4 to 5 ips won't be far off, don't ignore an intermediate either!
Best of luck, Pedro.
 

simonjh98

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Geordieboy

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Works for me. I prefer the mepp but learning to fish it well will teach you all about angles, depths and speeds.
Im quite lucky to be able to do alot of sight fishing for salmon with the mepp and it teaches you loads about how they interact and behave.

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I remember as a lad, with my father a Water bailiff, I used to spin for salmon and sea trout. Certainly, I learned a lot about how to read a river, but at 7 years old, never really figured out that I needed to get down with my limited collection of spinners.
 

Rrrr

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I remember as a lad, with my father a Water bailiff, I used to spin for salmon and sea trout. Certainly, I learned a lot about how to read a river, but at 7 years old, never really figured out that I needed to get down with my limited collection of spinners.
I think it alows you to experiment without spooking the fish with a fly line/cast over them.

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