Have you seen a Shad?

Editor

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
677
Reaction score
326
Location
Brighton, UK

Source: Natural Resources Wales
[h=3]This month, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is asking people for their help to record sightings of a rare fish found in Welsh rivers.[/h]In June, thousands of Shad spawn in three rivers in South Wales, the Wye, Usk and Tywi. But NRW is interested in possible sightings elsewhere too, especially in North Wales.
There are two species, the allis shad (Alosa alosa) and twaite shad (Alosa fallax) which spend most of their lives at sea however, at this time of year, they move to rivers to spawn.*After spawning many of them die, but each female produces thousands of eggs to start the next generation.*Shad populations – which are threatened in the UK and Europe –* seem to be doing well in Wales.
Tristan Hatton-Ellis, Freshwater Ecosystems Team Leader at Natural Resources Wales said;
Like the swallow, shads are a sign of summer on the rivers and we are interested in shad records from anywhere in Wales but particularly from rivers in North Wales where we think there may be small populations.
“Look out for them at dusk in the middle to lower reaches of rivers, where you can see them circling one another.
“Later in the night, they spawn with a lot of noisy splashing as the males chase the females.
[h=4]Interesting Facts about Shad[/h]
  • Shad are*a protected species because they are so rare.
  • Allis and twaite shad are the only members of the herring family found in freshwater in the UK. They have various other names including the May Fish, King of the Herring,*and Bony Horseman.
  • Shad were once widely fished in Europe and were formerly eaten in Britain. In the Severn Estuary during 19th century, shad made up about one third of all catches, their value rivalling salmon.
  • Shad spawning takes place in flowing water over stones and gravel. Eggs take about four to six days to hatch. The young fish then drop quickly downstream to estuaries and inshore waters where they feed on small shrimps and grow rapidly.
  • Shad can live for 10 years. Females grow faster than males.
Tristan Hatton-Ellis added:
River or sea anglers sometimes catch them by accident, and you may also come across carcasses of fish that have either died naturally or been caught by otters.
“If you do catch a shad, please take a photograph and carefully return it to the river, minimizing handling as they are more delicate than many other fish.
If you see a shad or any other interesting wildlife, please send the record to one of the Local Records Centres across Wales.
There are four centres covering different parts of the country (see www.lercwales.org.uk) who store the information.
Photographs of shad can be sent to Tristan.hatton-ellis@naturalresourceswales.gov.uk for identification.


Article Source...
 

Junior fisher2001

New member
Messages
82
Reaction score
0
Shad

I have seen one single photo of a Tees shad, and the same day the same lad caught a sea bass a aswel! we have had a few caught now in the Tees the types with the stripey tail colours,my father tells me they also get caught in the tidal Yorkshire Ouse now and then,not sure which of the two species they both are?

Ive been searching youtube for the John Wilson fishing series from the 80s as dad says he was legally catching them perhaps the Usk (perhaps with flounder spoon/flick spinners) in either April or May as that he thinks is the time they enter certain rivers to spawn.They also turn up in the Solway but again these are only visitors to that area,as none have been reported as spawning,they look like herring on arnie steroids.These fish are TRULY rare.

The river Wharfe could be a very good place to start a stocking programme,if that is possible,as the Wharfes tidal range falls out naturally with no weirs or obstructions,so when the fish leave the Ouse they have a free run to the Wharfe freshwater.

I will ask my father when he gets back in too sort out the shad pics he has ,the ones his friends caught.
 
Last edited:

Dave Wilkinson

New member
Banned
Messages
1,226
Reaction score
0
Sparling

If all lower rivers dams we're knocked out we might get the Sparling ( or Smelt ) back too, which redds on brackish or tidal sandbanks. Must have been great sea-trout food at one time. Lost from Tyne c 1840 too. EA silent on this valuable fish. Down to c 3 rivers now: Tay. Forth, Solway.


I have seen one single photo of a Tees shad, and the same day the same lad caught a sea bass a aswel! we have had a few caught now in the Tees the types with the stripey tail colours,my father tells me they also get caught in the tidal Yorkshire Ouse now and then,not sure which of the two species they both are?

Ive been searching youtube for the John Wilson fishing series from the 80s as dad says he was legally catching them perhaps the Usk (perhaps with flounder spoon/flick spinners) in either April or May as that he thinks is the time they enter certain rivers to spawn.They also turn up in the Solway but again these are only visitors to that area,as none have been reported as spawning,they look like herring on arnie steroids.These fish are TRULY rare.

The river Wharfe could be a very good place to start a stocking programme,if that is possible,as the Wharfes tidal range falls out naturally with no weirs or obstructions,so when the fish leave the Ouse they have a free run to the Wharfe freshwater.

I will ask my father when he gets back in too sort out the shad pics he has ,the ones his friends caught.
 

Junior fisher2001

New member
Messages
82
Reaction score
0
Cree

If all lower rivers dams we're knocked out we might get the Sparling ( or Smelt ) back too, which redds on brackish or tidal sandbanks. Must have been great sea-trout food at one time. Lost from Tyne c 1840 too. EA silent on this valuable fish. Down to c 3 rivers now: Tay. Forth, Solway.

Yes i believe that smelts are in the river Cree? again a true endangered fish,we have a few proper endangered fishes here in the uk,the most endangered being the extinct Burbot and the E/A say that Burbot need ice to spawn under,well they seem to do ok in France and Begium areas,So why not here? the Ure trust manager told dad that he actually had hold of some in melton mowbray college a few years ago but they were deemed not fit for uk waters as Burbot the ones from Denmark carry a parasite of some sort and it was feared that they could/would infect the waterways,but they bred them successfully.Sturgeons were going to be gifted by the French and Andalucians (Spanish) as they still have natural stock running in one or two rivers,but it never went ahead,imagine fishing for salmon with the chance of sturgeon ? Then we have the Houting a migratory (coregon) similar to a white fish (powan/skelly) they migrated to the sea off the coast of perhaps Denmark but are now totally extinct,but they is another species that inhabits the coasts of Denmark and Perhaps Holland,so why not introduce that species if it is similar to the native stock we once had-root causes has to be pollution.Nothing else can have caused this perhaps only natural progresion of a species that has had its day,but pollutants seems to be the overall cause of extinction or near extinction in some cases.


Environment Agency reveals ‘secret seven’ fish - GOV.UK
 
Last edited:

Sawyer

Active member
Messages
262
Reaction score
122
Been catching plenty on the Dwyfor over the last couple of seasons, also caught them just offshore whilst fishing for Bass
 

Dave Wilkinson

New member
Banned
Messages
1,226
Reaction score
0
You know more than i

Well conservation is simple for me: leave the world in. batter lace then when you arrived.

I think it was furunculosis which was endemic in Denmark and came to Tweed, maybe about 1850 - 1890, see Dr Campbells comments on RTC site.

One sturgeon has been caught in a Tweed net and DR C has a list of all Tweed species encountered.

I hope you are left with some the endangered fish anyway after I'm 6' under..



Yes i believe that smelts are in the river Cree? again a true endangered fish,we have a few proper endangered fishes here in the uk,the most endangered being the extinct Burbot and the E/A say that Burbot need ice to spawn under,well they seem to do ok in France and Begium areas,So why not here? the Ure trust manager told dad that he actually had hold of some in melton mowbray college a few years ago but they were deemed not fit for uk waters as Burbot the ones from Denmark carry a parasite of some sort and it was feared that they could/would infect the waterways,but they bred them successfully.Sturgeons were going to be gifted by the French and Andalucians (Spanish) as they still have natural stock running in one or two rivers,but it never went ahead,imagine fishing for salmon with the chance of sturgeon ? Then we have the Houting a migratory (coregon) similar to a white fish (powan/skelly) they migrated to the sea off the coast of perhaps Denmark but are now totally extinct,but they is another species that inhabits the coasts of Denmark and Perhaps Holland,so why not introduce that species if it is similar to the native stock we once had-root causes has to be pollution.Nothing else can have caused this perhaps only natural progresion of a species that has had its day,but pollutants seems to be the overall cause of extinction or near extinction in some cases.


Environment Agency reveals ‘secret seven’ fish - GOV.UK
 

hut pool

Active member
Messages
394
Reaction score
30
Location
livingston west lothian or on a river 75mls from h
Came across a shoal of Twaite Shad in the R Earn about 30 yrs ago ,there must have been 50/60 in the shoal ,I have heard about a few caught in the lower reaches in June on small worms by anglers after Sea Trout ,June was also the month when the Lamprays ran up to spawn.
 

Bushwhacker

Well-known member
Messages
1,974
Reaction score
334
Location
Makemland
We get quite a few of them caught from my local pier every year on spinners and bait intended for Mackerel.
My mate owns a tackle shop and he gets a lot of people bringing them in thinking they have a record Herring as they don,t know what they are and also that its illegal to keep them.
I have had the odd one over the years in the tidal pools on the fly as well.
This is Roker pier on the mouth of the Wear.
 

chrishconnolly

Well-known member
Messages
1,847
Reaction score
244
Location
Perth
Shad

caught one on the flee in the river forth some years back in may not sure which kind. saw a lamprey in the dykes pool on the forth the same year and caught a smelt last year in Cornwall.
 

Taddy

New member
Banned
Messages
2,175
Reaction score
2
Location
Stockton on Tees
protected

They are protected under the wildlife and countryside act 1984? We are no longer allowed to fish for them same as white fishes etc.
Sturgeons wernt ever common,but lots of rivers had a strugeon run,now they big fish we know and i think they feed when entering the rivers so nature would have dictated that to many sturgeons will spoil the broth or in her case the rivers so im sure the runs were never ever massive.
The Yorks ouse has had them so too has the Ure fish were being caught up to the late 1800s as far up as borobridge-imagine that fishing for barbel and hitting one of them bad boys.
But both sturgeons and shads are on their backside along with the humble little smelts and yet all the money is directed towards salmon populations,them fish mentioned are the real endangered fishes in the uk.and Burbot and Houting are well gone extinct !
 

Richardgw

Well-known member
Messages
1,053
Reaction score
356
Location
Ross on Wye
Shad are still relatively common on the Wye and regularly take salmon flies and smaller spinners: had about half a dozen or so this year when salmon fishing. However numbers have declined significantly as when I first fished the Wye back in the 80s if you targeted them (it was legal back then) with small spinners or silver bodied flies on light tackle it could be a fish a cast and 20 or more in a session was easy enough and good fun.
 
Last edited:

Dryfly

New member
Messages
4,106
Reaction score
3
Location
Wiltshire
Good numbers on the Usk too. Not that anyone has fished the river for a couple of months... When they are in its almost impossible not to catch them despite not fishing for them.
 

miramichi

Active member
Messages
1,986
Reaction score
9
Shad and smelts are relatively common on the East Coast of North America. Smelt go from Labrador south to New England in America, and they spawn in just about every fresh water flowage that hits the coast. Shad are more particular about their spawning rivers. They are a warmer water fish and occur from New Brunswick, Canada south to the Saint John River in Florida. The heart of their range is the Connecticut River area where they grow to be 10 or 12 pounds. Personally I think they are poor eating as they are absolutely full of bones. Shad are not our only fresh water herring. We have "river herring" also called buckies, alewives and gasperaux. They are much smaller than shad.
 

sionpaul8962

New member
Messages
1
Reaction score
1
Sparling

If all lower rivers dams we're knocked out we might get the Sparling ( or Smelt ) back too, which redds on brackish or tidal sandbanks. Must have been great sea-trout food at one time. Lost from Tyne c 1840 too. EA silent on this valuable fish. Down to c 3 rivers now: Tay. Forth, Solway.
I just caught one now and released back in unharmed
Shad and smelts are relatively common on the East Coast of North America. Smelt go from Labrador south to New England in America, and they spawn in just about every fresh water flowage that hits the coast. Shad are more particular about their spawning rivers. They are a warmer water fish and occur from New Brunswick, Canada south to the Saint John River in Florida. The heart of their range is the Connecticut River area where they grow to be 10 or 12 pounds. Personally I think they are poor eating as they are absolutely full of bones. Shad are not our only fresh water herring. We have "river herring" also called buckies, alewives and gasperaux. They are much smaller than shad.
just had one and what stunning colours . Released back and unharmed
 

Attachments

  • 74EA1901-2AFC-416E-9A3C-AC82CDC52F79.jpeg
    74EA1901-2AFC-416E-9A3C-AC82CDC52F79.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 50
  • CCE4B579-0D3F-4D16-A6F5-E3749EEE6D62.jpeg
    CCE4B579-0D3F-4D16-A6F5-E3749EEE6D62.jpeg
    1.3 MB · Views: 56

Richardgw

Well-known member
Messages
1,053
Reaction score
356
Location
Ross on Wye
Have I seen a Shad – Yes

Caught one yesterday at Ross and three today at Bredwardine. That is more that I’ve caught over the last few years. But unfortunately no salmon seen or touched.
 

tenet

Well-known member
Messages
2,931
Reaction score
922
Location
cotswolds
Regularly taken on the Wye at Lower Symonds Yat back in the 80's and early 90's especiaļy when using a small mepps.
 

nickolas

Well-known member
Messages
755
Reaction score
637
Location
Nr Newbury

Source: Natural Resources Wales
[h=3]This month, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is asking people for their help to record sightings of a rare fish found in Welsh rivers.[/h]In June, thousands of Shad spawn in three rivers in South Wales, the Wye, Usk and Tywi. But NRW is interested in possible sightings elsewhere too, especially in North Wales.
There are two species, the allis shad (Alosa alosa) and twaite shad (Alosa fallax) which spend most of their lives at sea however, at this time of year, they move to rivers to spawn.*After spawning many of them die, but each female produces thousands of eggs to start the next generation.*Shad populations – which are threatened in the UK and Europe –* seem to be doing well in Wales.
Tristan Hatton-Ellis, Freshwater Ecosystems Team Leader at Natural Resources Wales said;
Like the swallow, shads are a sign of summer on the rivers and we are interested in shad records from anywhere in Wales but particularly from rivers in North Wales where we think there may be small populations.
“Look out for them at dusk in the middle to lower reaches of rivers, where you can see them circling one another.
“Later in the night, they spawn with a lot of noisy splashing as the males chase the females.

[h=4]Interesting Facts about Shad[/h]
  • Shad are*a protected species because they are so rare.
  • Allis and twaite shad are the only members of the herring family found in freshwater in the UK. They have various other names including the May Fish, King of the Herring,*and Bony Horseman.
  • Shad were once widely fished in Europe and were formerly eaten in Britain. In the Severn Estuary during 19th century, shad made up about one third of all catches, their value rivalling salmon.
  • Shad spawning takes place in flowing water over stones and gravel. Eggs take about four to six days to hatch. The young fish then drop quickly downstream to estuaries and inshore waters where they feed on small shrimps and grow rapidly.
  • Shad can live for 10 years. Females grow faster than males.
Tristan Hatton-Ellis added:
River or sea anglers sometimes catch them by accident, and you may also come across carcasses of fish that have either died naturally or been caught by otters.
“If you do catch a shad, please take a photograph and carefully return it to the river, minimizing handling as they are more delicate than many other fish.

If you see a shad or any other interesting wildlife, please send the record to one of the Local Records Centres across Wales.
There are four centres covering different parts of the country (see www.lercwales.org.uk) who store the information.
Photographs of shad can be sent to Tristan.hatton-ellis@naturalresourceswales.gov.uk for identification.


Article Source...
many years ago on the wye in Wales.
 

Scierra

Well-known member
Messages
822
Reaction score
1,094
Fished the Wye staying at Hat on Wye in the 80's , free fishing from think it was Walkers tackle outlet if you spent £??'s , we could see from from a great distance in the pub one evening some angler catching ? we were informed Shad , nowt doing salmon wise , grassed half a dozen on a baby doll res lure
 
Top