Holding a fish for a picture.

lefthandup

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What's the thoughts of anglers holding their salmon for a supposedly quick photo before releasing?

I've personally seen some howlers recently.... everything from selfies with the salmon ....picking them up by the tail....holding them as far away from the body as possible so it looks bigger.

Even saw the same fish being held by a different angler so it looks like they had a cracking days fishing.

It's been a superb spring so far for hookups so not had very much fish holding opportunity myself with no fewer than 15 fish lost to 4 banked...(not a good innings by any means).
 

Hardyreels

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This is how I do it if I have someone to take the image.







No need for anyone to see my handsome face and I know very well whose hands those are. I do the same for people who fish with me and do not allow grip and grin photos. I have become so weary of seeing the images of men hoisting fish as if it is some sort of talisman or sacrifice that I no longer comment. If the intent is fishing for fun and C&R then why does anyone need to do excessive handling of the poor creature?

This is how I handle things when alone.



I figure that if the viewer (myself included) can't tell by the tail how big it was there's no point in worrying about them.

I wasn't always this way, I've done it all but as years turned to decades and decades to a half century I realize how lame I was in photos taken years ago.
 

Jockiescott

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I've never felt the need to have a photo taken with my Catches. In saying that, I take a photo of every fish I manage to land.

I have to submit a catch return every season and when I'm sitting in late November trying to remember what I'd caught and when I caught it, it is just so much handier flicking through the photos on my phone and seeing the pictures of the fish with the date and time displayed above them.

Just a quick photo in the water, in the net, before releasing again.

IMG_20210515_193652.jpg
 

Andrew B

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There’s been times where I’ve caught a nice trout and im fiddling about trying to find my phone whilst trying to hold a fish that just wants to swim off and I think WTF am I doing here lol?
If you’re on your own, you really need a landing net, otherwise the process just takes too long and for what?
 

chriswjx

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This is how I do it if I have someone to take the image.







No need for anyone to see my handsome face and I know very well whose hands those are. I do the same for people who fish with me and do not allow grip and grin photos. I have become so weary of seeing the images of men hoisting fish as if it is some sort of talisman or sacrifice that I no longer comment. If the intent is fishing for fun and C&R then why does anyone need to do excessive handling of the poor creature?

This is how I handle things when alone.



I figure that if the viewer (myself included) can't tell by the tail how big it was there's no point in worrying about them.

I wasn't always this way, I've done it all but as years turned to decades and decades to a half century I realize how lame I was in photos taken years ago.

Ard, I thought it was mandatory out in the Americas that all fish photos need to be done with the rod either over your shoulder or being held in your mouth like a dog bone? 🤪
 

lefthandup

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What about them lying on the grass....I forgot about that one.....landing net right next to the fish too.

The new fad seems to be lovingly looking at the fish when the picture is taken.
 

NT

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I've never felt the need to have a photo taken with my Catches. In saying that, I take a photo of every fish I manage to land.

I have to submit a catch return every season and when I'm sitting in late November trying to remember what I'd caught and when I caught it, it is just so much handier flicking through the photos on my phone and seeing the pictures of the fish with the date and time displayed above them.

Just a quick photo in the water, in the net, before releasing again.

View attachment 61186
Wish I had that problem, it doesn't take me long to count up the number of salmon caught in a season, I just hold up one hand and fold down four fingers!
 

Hardyreels

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Ard, I thought it was mandatory out in the Americas that all fish photos need to be done with the rod either over your shoulder or being held in your mouth like a dog bone? 🤪

I do have one like that from a few years ago, it's a trout and I'm opposed to dunking my reels so ......



Older than I thought, I just noticed I'm wearing an old G3 jacket in that one. Been sporting the new G4 for 4 years so that must be 5 years ago. I make hands jokes often because I'm the size of the average power forward in the NBA just older :)
 

Hoddom

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Do my best to touch the fish as little as possible. How many photos of fish do you need? The fish I didn’t take pictures of are all way bigger (in my mind) than the ones I snap😃
 

goosander

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What's the thoughts of anglers holding their salmon for a supposedly quick photo before releasing?

I've personally seen some howlers recently.... everything from selfies with the salmon ....picking them up by the tail....holding them as far away from the body as possible so it looks bigger.

Even saw the same fish being held by a different angler so it looks like they had a cracking days fishing.

It's been a superb spring so far for hookups so not had very much fish holding opportunity myself with no fewer than 15 fish lost to 4 banked...(not a good innings by any means).
That is the modern fisher wanting photos to show off. Having said that i like to see photos of fish caught.
Can not believe that a fish fighting its way up a river being a few minutes out the water will do it much harm compared to the time some people spend playing a fish. See fish in a landing net lying still that are well knackered.
Need to watch what we [ me] put on here as there will be anti fishers looking for a chance.
Bob.
 

Slaneysider

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The best way is if you have somebody with you to land the fish for you, you could save half the time playing the fish and if you lift it just above the water and just for that split second to get the photograph there is little or no harm done.
Trying to land a fish on a double hander with an outstretched lefthand is awkward enough at the best of times, I often got them in close enough only for them to swim away as soon as they see you, but if you had help you could capture it the moment it comes into the shallow water you could walk it towards the net like a dog on a leash.
Personally I don't like fishing with other people, I spent years and years gaining knowledge and learning and caught fish on water where other anglers would walk bye.
Salmon are so scarce now its like a dog eat dog World on the riverbank nowadays.
I've seen a few of your videos on YouTube I think that's nearly the best way to capture the whole thing.
 

tony considine

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As a recent 'guilty' party, I feel inclined to comment. I play fish pretty hard and land them quickly. That particular fish was unhooked in the net, in the water, and lifted from the water for three or four seconds prior to release. Did that damage the fish? I very much doubt it. Would I take a similar picture for an angler, if requested? Yes.
A pet hate is seeing fish 'played' for two or three times longer than necessary, then trying to turn belly up on release. That must surely cause more damage.
If it's nothing special and 'just another fish' to you, no argument about 'best practice', unhook it in the net or held in the water, release when ready.
We are over-protective and P.C. about so many things in life, I don't like to see salmon become one of them.
I 'get it' on the carp scene, where individual fish can be very valuable, caught multiple times, and released into a closed environment. Salmon are obviously wild and totally different.
There are so many threats to salmon survival, but the miniscule percentage caught, taken out of the water for a picture then released, must be pretty close to the bottom of the list!
I think we need to be a bit careful here. We risk shooting ourselves in the foot. The more we discuss and argue about fish handling and publicise it, we start to offer ammunition to the 'antis', who can be very selective in siezing something and making a big deal of it.
t.c.
 

firefly

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As a recent 'guilty' party, I feel inclined to comment. I play fish pretty hard and land them quickly. That particular fish was unhooked in the net, in the water, and lifted from the water for three or four seconds prior to release. Did that damage the fish? I very much doubt it. Would I take a similar picture for an angler, if requested? Yes.
A pet hate is seeing fish 'played' for two or three times longer than necessary, then trying to turn belly up on release. That must surely cause more damage.
If it's nothing special and 'just another fish' to you, no argument about 'best practice', unhook it in the net or held in the water, release when ready.
We are over-protective and P.C. about so many things in life, I don't like to see salmon become one of them.
I 'get it' on the carp scene, where individual fish can be very valuable, caught multiple times, and released into a closed environment. Salmon are obviously wild and totally different.
There are so many threats to salmon survival, but the miniscule percentage caught, taken out of the water for a picture then released, must be pretty close to the bottom of the list!
I think we need to be a bit careful here. We risk shooting ourselves in the foot. The more we discuss and argue about fish handling and publicise it, we start to offer ammunition to the 'antis', who can be very selective in siezing something and making a big deal of it.
t.c.
I agree, Tony, a picture only takes seconds when you've got someone to assist. And when you're alone you photograph it in the net and in the water. And of course we need to take utmost care of the fish, but they're not made of porcelain. This is how (sedated) brown trout genitors are handled each year in a hatchery, and they live to die of old age. I used to guide the visitors during the demo weekend, but I also worked with the team throughout the year. On average, a farmed trout gets scooped up in a net, transported from one pond to another, hand picked and measured three to four times before it arrives at its final destination. And there it gets photographed by a happy angler, who wants to return it. No big deal if he knows what he's doing.

Like you, I liked to play my fish hard. I once played a grilse so hard, it shivered whilst unhooking in the water, stiffened and died in my hands before I could lift it. Now that shook me.

mirwart 008.jpg
mirwart 007.jpg
mirwart 011.jpg
 

The flying Scotsman

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You can't blame people for wanting a pic of their trophy especially now killing a fish to take home is like murdering a police cheifs wife.
I always take a pic of fish I catch.
If I've got a net I will take a pic of the fish in the net. If someone else is there I will get them ready to take a pic as I'm unhooking the fish then a quick pic of me holding the fish immediately before I turn around and release the fish. These pics normally have water streaming off the fish it happens so quickly.
If I don't have a net or someone with me I will bank the fish lay my rod next to it and then take a quick pic before I release it.
Unless its a grilse or a cock fish below 10lb that the river/beat/date allows me to keep then I will chap it and take it home to eat.
Yes I still kill salmon :eek:
The day we stop doing that will be the final nail in the coffin for our beloved sport.
All hens and large fish released irregardless.
 

goosander

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There are so many threats to salmon survival, but the miniscule percentage caught, taken out of the water for a picture then released, must be pretty close to the bottom of the list!
I think we need to be a bit careful here. We risk shooting ourselves in the foot. The more we discuss and argue about fish handling and publicise it, we start to offer ammunition to the 'antis', who can be very selective in siezing something and making a big deal of it.
t.c.
We will be using rubber hooks soon. Every fisher that goes on about how cruel lifting a fish is just giving the anties more ammunition.
Bob..
 

Jockiescott

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Of course people are allowed to take a photo of their fish but, like everything else, there's a right and a wrong way to do it.

I have seen people hook fish, play them for far too long, beach them onto gravel and rocks, grab them by the tail and carry them even further from the river where they spend 5 minutes trying to remove a Treble hook with their fingers, then try to get their phone out of their pocket, then drop their phone while the fish starts flapping on the bank and they start wrestling with it, then pick the phone up, take a dozen photographs from a dozen different angles, then try to post the photo to Facebook even with a poor mobile signal so they walk around the bank with their phone held in the air looking for signal, then finally remembering there's a fish on the bank which they hawl back to the river, again by the tail, and let the fish go on the first kick. That's their version of a "quick pic before release".

These same people look down their noses at someone keeping a fish to eat.

I really don't have a problem with people taking a photo of a fish or people keeping fish to eat. Each to their own.

Just try to use the best practices as possible whatever you decide to do with your fish.
 

seeking

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If you really need a hero shot, rather than the normal non-egoist way (i.e. in the net in the water) ideally the fish should be knocked on the head so it doesn't slip out of your hands when being photographed or do itself any damage when out the watter for 10 mins. Seen that so many times.

Basic mistake. Easily solved. Priest.
 

Andrew B

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As a recent 'guilty' party, I feel inclined to comment. I play fish pretty hard and land them quickly. That particular fish was unhooked in the net, in the water, and lifted from the water for three or four seconds prior to release. Did that damage the fish? I very much doubt it. Would I take a similar picture for an angler, if requested? Yes.
A pet hate is seeing fish 'played' for two or three times longer than necessary, then trying to turn belly up on release. That must surely cause more damage.
If it's nothing special and 'just another fish' to you, no argument about 'best practice', unhook it in the net or held in the water, release when ready.
We are over-protective and P.C. about so many things in life, I don't like to see salmon become one of them.
I 'get it' on the carp scene, where individual fish can be very valuable, caught multiple times, and released into a closed environment. Salmon are obviously wild and totally different.
There are so many threats to salmon survival, but the miniscule percentage caught, taken out of the water for a picture then released, must be pretty close to the bottom of the list!
I think we need to be a bit careful here. We risk shooting ourselves in the foot. The more we discuss and argue about fish handling and publicise it, we start to offer ammunition to the 'antis', who can be very selective in siezing something and making a big deal of it.
t.c.
Boom!! You’re bang on here. Overplay those bright fish, fresh in from the sea. I’ve then seen videos of said fish being carried up a banking for a picture, followed by a minutes walk upstream to find some oxygenated water to help bring it round. I mean in their head they genuinely feel they’ve done good but despite swimming off, these fish are highly likely to end up dead within a day or so.
On the Ribble they trapped some large springers in a weir to fit with radio trackers and even when they were anaesthetised and handled with care, for some reason a few were found dead within the next day or so?
 

Andrew B

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I agree, Tony, a picture only takes seconds when you've got someone to assist. And when you're alone you photograph it in the net and in the water. And of course we need to take utmost care of the fish, but they're not made of porcelain. This is how (sedated) brown trout genitors are handled each year in a hatchery, and they live to die of old age. I used to guide the visitors during the demo weekend, but I also worked with the team throughout the year. On average, a farmed trout gets scooped up in a net, transported from one pond to another, hand picked and measured three to four times before it arrives at its final destination. And there it gets photographed by a happy angler, who wants to return it. No big deal if he knows what he's doing.

Like you, I liked to play my fish hard. I once played a grilse so hard, it shivered whilst unhooking in the water, stiffened and died in my hands before I could lift it. Now that shook me.

View attachment 61223View attachment 61224View attachment 61225

There seems to be a big difference between bright fish accustoming to fresh water, as oppose to coloured fish or like in the pic here trout ready for spawning.
 
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