How do Salmon find the Worm in Dirty Water?

Rennie

Well-known member
Messages
5,860
Reaction score
1,822
Location
Gods County
Wasn’t it Charlie Bettinson that fished the Devon/Cornwall rivers with bait, using shrimp and worm together at the same time?. Seem to remember he did very well!.
Pedro.
 

tony considine

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
281
Location
Aberdeenshire
In big, dirty water I have done very well with a big prawn, a supermarket special, not the preserved coastal shrimps. Pale pink, natural colour, smell must have something to do with it, or maybe its size, and or smell combined. Others fishing the shrimp failed to get a take, not just once, but many times, even taking fish, following someone fishing the shrimp , much to their annoyance!
Peter,
Thank you for your post. It supports an incident that happened to me many years back and still puzzled me.
Some of us remember pre-internet. No river heights, you got what existed when you arrived. A garden fork was an essential part of your kit.
It would be either fly, spinner or worm, you planned for everything.
We arrived one morning, after a two hour drive, to find a brown flood. Worms duly dug and we were fishing.
Myself and a mate were fishing a cut-back off the main flow, which created a nice easy stream.
Lunchtime arrived without a bite. A bit surprising.
I remembered in my bag were two old prawns from a week previous. A bit ripe, but for something daft, give them a go.
Two casts and two fish later, no prawns left, back to worming and no more fish!
You could say those fish had just arrived, but I doubt it. Even if they had, the response was amazing. They hit the prawn as soon as it reached their depth.
Unless it's a spate river, fish don't like to run on a brown flood. Why would they? Fish in the system tend to hunker down somewhere quiet, knowing that probably within 48hrs, conditions will be perfect to run. The current will ease, less silt in suspension and less floating debris. Good running conditions and because of fish movement, good fishing conditions.
With hindsight, I should have repeated the experiment, but I never did. More or less due to circumstances.
Living in Scotland, I am unable to try it again, but I would if I could.
There will be some reading this whose rules allow it. I would suggest they give it a try.
t.c.
 

sneakypeter

Well-known member
Messages
1,852
Reaction score
496
I have a bunch of contacts who live close to the Chalkstreams, this gives me a valuable edge when deciding on bait choice when allowed. In clear water/low flows a supermarket special, dyed purple is the weapon of choice, in coloured/rising water, just a plain natural one, a bit coloured, either. But always a supermarket special, not as good looking as a coastal shrimp, lacking whiskers etc, but that does not seem to matter, I will happily refreeze them too, several times, you certainly would not want to eat them, washing hands before eating always a good idea, but the salmon do not seem to care, smell must be a factor?
 

tony considine

Well-known member
Messages
374
Reaction score
281
Location
Aberdeenshire
Very interesting Peter. Like you, I used supermarket specials. Not for any other reason than they were easily available, I was not that experienced, these were prawns and I'd heard salmon took prawns. When they caught fish, Q.E.D.
The heavily coloured water was just a daft experiment to do something different. I really should have followed it up.
You have to think smell was a factor. We do know that salmon have a very well developed smell capability. In clear water sight is obviously the prime factor, whether fly, spinner, prawns or shrimp. When visibility decreases, we are into the unknown. You have the known unknowns, then what about the unknown unknowns? :confused:
t.c.
 
Top